Mary Magdalene the Faithful Servant

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Sermon: Mary Magdalene the Faithful Servant

John 20:18 Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: "I have seen the Lord!" And she told them that he had said these things to her.

Matt 27:56 Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joses, and the mother of Zebedee's sons.

Mateo 27:61 Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were sitting there opposite the tomb.

Matt 28:1 After the Sabbath, at dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to look at the tomb.

Mark 15:40 Some women were watching from a distance. Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James the younger and of Joses, and Salome.

Mark 15:47 Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses saw where he was laid.

Mark 16:1 When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus' body.

Mark 16:9 When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons.

Luke 8:2  and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out;

Luke 24:10 It was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the others with them who told this to the apostles.

John 19:25 Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene.

John 20:1 Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance.

Sermón: Maria Magdalena la Sierva Fiel (Juan 20:18)

Juan 20:18 (NBLH)  María Magdalena fue y anunció a los discípulos: "¡He visto al Señor!," y que El le había dicho estas cosas.

Mateo 27:56 entre las cuales estaban María Magdalena, María la madre de Jacobo y de José, y la madre de los hijos de Zebedeo.

Mateo 27:61 Y estaban allí María Magdalena, y la otra María, sentadas delante del sepulcro.

Mateo 28:1 Pasado el día de reposo, al amanecer del primer día de la semana, vinieron María Magdalena y la otra María,  a ver el sepulcro.

Marcos 15:40 También había algunas mujeres mirando de lejos,  entre las cuales estaban María Magdalena,  María la madre de Jacobo el menor y de José,  y Salomé,

Marcos 15:47 (NBLH) Y María Magdalena y María, la madre de José, miraban para saber dónde lo ponían

Marcos 16:1 Cuando pasó el día de reposo, María Magdalena, María la madre de Jacobo, y Salomé,  compraron especias aromáticas para ir a ungirle.

Marcos 16:9 Habiendo, pues, resucitado Jesús por la mañana, el primer día de la semana, apareció primeramente a María Magdalena, de quien había echado siete demonios.

Lucas 8:2 y algunas mujeres que habían sido sanadas de espíritus malos y de enfermedades: María, que se llamaba Magdalena, de la que habían salido siete demonios,

Lucas 24:10 Eran María Magdalena, y Juana, y María madre de Jacobo, y las demás con ellas, quienes dijeron estas cosas a los apóstoles

Juan 19:25 Estaban junto a la cruz de Jesús su madre, y la hermana de su madre, María mujer de Cleofas, y María Magdalena.

Juan 20:1 El primer día de la semana,  María Magdalena fue de mañana,  siendo aún oscuro,  al sepulcro;  y vio quitada la piedra del sepulcro.

John 20:18  Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: "I have seen the Lord!" And she told them that he had said these things to her. (NBLH)  María Magdalena fue y anunció a los discípulos: "¡He visto al Señor!," y que El le había dicho estas cosas.

 

Mark 16:9-11  When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons. 10 She went and told those who had been with him and who were mourning and weeping. 11 When they heard that Jesus was alive and that she had seen him, they did not believe it. RV60  Habiendo,  pues,  resucitado Jesús por la mañana,  el primer día de la semana,  apareció primeramente a María Magdalena,  de quien había echado siete demonios.  (10)  Yendo ella,  lo hizo saber a los que habían estado con él,  que estaban tristes y llorando.  (11)  Ellos,  cuando oyeron que vivía,  y que había sido visto por ella,  no lo creyeron.

 

# Appeared to Location Time Scriptures
1 Mary Magdelene Jerusalem Sunday Mark 16:9-11; John 20:11-18
2 Some other women Jerusalem Sunday Matthew 28:9-10
3 Peter Jerusalem Sunday Luke 24:34; 1 Cor. 15:5
4 Emmaus disciples Emmaus Sunday Luke 24:13-35
S 10 disciples Jerusalem Sunday Mark 16:14; Luke 24:26-43; John 20:19-25
6 11 disciples Jerusalem A week later John 20:26-31; 1 Cor. 15:5
7 7 disciples Galilee ? John 21:1-25
8 500 at one time ? ? 1 Cor. 15:6
9 James (brother of Jesus) ? ? 1 Cor. 15:7
10 11 disciples Galilee ? Matthew 28:16-20; Mark 16:15-18
11 11 disciples Jerusalem 40 days later Luke 24:44-53; Acts 1:3-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luke 8:1-3  After this, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The Twelve were with him, 2 and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out; 3 Joanna the wife of Cuza, the manager of Herod's household; Susanna; and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means. RV60  Aconteció después,  que Jesús iba por todas las ciudades y aldeas,  predicando y anunciando el evangelio del reino de Dios,  y los doce con él,  (2)  y algunas mujeres que habían sido sanadas de espíritus malos y de enfermedades:  María,  que se llamaba Magdalena,  de la que habían salido siete demonios,  (3)  Juana,  mujer de Chuza intendente de Herodes,  y Susana,  y otras muchas que le servían de sus bienes. [NBLH  que de sus bienes personales contribuían al sostenimiento de ellos].

