Drop files to upload.
Faithlife
Faithlife
Avatar
Avatar
Sign in

Fear

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 3 views
Notes & Transcripts

Fear, Unholy.

1.     A characteristic of the wicked. Re 21:8.

2.     Is described as

a.     A fear of idols. 2Ki 17:38.

b.     A fear of man. 1Sa 15:24; Joh 9:22.

c.     A fear of judgments. Isa 2:19; Lu 21:26; Re 6:16,17.

d.     A fear of future punishment. Heb 10:27.

e.     Overwhelming. Ex 15:16; Job 15:21,24.

f.     Consuming. Ps 73:19.

3.     A guilty conscience leads to. Ge 3:8,10; Ps 53:5; Pr 28:1.

4.     Seizes the wicked. Job 15:24; 18:11.

5.     Surprises the hypocrite. Isa 33:14,18.

6.     The wicked judicially filled with. Le 26:16,17; De 28:65-67; Jer 49:5.

7.     Shall be realised. Pr 1:27; 10:24.

8.     God mocks. Pr 1:26.

9.     Saints sometimes tempted to. Ps 55:5.

10.     Saints delivered from. Pr 1:33; Isa 14:3.

11.     Trust in God, a preservative from. Ps 27:1.

12.     Exhortations against. Isa 8:12; Joh 14:27.

13.     Exemplified

a.     Adam. Ge 3:10.

b.     Cain. Ge 4:14.

c.     Midianites. Jdj 7:21,22.

d.     Philistines. 1Sa 14:15.

e.     Saul. 1Sa 28:5,20.

f.     Adonijah’s guests. 1Ki 1:49.

g.     Haman. Es 7:6.

h.     Ahaz. Isa 7:2.

i.     Belshazzar. Da 5:6.

j.     Pilate. Joh 19:8.

k.     Felix. Ac 24:25.

Cultivated: Ex. 3:5; Ex. 19:12, 13; Heb. 12:18–24

Guilty: Job 15:20–25; Job 18:11; Prov. 1:24–27; Prov. 10:24; Dan. 5:6; Jas. 2:19 Instances of Guilty Fear: Adam and Eve, Gen. 3:8–13. The guards at Jesus’ tomb, Matt. 28:4. Judas, Matt. 27:3–5. Devils, Jas. 2:19. See Conviction, Of Sin.

A Motive of Obedience: Lev. 19:14, 32; Lev. 25:17, 36, 43; Num. 32:15; Deut. 6:13–15; Deut. 7:4; Deut. 8:5, 6; Deut. 10:12, 13, 20; Deut. 13:4, 6–11; Deut. 14:23; Deut. 15:9; Deut. 17:11–13; Deut. 19:16–20; Deut. 21:18–21; Deut. 28:14–68; Deut. 31:11–13 Josh. 23:11–16. 1 Sam. 12:24, 25 vs. 14,15.; Job 13:21; Job 31:1–4, 13–15, 23; Prov. 16:6; Isa. 1:20; Jer. 4:4; Jer. 22:5; Matt. 10:28 Luke 12:4, 5. 2 Cor. 5:10, 11; 2 Tim. 4:1, 2; 2 Pet. 3:10–12; Rev. 14:9, 10

Fearanxiety caused by approaching danger

A.     Causes of:

Disobedience     Gen. 3:10

Impending judgment     Heb. 11:7

Persecution     John 20:19

Events of nature     Acts 27:17, 29

Suspicion     Acts 9:26

Uncertainty     2 Cor. 11:3

Final events     Luke 21:26

Death     Heb. 2:15

B.     Effects of:

Demoralization     1 Sam. 13:5–8

Paralysis     Matt. 28:4

Silent testimony     John 9:22

C.     Instances of:

Abraham     Gen. 20:11

Jacob     Gen. 32:9–11

Soldiers     Matt. 27:54

Fearlessnesswithout fear

A.     Source of:

Believing God’s promises     Num. 13:30

Challenge of duty     Ex. 32:26–29

Regard for God’s holiness     Num. 25:1–9

Believing God     Acts 27:22–26

B.     Exemplified by:

Abram     Gen. 14:14–16

Jonathan     1 Sam. 14:6–14

David     1 Sam. 17:34–37

Nehemiah     Neh. 4:1–23

Hebrew men     Dan. 3:16–30

Peter and John     Acts 4:13

Paul     Acts 21:10–14

Fear.

Emotional foreboding or dread of impending distress or misfortune. Often spoken of as the source of religion. Yet fear alone can never account for true religion, since men are impelled to draw near unto God, the object of their worship. One does not desire to come close to the being he fears.

