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Colossians 2

Notes & Transcripts

Col. 2

Christ –

In HIM hidden all Treasures of Wisdom and Knowledge … 

We are COMPLETE in HIM … 

Christ –

Christ – 2, 5, 6, 8, 11, 17, 20

Jesus – 6

The LORD – 6

Fullness of deity – 9

Head over all rule and authority    10,  19

Disarmed rulers and authorities – 15

By the CROSS…    death burial resurrection – glorified.

4 Warnings

1. let NO ONE DELUDE you …  with plausible arguments

2. no one Takes you captive … philosophy & empty deceit, human tradition, elemental spirits of the world

3. No one pass judgment on you 

4. No One disqualify you…

In HIM…

1. Filled in Him  10…   complete, full –

2. Circumcised with circumcision without hands… cutting of body of SIN

3. Baptized --  buried / raised     dead / made alive

4. Forgiven –

5. Cancelled the record of Debt … 

How get sidetracked

Plausible arguments

Philosophy / deceit

Human tradition

Old Testament laws

Asceticism  (cp. 20-23)

Worship of angels –

Visions –

Human precepts & teachings

“Fine sounding” (πιθανολογία, pithanologia) was a term used in philosophic discussions for arguments that lacked certainty. Weed suggests a meaning like the modern “fast talk.”1 It had to do with persuasive speech, directed the wrong way. But it did sound good, which made it dangerous.

[1]

If a man does not have the truth, then he must seek to attract a following through the clever presentation of his message. That is exactly what heretics always do. They argue from probabilities and build a system of teaching on deductions. On the other hand, if a man is preaching the truth of God, then he does not need to depend on such things as eloquence or clever arguments. The truth is its own best argument and, like a lion, will defend itself. [2]

“Philosophy” here (2:8) does not refer to the study of basic questions concerning God, man, and the meaning of life but to speculations and ideas of false teachers not rooted in divine revelation.[3]

Elemental principles  [of the world]

The word is also found in Col 2:20, and elsewhere in the New Testament in Gal 4:3, 9; Heb 5:12; 2 Pet 3:10, 12, but none of the New Testament usages gives a completely clear meaning applicable to this text.[4]

What does stoicheia mean here? O’Brien lists three major lines of interpretation.4 A first sees stoicheia as principles of religious instruction in the world prior to Christ, as if the heretics were returning to an immature stage of religion. A second considers the meaning to be the elements of the visible material world, and would argue the heresy tried to bind adherents to things of this world. The third, and most widely accepted view today, sees stoicheia as personal spiritual beings who would control access to God (in the heresy). They would be the same as the “powers and authorities” of 2:10, 15. In some way, then, the attempt was made to relate to these powers. It is objected that this view does not parallel “human tradition.” One study (Wink) has argued that no case of this meaning for the term can be clearly documented before the third century a.d.5 However this does not prove the term could not have been used that way earlier.

The problem is a puzzling one. Paul was probably quoting the false teachers here. Whatever they meant, Paul’s “of this world” with the earlier “human” makes their case a pitiful rival to Christ, as the following verses will powerfully demonstrate.

[5]

“Worship of angels” is generally understood as the praise directed to beings less than God. But Francis suggests the Greek is to be understood as the worship which angels themselves performed (subjective genitive) and he supports this from Jewish (non-biblical) literature. The meaning, then, would be an exalted experience in which the practitioners would either observe or participate in the angelic worship of God. This would be some type of visionary experience.

[6]


----

1 Weed, p. 65.

[1]Ash, A. L. (1994). Philippians, Colossians & Philemon. Outlines at beginning of each book. The College Press NIV commentary (Col 2:5). Joplin, Mo.: College Press.

[2]MacDonald, W., & Farstad, A. (1997, c1995). Believer's Bible Commentary : Old and New Testaments (Col 2:4). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

[3]Bailey, M., Constable, T., Swindoll, C. R., & Zuck, R. B. (1999). Nelson's New Testament Survey : Discover the Background, Theology and Meaning of Every Book in the New Testament (430). Nashville: Word.

[4]Ash, A. L. (1994). Philippians, Colossians & Philemon. Outlines at beginning of each book. The College Press NIV commentary (Col 2:9). Joplin, Mo.: College Press.

4 OBrien, pp. 130–132.

5 Cited in Patzia, pp. 53f.

[5]Ash, A. L. (1994). Philippians, Colossians & Philemon. Outlines at beginning of each book. The College Press NIV commentary (Col 2:9). Joplin, Mo.: College Press.

[6]Ash, A. L. (1994). Philippians, Colossians & Philemon. Outlines at beginning of each book. The College Press NIV commentary (Col 2:18). Joplin, Mo.: College Press.

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