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8:2 certain women. Rabbis normally did not have women as disciples. Mary called Magdalene. Her name probably derives from the Galilean town of Magdala. Some believe she is the woman described in 7:37–50, but it seems highly unlikely that Luke would introduce her here by name for the first time if she were the main figure in the account he just completed. Also, while it is clear that she had suffered at the hands of “demons,” there is no reason whatsoever to think that she had ever been a prostitute. 8:3 Joanna. This woman is also mentioned in 24:10, but nowhere else in Scripture. It is possible that she was a source for some of the details Luke recounts about Herod (cf. 23:8, 12). See 1:3. Susanna. Aside from this reference, she is nowhere mentioned in Scripture. She is probably someone Luke knew personally. from their substance. It was a Jewish custom for disciples to support rabbis in this way. Cf. 10:7; 1 Cor. 9:4–11; Gal 6:6; 1 Tim. 5:17, 18. 8:1-3. Much as the woman had responded positively to Jesus, in contrast with Simon the Pharisee (7:36-50), so others responded positively to the message of the kingdom which Jesus was proclaiming and some responded negatively (8:4-15). The believers included the Twelve and a number of women who had been recipients of Jesus’ healing power, including Mary (called Magdalene; Mary from Magdala in Galilee) from whom seven demons had come out. Often in Scripture the number seven is used to denote completion. Apparently Mary had been totally demon-possessed. Joanna, who was the wife of one of Herod’s officials, was also singled out, as was Susanna. These three and many other women were helping to support them (Jesus and the Twelve) out of their own means. This would have been viewed as a scandalous situation in Palestine in that day. However, like the forgiven woman (7:36-50), these women had also been forgiven much and they loved much. They were responding positively to Jesus’ message about His kingdom. 8:1–3 The fact that Mary called Magdalene is introduced here as though for the first time makes it unlikely that she was the sinful woman of 7:36–50. Mary Magdalene is also distinct from Mary of Bethany in John 12:3. Joanna the wife of Chuza, Herod’s steward: News of Jesus had reached Herod’s palace. provided for Him from their substance: This is an example of how some women of means used their wealth to benefit the work of God. 8:1 Not long afterward Jesus began a tour of the nearby cities and villages to announce the Good News concerning the Kingdom of God. He took his twelve disciples with him. The Gospel again gives a vague time reference, only that not long afterward (after the event with the sinful woman at the Pharisee’s house, 7:36–50), Jesus began a tour of the nearby cities and villages. Jesus’ mission remained unchanged—he continued to announce the Good News concerning the Kingdom of God (see 4:43; 7:22). The twelve disciples (named in 6:13–16) traveled with him—Jesus poured much of his ministry into them. As Jesus traveled and preached the Good News, he was also training the Twelve, preparing them for future ministry.

8:2–3  along with some women he had healed and from whom he had cast out evil spirits. Among them were Mary Magdalene, from whom he had cast out seven demons; Joanna, the wife of Chuza, Herod’s business manager; Susanna; and many others who were contributing from their own resources to support Jesus and his disciples. Luke gives more attention to women than any other Gospel. Women played a special role in the life and ministry of Jesus (see the chart, “Jesus and Women”). Jesus’ acceptance of women as disciples and as participants in his ministry and teaching gave women a positive place in the NT church (Acts 1:14). Women traveling with Jesus and his disciples would have been completely uncharacteristic of rabbis in ancient times. Rabbis refused to teach women because they were generally considered to be inferior. Jesus, however, lifted women up from degradation and servitude to the joy of fellowship and service. By allowing these women to travel with him, Jesus was showing that all people are equal under God. These women supported Jesus’ ministry with their own money. They owed a great debt to him because he had healed some of them and had cast out evil spirits from others. JESUS AND WOMEN; As a non-Jew recording the words and works of Jesus’ life, Luke demonstrated a special sensitivity to other “outsiders” with whom Jesus came into contact. For instance, Luke recorded five events involving women that are not mentioned in the other Gospels. In first-century Jewish culture, women were usually treated as second-class citizens, enjoying few of the rights that men had. But Jesus crossed those barriers, and Luke showed the special care of Jesus for women. Jesus respected all people equally.