The biblical conception of fear embraces a much wider dimension than our common English word, which simply denotes some sort of dread or terror. While this meaning forms an essential part of the scriptural picture, it is by no means the primary significance, especially when the fear of God—an awe-inspiring reverence—is referred to.

There is, of course, a legitimate place for the fear of God in the lower, anxious sense. We are told, “It is a fearful (terrible) thing to fall into the hands of the living God” (Heb 10:31). Jesus taught that we should fear him (God) who has power to punish sin and consign men to utter destruction (Lk 12:4, 5). Fear has a constructive role to play in enabling men to realize both the degeneracy of their souls and their need of divine forgiveness. The first occurrence of such fear may be found in Genesis 3 where Adam and Eve recoiled from the presence of the Holy God whose commandment they had blatantly spurned. Their fear was entirely reasonable for they had been sternly warned that disobedience would incur a grave judgment. Fear is quite naturally the logical consequence of sin (Gn 3:10; 4:13, 14; Prv 28:1). The Bible presents an array of people who are plagued with deep-reaching anxiety (e.g., Cain, Saul, Ahaz, and Pilate). Anxious fear seizes the wicked (Jb 15:24), surprises the hypocrite (Is 33:14), and consumes evildoers (Ps 73:19), whose faithless lives are characterized by fear (Rv 21:8). Pharaoh’s mighty host was virtually paralyzed by fear as God moved against them (Ex 15:16), and Job’s associate Bildad spoke of men driven to their knees by the judgments of God (Jb 18:11).

Fear has a tendency to either immobilize men or seriously affect their activity. This is especially true of the spiritually uncommitted. Saul’s fear of the people caused him to transgress the commandment of God (1 Sm 15:24). The parents whose blind son was miraculously healed by Jesus were afraid to support Christ because they feared the Jews (Jn 9:22). In the parable of the talents Jesus told of a man whose fear prevented him from doing his reasonable duty (Mt 25:25).

Jesus Christ, by his atoning death, resurrection, and heavenly intercession for believers, is the unique liberator from fear. The apostle Paul encouraged the Romans by informing them that in their conversion to Christ, they received the Holy Spirit, not as a spirit of fear and bondage, but as the spirit of adoption, whereby they could address God as “Abba” (Rom 8:15; the Aramaic word commonly used by Jewish children to address their fathers). This is the word by which our Lord Jesus addressed his heavenly Father and which Christians, by virtue of their adoption into the family of God, may also use in speaking to God (Gal 4:6). Recipients of God’s love have received a dynamic force for casting out their anxieties (1 Jn 4:18). A sense of God’s intimate love inspired Paul to say, “If God is for us, who is against us?” (Rom 8:31).

Unwarranted fear may harm the efforts of the people of God. Jeremiah was warned by God not to fear the faces of his opponents (Jer 1:8) lest God allow calamity to befall him (v 17). Similar calls to courage were given to Jeremiah’s contemporary, Ezekiel, and to a great many others (Jos 1:7, 9; Ez 2:6). We realize that even godly people are tempted to fear and may be temporarily overwhelmed (Ps 55:5). So God repeatedly counsels his people not to succumb to that temptation (Is 8:12; Jn 14:1, 27). He tells them to heap their anxieties upon the God of their redemption, whose care for his sheep is infinitely great (1 Pt 5:7). Faith, then, is the indispensable antecedent of fearlessness as seen in the words of Isaiah: “Thou dost keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on thee, because he trusts in thee” (Is 26:3). The psalmist repeatedly stresses the role of faith in conquering fear (37:1; 46:2; 112:7).

Genuine faith is expressed in, and animated by, a reverential awe, and this is the basic meaning of the biblical idea of the fear of God. Unless there is personal awareness of the awesome and majestic sovereignty of God, it is impossible to have a meaningful faith existing in one’s heart (Pss 5:7; 89:7). When God was called “the fear of Isaac” (Gn 31:42) it showed the patriarch’s understanding of the immutable greatness of Yahweh. Isaac’s father, Abraham, anxiously observed the absence of this holy fear in the people who dwell in Gerar (20:11). Even Jesus carried out his ministry in the fear of God (Is 11:2, 3; Heb 5:7). Though Christians are to be liberated from the fear of men (Heb 13:6), death (2:15), and life in general (2 Tm 1:6, 7), they must never lose their sense of the awesomeness of God. Such awareness not only leads to true wisdom (Ps 111:1) but also provides direction for the child of God throughout life (Phil 2:12; Eph 5:21).

