Drop files to upload.
Faithlife Corporation

From the Call of Abraham to the Egyptian Bondage

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 2 views
Notes & Transcripts

THE AGE OF PROMISE

 

LESSON V

 

FROM THE CALL OF ABRAHAM TO THE EGYPTIAN BONDAGE

        After the dispersion at the tower of Babel, Nimrod, a descendant of Ham, founded an empire on the Euphrates River, the Chaldean or early Babylonian Empire.  Misraim, a son of Ham, founded the Egyptian Empire, the other great center of early civilization.  Although there was a steady progress in conquest, wealth, and the arts, there was also an increase in religious corruption, and the rise and spread of idolatry.  Wherever man went, they forsook the worship of the true God, and invented religious practices and gods of their own.

        Idolatry was spreading fast over the earth, dishonoring God and debasing man.  So God chose to separate a family from all the families of the earth, that in them He might preserve pure and undefiled religion, and the knowledge and worship of Himself, the one true God.  The one chosen was Abram, whose birthplace was Ur of the Chaldees.  It was from here he was called by God.  The people of his day were idolaters, even his own father, Terah, was tainted with the curse.  The city of Ur is believed to have been devoted to the moon-god called Ur.

        Abram was commanded by God to leave his country and family and go to a place that would be shown him later.  The command was accompanied by a promise and a covenant.  He would become a great nation; God would make his name great; and the land of Canaan was to be the everlasting possession of his seed; and through him all the families of the earth would be blessed.  Gen. 12:1-5; 15:1-18; 17:1-14

        All this initiated a new start for the Kingdom of God, for in the call of Abram God began to set things up for the promised redeemer.  Although God had promised that Abraham’s seed would be innumerable, years passed without any sign of offspring.  Impatient with the years of waiting, at the suggestion of Sarai, Abram took Hagar, a bond-maid, and became the father of Ismael, who became the father of the Arab race.  Fourteen years later Isaac, the son of promise was miraculously born.  Gen. 18:9-15; 21:1-7  Isaac inherited his father’s faith, and obtained a renewal of the Abrahamic covenant.  He had two sons, Esau and Jacob.  Esau carelessly sold his birthright to Jacob, and there was constant strife between the two brothers which perpetuated throughout the history of the chosen people.  Esau was the father of the Edomites who were a constant source of trouble to the Israelites, the descendants of Jacob.

        Jacob’s name was eventually changed to Israel, “A prince with God.”  Gen. 32:24-32  Of his twelve sons, Joseph, the child of his old age was the favorite.  He was hated by his brothers, by whom he was eventually sold, and taken into Egypt by Midianite traders.  There God blessed and prospered him.  Twenty years later a great famine caused Jacob, with his children, to journey and settle in Egypt at Joseph’s invitation.  Ex. 1:1-7  After the death of both Jacob and Joseph, a king was raised up in Egypt that “knew not Joseph.”  Alarmed at the growth of the Hebrew people, he determined to crush them by cruel oppression.  Ex. 1:8-14

        During this dark era of bondage, a baby was born who was destined to deliver the enslaved nation.  Concealed in a basket among the reeds of the river, he was discovered by a daughter of Pharaoh.  She called his name Moses and claimed him as her son, and Moses lived in the Court of Pharaoh for forty years.  At this age he renounced the pleasures of Egypt and championed the deliverance of his own people, the Hebrews.  Prepared for the great task in the desert from where he had fled, he returned to Egypt upon God’s instruction, and after a bitter contest, compelled Pharaoh, through God’s miracles, to let the people go.  On the night of their deliverance from Egypt, God instituted the Passover.

        Thus the age of promise ended in bondage and oppression.

Conclusion:

1.      Abraham’s day was filled with idol worship.  What do you think is robbing God of the worship He deserves in man today?

2.      Put yourself in Abraham’s shoes and describe what it would be like to be told to move to a place that was undisclosed.  How do you think Sarah took this news?

3.      Do you think Abraham had any doubt or wondered how God would bless all families of the earth through his seed when he was old and had no children?

4.      Sarah intervened in God’s plan and came up with her own in order to give Abraham a son.  Do you think we often cut short a miracle from happening when we get impatient and try to work things out on our own?

5.      Up to now we have seen God raise up special men to be used in His plan to turn things around when it got bad:  Noah, Abraham, and Moses.  What would it take to be chosen as one of these men?

6.      How could God use you as one of those special men to effect the lives of those around you?

RELATED MEDIA
See the rest →
Get this media plus thousands more when you start a free trial.
Get started for FREE
RELATED SERMONS
See the rest →