The following passages tell of his encounters with women.

Jesus talks to a Samaritan woman at the well John 4:1–26
Jesus heals Peter’s mother-in-law John 4:1–26
Jesus raises a widow’s son from the dead Luke 7:11–17
A sinful woman anoints Jesus’ feet Luke 7:36–50
The adulterous woman whom Jesus forgave John 8:1–11
Women travel with Jesus Luke 8:1–3
Jesus heals a diseased woman Luke 8:43–48
Jesus visits Mary and Martha Luke 10:38–42
Jesus heals a crippled woman Luke 13:10–17
Jesus heals the daughter of a Gentile woman Mark 7:24–30
Weeping women follow Jesus on his way to the cross Luke 23:27–31
Jesus’ mother and other women gather at the cross John 19:25–27
Jesus appears to Mary Magdalene Mark 16:9–11
Jesus appears to other women after his resurrection Matthew 28:8–10

 

The Gospel names three of the women. First, Mary Magdalene (from a town called Magdala or Magadan, see Matthew 15:39) from whom he had cast out seven demons. Apparently Mary Magdalene had lived a very sorry existence because demons were usually associated with mental or physical disorders. The number of demons indicates the severity of the possession from which Jesus freed her. Although some have suggested that Mary Magdalene was a prostitute, there is no biblical evidence to support this. Mary stayed at the cross, went to the tomb, and was the first person to see the resurrected Christ (24:10; Mark 15:40, 47; 16:1, 9; John 19:25; 20:1, 18). Because she is always first in any list of women indicates that she probably had a special leadership role. The second woman named is Joanna, the wife of Chuza, who was Herod’s business manager (or steward). He may have been in charge of one of Herod Antipas’s estates. Joanna is also mentioned in 24:10 as one of the women, along with Mary Magdalene, who told the disciples the news of Jesus’ resurrection. Otherwise, nothing else is known of her; Joanna’s husband is mentioned only here. Perhaps Luke’s Gentile readers knew of this man and the exact nature of the office that he held. Some have conjectured that this may have been the man whose son was healed in Capernaum, recorded in John 4:46–53, after which he allowed his wife to be a part of Jesus’ supporters. But this is uncertain. Finally, Luke mentioned a woman named Susanna who is found nowhere else in Scripture and about whom nothing is known. Perhaps Luke highlighted these three women because they would have been known to his readers.

[It is common today to hear people criticize the Bible as a male-dominated, patriarchal document. There is no question that the major characters that populate the biblical landscape are overwhelmingly men, although there are notable exceptions. Ruth, Naomi, Queen Esther, and Deborah the judge are a few of them. But Luke’s Gospel in particular highlights the positive role that women played in Jesus’ public ministry. Jesus never denigrated women, never acted in a chauvinistic manner, never victimized women in any way. He showed them great respect and compassion, as he did others who were oppressed and downtrodden. When you meet those who are different than you—minorities, people of different economic levels, members of the opposite sex—show them the same dignity and compassion Jesus did].

Besides these women there were many others who were contributing from their own resources to support Jesus and his disciples. This provides an insight into how Jesus and his disciples met their basic needs. John 13:29 reveals that Jesus and the disciples had a common pool of money from which they bought food and gave to the poor and that Judas Iscariot acted as treasurer. This passage tells the origin of that pool of money. People, like the women listed here, gave money to Jesus and the disciples out of gratefulness for what Jesus had done for them. Note that, in the Gospels, no women ever reject Christ or become his enemies, only men. These women are models of the faith response that Christ desires. These same women also would witness Jesus’ crucifixion (23:49) and see the empty tomb (24:10, 22, 24). Luke revealed that they had been with Jesus from the time of his ministry in Galilee. He also wrote that women stayed close to Jesus and would have influential roles in the church (Acts 1:14; 8:12; 16:13–15; 17:4, 12; 18:24–26)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt 27:55-56 Many women were there, watching from a distance. They had followed Jesus from Galilee to care for his needs. 56 Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joses, and the mother of Zebedee's sons. RV60  Estaban allí muchas mujeres mirando de lejos,  las cuales habían seguido a Jesús desde Galilea,  sirviéndole,  (56)  entre las cuales estaban María Magdalena,  María la madre de Jacobo y de José,  y la madre de los hijos de Zebedeo.