Godly fear is characterized by total allegiance to the one true God. The Samaritans, in attempting to serve Yahweh and their idols simultaneously, were rejected by God (2 Kgs 17:33, 41). Those who love God learn of wholesome fear by searching the Scriptures (Prv 2:3–5), the Word of God, which the ancient Israelites were commanded to cleave to and obey as evidence of their reverence for God (Dt 6:2). In Acts 10:2 Cornelius and his family were called “God-fearers” because of their high regard for the God of Israel and because they stood in awe of his person. True reverence for God must invariably express itself in good works and holy living (2 Cor 7:1). To truly revere the Lord entails avoiding sin (Ex 20:20) and translating the directives of the Word of God into everyday experience (Eccl 12:13). This holy fear is actually a source of joy (Ps 2:11) and a veritable fountain of life (Prv 14:27). The fear of the Lord is more valuable than the greatest material riches (15:16) because the Lord takes pleasure in those who hold him in such high regard (Ps 147:11).

FEAR - a feeling of reverence, awe, and respect, or an unpleasant emotion caused by a sense of danger. Fear may be directed toward God or humankind, and it may be either healthy or harmful.

A healthy fear is reverence or respect. The Bible teaches that children are to respect their parents (Lev. 19:3), wives are to respect their husbands (Eph. 5:33), and slaves are to respect their masters (Eph. 6:5). The Scriptures also declare that "the fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge" (Prov. 1:7) as well as "the beginning of wisdom" (Prov. 9:10).

A harmful fear is a sense of terror or dread. Believers are instructed not to fear human beings (Matt. 10:28; Phil. 1:28), because they cannot ultimately harm us. Wicked men, however, are constantly fearing other people, especially the righteous (Prov. 28:1; Matt. 14:5; Rom. 13:3-4). Such fear causes them to act deceitfully in an attempt to hide their sins (2 Sam. 11; Matt. 28:4-15).

On the other hand, the unbeliever has every reason to be panic-stricken at thoughts of God, for he stands condemned before Him (Matt. 10:28; John 3:18). And yet, this kind of fear of God does not often lead to repentance. It normally leads to a feeble attempt to hide from God (Gen. 3:8; Rev. 6:15-17) or worse, to a denial of God’s existence and His claim on a person’s life (Ps. 14:1; Rom. 1:18-28).

c. Fear of men

This can be expressed as: (i) a reverential awe and regard of men, as of masters and magistrates (1 Pet. 2:18; Rom. 13:7); (ii) a blind dread of them and what they can do (Nu. 14:9; Is. 8:12; Pr. 29:25); and (iii) in a peculiar sense a Christian concern for them lest they be ruined by sin (1 Cor. 2:3; 2 Cor. 11:3; Col. 2:1). This kind of fear, and also the slavish fear mentioned in (b) above, can be cast out by true love to God (1 Jn. 4:18).

d. ‘Fear’ as the object of fear

Fear is used in another sense, as in Gn. 31:42, 53, where God is called the ‘Fear’ of *Isaac—i.e. the God whom Isaac feared and worshipped. Their ‘fear’, the thing that terrifies them, comes upon the wicked (Pr. 1:26-27; 10:24; cf. Is. 66:4). When the Hebrews entered the promised land God sent his fear before them, destroying and scattering the Canaanites, or so impressing them with his fear as to render them spiritless and unable to withstand the invaders (Ex. 23:27-28). Fear in this sense is found also in Jb. 4:6 (cf. 9:34; 13:21): ‘Is not your fear of God your confidence, and the integrity of your ways your hope?’

FEAR Emotional foreboding or dread of impending distress or misfortune. Often spoken of as the cause of people wanting religion. Yet fear alone can never account for true religion, since men are impelled to draw near unto God, the object of their worship. One does not desire to come close to the being one fears.

The biblical conception of fear embraces a much wider dimension than does our common English word, which simply denotes dread or terror. While this meaning forms an essential part of the scriptural picture, it is by no means the primary significance, especially when the fear of God—an awe-inspiring reverence—is referred to.

