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Sin's Universal Comfort/Cure

Notes & Transcripts

         MANCHESTER BAPTIST CHURCH

                                                             Rev. Oscar Ramirez

                                                                October 30, 2009

                                                      PRELIMINARY PAGE

        TEXT: Luke 13:1-5 (KJV)

         C.I.T.: Jesus tells us that we cannot judge by appearances.

    THESIS: We cannot make a judgment about Pollo except that he placed his trust in the Lord Jesus Christ’s sacrifice on the cross for all of us.

PURPOSE:

         M.O.: Supportive

          S.O.: Today know that our hope is built on nothing less than Jesus blood and righteousness.

               Sin’s Universal Comfort/Cure

I.          There is a tendency divert attention from our own sin.  V. 1

II.        Appearances of sinfulness can be deceptive.  Vv. 2, 4

III.       The solution is acknowledge sin and repent.  Vv. 3, 5

INTRODUCTION:

        TEXT: Luke 13:1-5 (KJV)

         C.I.T.: Jesus tells us that we cannot judge by appearances.

    THESIS: We cannot make a judgment about Pollo except that he placed his trust in the Lord Jesus Christ’s sacrifice on the cross for all of us.

PURPOSE:

          S.O.: Today know that our hope is built on nothing less than Jesus blood and righteousness.

               Sin’s Universal Comfort/Cure

I.          There is a tendency divert attention from our own sin.  V. 1

1 † There were present at that season some that told him of the Galilaeans, whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices.

To take the attention off of themselves (the Pharisees) they pointed to someone in apparent worse condition.

13:1 Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. This incident is in keeping with what was known about the character of Pilate. Evidently, some worshipers from Galilee were condemned by Rome—perhaps because they were seditious zealots (see note on Matt. 10:4)—and were sought out and killed in the temple by Roman authorities while in the process of offering a sacrifice. Such a killing would have been the grossest sort of blasphemy. Incidents like this inflamed the Jews’ hatred of Rome and finally led to rebellion, and the destruction of Jerusalem in a.d. 70.

II.        Appearances of sinfulness can be deceptive.  Vv. 2, 4

2 And Jesus answering said unto them, Suppose ye that these Galilaeans were sinners above all the Galilaeans, because they suffered such things?

NO, the fact is that we are all sinners.  There are no degrees of sin.

13:2 worse sinners. It was the belief of many that disaster and sudden death always signified divine displeasure over particular sins (cf. Job 4:7). Those who suffered in uncommon ways were therefore assumed to be guilty of some more severe immorality (cf. John 9:2).

4 Or those eighteen,† upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinnersa above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?

An accident for example, does it make you a worse person?  NO!

13:4 Siloam. An area at the S end of the lower city of Jerusalem, where there was a well known pool (cf. John 9:7, 11). Evidently one of the towers guarding the aqueduct collapsed, perhaps while under construction, killing some people. Again, the question in the minds of people was regarding the connection between calamity and iniquity (“worse sinners”). Jesus responded by saying that such a calamity was not God’s way to single out an especially evil group for death, but as a means of warning to all sinners. Calamitous judgment was eventually coming to all if they did not repent.

III.       The solution is acknowledge sin and repent.  Vv. 3, 5

3 I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.

Were they worse sinners?  No, but the consequences are still the same for anybody.  What we must do is acknowledge our sin and repent.

13:3 unless you repent. Jesus did not deny the connection between catastrophe and human evil, for all such afflictions ultimately stem from the curse of humanity’s fallenness (Gen. 3:17–19). Furthermore, specific calamities may indeed be the fruit of certain iniquities (Prov. 24:16). But Christ challenged the people’s notion that they were morally superior to those who suffered in such catastrophes. He called all to repent, for all were in danger of sudden destruction. No one is guaranteed time to prepare for death, so now is the time for repentance for all (cf. 2 Cor. 6:2). you will all likewise perish. These words prophetically warned of the approaching judgment of Israel, which culminated in the catastrophic destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70. Thousands in Jerusalem were killed by the Romans. See note on Matt. 23:36.

5 I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.

Were they worse sinners?  No, but the consequences are still the same for anybody.  What we must do is acknowledge our sin and repent.

[1]

[2]

CONCLUSION:          S.O.: Today know that our hope is built on nothing less than Jesus blood and righteousness.


----

†  A Greek word occurs that is not directly translated in the King James Version.

Greek Strongs: 1161

†  A Greek word occurs that is not directly translated in the King James Version.

Greek Strongs: 3638

a  sinners: or, debtors

[1]  The Holy Bible : King James Version. electronic ed. of the 1769 edition of the 1611 Authorized Version. Bellingham WA : Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1995

[2]MacArthur, John Jr: The MacArthur Study Bible. electronic ed. Nashville : Word Pub., 1997, c1997, S. Lk 13:1

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