            * Food ministry

“Mary Magdalene” was from Magdala, located on the southwestern shore of the Sea of Galilee. The Lord had delivered her from a bad case of demon-possession (Luke 8:2). She is the Mary who, after Christ’s resurrection, “stood at the tomb weeping” when Jesus, whom she took to be the gardener, appeared to her (John 20:11–18). She is definitely not the sinful woman of Luke 7. She seems to have been possessed of some wealth, Luke 8.2,3. Cf. 15.39, 26.7. There had been many people at the cross who had come only to mock and taunt Jesus or, like the religious leaders, to revel in their apparent victory. Some of Jesus’ faithful followers were at the cross as well. Among the disciples, only John was there, and he recorded in his Gospel in graphic detail the horror he observed. Many women were also there, looking on from a distance, perhaps out of custom or out of respect for the victims. Some of these women had come from Galilee with Jesus for the Passover. Mary Magdalene was from Magdala, a town near Capernaum in Galilee. She had been released from demon possession by Jesus (Luke 8:2). Another Mary is distinguished (from Mary Magdalene and Mary, Jesus’ mother) by the names of her sons who may have been well known in the early church. The mother of the sons of Zebedee was the mother of the disciples James and John. Her name was Salome (20:20–21), and she was probably the sister of Jesus’ mother. These women had been faithful to Jesus’ ministry, following him and providing for his material needs (Luke 8:1–3). John wrote that Jesus’ mother, Mary, was present and that, from the cross, Jesus spoke to John about taking care of Mary (John 19:25–27). These women could do very little. They couldn’t speak before the Sanhedrin in Jesus’ defense; they couldn’t appeal to Pilate; they couldn’t stand against the crowds; they couldn’t overpower the Roman guards. But they did what they could. They stayed at the cross when the disciples had not even come; they followed Jesus’ body to the tomb; they prepared spices for his body. Because these women used the opportunities they had, they were the first to witness the Resurrection. God blessed their devotion, initiative, and diligence. As believers, we should take advantage of the opportunities we have and do what we can for Christ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt.27:59-61 59  Joseph took the body, wrapped it in a clean linen cloth,  60  and placed it in his own new tomb that he had cut out of the rock. He rolled a big stone in front of the entrance to the tomb and went away. 61 Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were sitting there opposite the tomb. RV60  Y tomando José el cuerpo,  lo envolvió en una sábana limpia,  (60)  y lo puso en su sepulcro nuevo,  que había labrado en la peña;  y después de hacer rodar una gran piedra a la entrada del sepulcro,  se fue.  (61)  Y estaban allí María Magdalena,  y la otra María,  sentadas delante del sepulcro.

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Matthew noted that Mary Magdalene and the other Mary sat across from the tomb (27:61),

no doubt in mourning. Interestingly these women accompanied Jesus’ body right up to the minute it was buried, whereas Jesus’ disciples had all abandoned Him (26:56). See vv 55,56. “The other Mary” must be “Mary the mother of James and Joses.” They saw how the body of Jesus was carried into the new tomb which Joseph, who owned the garden in which it was located, had hewn out in the rock. It was a tomb that had never been used. The women also observed how a big stone had been rolled in front of the entrance of the tomb. Having seen all this, they departed. It is significant that the women are present at the crucifixion, the burial, and are the first at the tomb on the third day. Two of the women who had been at the cross (27:56) followed Joseph and Nicodemus as they carried Jesus’ body to the tomb. No mourning was permitted for those executed under Roman law, so they followed in silent grief. They wanted to know where the body would be laid because they planned to return after the Sabbath with their own spices to anoint Jesus’ body (28:1). Although the Jews placed little value on the testimony of women, these women actually saw Jesus’ body be buried and were the first to witness the Resurrection. They then brought the news to the disciples (28:8)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt.28:1 After the Sabbath, at dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to look at the tomb. 2 There was a violent earthquake, for an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and, going to the tomb, rolled back the stone and sat on it. RV60  Pasado el día de reposo,  al amanecer del primer día de la semana,  vinieron María Magdalena y la otra María,  a ver el sepulcro. 2 Y hubo un gran terremoto;  porque un ángel del Señor,  descendiendo del cielo y llegando,  removió la piedra,  y se sentó sobre ella.