There is, of course, a legitimate place for the fear of God in the lower, anxious sense. We are told, “It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God” (Heb 10:31, rsv). Jesus taught that we should fear God because he has the power to punish sin and consign people to utter destruction (Lk 12:4–5). Fear has a constructive role to play in enabling men to realize both the degeneracy of their souls and their need of divine forgiveness. The first occurrence of such fear may be found in Genesis 3, where Adam and Eve recoiled from the presence of the holy God whose commandment they had blatantly spurned. Their fear was entirely reasonable because they had been sternly warned that disobedience would incur a grave judgment. Fear is quite naturally the logical consequence of sin (Gn 3:10; 4:13–14; Prv 28:1). The Bible presents an array of people who are plagued with deep-reaching anxiety (e.g., Cain, Saul, Ahaz, and Pilate). Anxious fear seizes the wicked (Jb 15:24), surprises the hypocrite (Is 33:14), and consumes evildoers (Ps 73:19), whose faithless lives are characterized by fear (Rv 21:8). Pharaoh’s mighty host was virtually paralyzed by fear as God moved against them (Ex 15:16), and Job’s associate Bildad spoke of men driven to their knees by the judgments of God (Jb 18:11).

Fear has a tendency to either immobilize people or seriously affect their activity. This is especially true of the spiritually uncommitted. Saul’s fear of the people caused him to transgress the commandment of God (1 Sm 15:24). The parents whose blind son was miraculously healed by Jesus were afraid to support Christ because they feared the Jews (Jn 9:22). In the parable of the talents Jesus told of a man whose fear prevented him from doing his reasonable duty (Mt 25:25).

Jesus Christ, by his atoning death, resurrection, and heavenly intercession for believers, is the unique liberator from fear. The apostle Paul encouraged the Romans (Rom 8:15) by informing them that in their conversion to Christ they received the Holy Spirit, not as a spirit of fear and bondage, but as the spirit of adoption, whereby they could address God as “Abba” (the Aramaic word commonly used by Jewish children to address their fathers). This is the word by which our Lord Jesus addressed his heavenly Father and which Christians, by virtue of their adoption into the family of God, may also use in speaking to God (Gal 4:6). Recipients of God’s love have received a dynamic force for casting out their anxieties (1 Jn 4:18).

Unwarranted fear may harm the efforts of the people of God. Jeremiah was warned by God not to fear the faces of his opponents (Jer 1:8) lest God allow calamity to befall him (v 17). Similar calls to courage were given to Jeremiah’s contemporary, Ezekiel, and to a great many others (Jos 1:7–9; Ez 2:6). We realize that even godly people are tempted to fear and may be temporarily overwhelmed (Ps 55:5). Therefore, God repeatedly counsels his people not to succumb to that temptation (Is 8:12; Jn 14:1, 27). He tells them to heap their anxieties upon the God of their redemption, whose care for his sheep is infinitely great (1 Pt 5:7). Faith, then, is the indispensable antecedent of fearlessness as seen in the words of Isaiah: “Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on thee: because he trusteth in thee” (Is 26:3, kjv). The psalmists repeatedly stress the role of faith in conquering fear (Pss 37:1; 46:2; 112:7).

Genuine faith is expressed in, and animated by, a reverential awe, and this is the basic meaning of the biblical idea of the fear of God. Unless there is personal awareness of the awesome and majestic sovereignty of God, it is impossible to have a meaningful faith existing in one’s heart (Pss 5:7; 89:7). Though Christians are to be liberated from the fear of men (Heb 13:6), death (2:15), and life in general (2 Tm 1:6–7), they must never lose their sense of the awesomeness of God. Such awareness not only leads to true wisdom (Ps 111:10) but also provides direction for the child of God throughout life (Eph 5:21; Phil 2:12). Those who love God learn of wholesome fear by searching the Scriptures (Prv 2:3–5), the Word of God, which the ancient Israelites were commanded to cleave to and obey as evidence of their reverence for God (Dt 6:2). In Acts 10:2 Cornelius and his family were called “God-fearers” because of their high regard for the God of Israel and because they stood in awe of his person. True reverence for God must invariably express itself in good works and holy living (2 Cor 7:1). This holy fear is actually a source of joy (Ps 2:11) and a veritable fountain of life (Prv 14:27). The fear of the Lord is more valuable than the greatest material riches (15:16) because the Lord takes pleasure in those who hold him in such high regard (Ps 147:11).

φοβέομαι (48 / 98)

 φόβος (9 / 98)

φοβερός (2 / 98)

φόβος (27 / 98)

φοβέομαι ἀπό (1 / 98)

φοβέομαι  θεός (1 / 98)

δειλία (1 / 98)

φοβέομαι φόβος μέγας (1 / 98)

ἔκφοβος (1 / 98)

 φοβέομαι (3 / 98)


----

e.g. for example

v verse (pl. vv)

cf confer (Lat.), compare

rsv Revised Standard Version

kjv King James Version

RELATED MEDIA
See the rest →
Get this media plus thousands more when you start a free trial.
Get started for FREE
RELATED SERMONS
See the rest →