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Sabbath officially ended with sundown on Saturday. At that time the women could purchase and prepare spices (Luke 24:1). The event described here occurred the next morning, at dawn on Sunday, the first day of the week. other Mary. The mother of James the Less (27:56). several women went to the tomb of Jesus. They knew where the Lord had been laid for they had seen Joseph and Nicodemus roll the stone over the door of the tomb (27:56). The women were returning to the tomb on Sunday morning, now that the Sabbath was over, to anoint Jesus’ body for burial (Mark 16:1). The Sabbath has come and gone (Mark 16:1). It is now Sunday morning at dawn. It is definitely the first day of the week. It was then that Mary Magdalene and “the other Mary,” that is “Mary the mother of James and Joses” (27:56, 61) came to look at the tomb. Matthew abbreviates. As in 27:61 so also here he mentions only these two. Mark adds Salome (16:1). Luke adds Joanna, and indicates that there were others (24:10). Though at this point John 20:1 mentions only Mary Magdalene, even that Gospel implies that other women had accompanied her (note 20:2: “We do not know”).There is no conflict between John’s story about Mary Magdalene, and Matthew’s about several women. Nor is there any conflict about the time when the women’s trip to the tomb took place. John 20:1 states, “while it was still dark,” Mark 16:2 “when the sun was risen,” Matthew 28:1 “at dawn,” Luke 24:1 “at early dawn.” Probable solution: although it was still dark when the women started out, the sun had risen when they arrived at the tomb. They came “to look at the tomb.” Here too Matthew summarizes. We must remember that Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus had already wound linen bandages around the body, strewing in a mixture of myrrh and aloes. However, the dead body had not as yet been anointed. Sometime after 6 P.M. on Saturday evening—hence, “when the sabbath was past”—the women had bought whatever was necessary to anoint the body. So now, very early Sunday morning, they come to the tomb to do this, in order to prevent rapid decomposition (Mark 16:1; Luke 24:1). It is true that they should have paid more attention to the Lord’s repeated prediction that he would rise again on the third day. On the other hand, while we may criticize their lack of sufficient faith—a lack which they shared with the male disciples—let us not overlook their exceptional love and loyalty. They were at Calvary when Jesus died, in Joseph’s garden when their Master was buried, and now very early in the morning, here they are once more, in order to look at the tomb; that is, to see to it that everything is in good order, and to anoint the body. Meanwhile, where were the eleven? Mark 16:3 informs us that on the way toward the tomb the women were worried about the stone. They said to each other, “Who will roll away the stone for us from the entrance of the tomb?” But suddenly they saw—probably at a turn in the path—that the heavy stone had already been removed (Mark 16:4). What had happened? It is remarkable that they did not believe in His resurrection when He had taught this truth repeatedly (Matt. 16:21; 17:23; 20:19; 26:32). The women could not make the trip to the tomb until after the Sabbath. As dawn approached, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary came to see the tomb. Both of them had been at Jesus’ cross and had followed Joseph so they would know where the tomb was located (27:56, 61). Mark also mentioned that Salome was with them; she had also been at the cross and was probably the mother of the disciples James and John. The women went home and kept the Sabbath as the law required, from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. Unlike the Jewish leaders, they certainly had no expectation that the disciples would steal the body (27:62–66). When the women arrived at daybreak on Sunday, the third day, Jesus had already risen. Mark explained that they had gone back to the tomb to bring spices and perfumes to anoint Jesus’ body because they had had no time to do so before the Sabbath (Mark 16:1). Anointing a body was a sign of love, devotion, and respect. Bringing spices to the tomb would be like bringing flowers to a grave today. Since they did not embalm bodies in Israel, they would use perfumes as a normal practice. The women undoubtedly knew that Joseph and Nicodemus had already wrapped the body in linen and spices. They probably were going to do a simple external application of the fragrant spices. Matthew, however, omitted the detail of their visit, explaining only that they came to see the tomb. After the Sabbath translates an unusual construction in the Greek, opse de sabbatōn. The phrase could also be rendered, “well after the Sabbath,” indicating that a considerable amount of time had elapsed since the Sabbath ended. The actual time was from sundown the previous evening, when the Sabbath had ended, until it began to dawn the following day, which was Sunday, the first day of the week, totaling perhaps ten hours. John states specifically that when the women came “it was still dark” (20:1). The first day of the week also translates an interesting Greek phrase, which literally means, “day one with reference to the Sabbath.” The Jews did not have names for days of the week, such as Monday, Tuesday, and so on, but simply numbered them in relation to the Sabbath. Sabbath means “seventh,” and, although it was at the end of the week, because it was the central and holy day, all other days were reckoned by it-as the first, second, third, and so forth, day after the Sabbath. As explained in the previous chapter of this volume, because Jews considered reference to “a day” as meaning any part of that day, Sunday was the third day of Jesus’ interment, the day which He had repeatedly predicted would be the day of His resurrection (Matt. 16:21; 17:23; 27:64; Mark 10:34; Luke 18:33). The phrase “after the Sabbath” could also refer figuratively to the new day of rest for God’s people. But the day before Jesus arose from the grave was the last divinely ordained Sabbath for His people, because on the following day the New Covenant in Jesus Christ was ushered in. That Sunday was the dawning not only of a new day but of a new era in redemptive history. It is because of the resurrection that Christians worship on Sunday rather than on the Sabbath. At that predawn hour on Sunday morning Mary Magdalene and the other Mary came to look at the grave. Although they had witnessed Joseph’s and Nicodemus’s wrapping Jesus’ body in the linen cloths and spices (Matt. 27:61), the women had secured and prepared their own spices (probably a small amount in comparison to that brought by Nicodemus) with which they would personally anoint the Lord (Luke 24:1). Although Salome, the mother of James and John and the wife of Zebedee (Mark 16:1; Matt. 27:56), and Joanna (Luke 24:10) were also there, Matthew focuses only on the two Marys. The other Mary was the mother of James and Joseph and the wife of Clopas (Matt. 27:56; John 19:25). The women obviously thought Jesus would still be in the grave and would remain there, or else they would not have brought the anointing spices. They had not come to see Jesus risen but to look at the grave where they expected His body to still be lying. They had been among the women who ministered to Jesus in Galilee and who had stood with Him at the cross (Matt. 27:55–56). Now they came to the garden hoping that somehow the great stone could be removed so they could minister to Him one last time (Mark 16:3). But despite their lack of faith in Jesus’ promises to rise on the third day, they came to the tomb out of deep affection for their Lord. Jewish tradition wrongly held that the spirit of a dead person left the body four days after death because by that time the body had become so disfigured by decay that the spirit could no longer recognize it. That tradition may be reflected in Martha’s comment to Jesus about her brother, Lazarus: “Lord, by this time there will be a stench, for he has been dead four days” (John 11:39). Perhaps the two Marys and the other women came to Jesus’ grave with the intent of anointing His body one more time before His spirit departed from it. The women did not have confidence in Jesus’ resurrection, but they had great love and great devotion for Him. What they lacked in faith they compensated for in loving compassion, and what they lacked in understanding they made up for in courageous devotion.

 

 

Mark 15:40 Some women were watching from a distance. Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James the younger and of Joses, and Salome. (RV60)  También había algunas mujeres mirando de lejos,  entre las cuales estaban María Magdalena,  María la madre de Jacobo el menor y de José,  y Salomé,

 

Mark 15:47 Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses saw where he was laid. (NBLH)  Y María Magdalena y María, la madre de José, miraban para saber dónde Lo ponían.

 

Mark 16:1 When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus' body. 2  Very early on the first day of the week, just after sunrise, they were on their way to the tomb 3  and they asked each other, "Who will roll the stone away from the entrance of the tomb?"  4  But when they looked up, they saw that the stone, which was very large, had been rolled away. RV60  Cuando pasó el día de reposo,  María Magdalena,  María la madre de Jacobo,  y Salomé,  compraron especias aromáticas para ir a ungirle.  (2)  Y muy de mañana,  el primer día de la semana,  vinieron al sepulcro,  ya salido el sol.  (3)  Pero decían entre sí:  ¿Quién nos removerá la piedra de la entrada del sepulcro?  (4)  Pero cuando miraron,  vieron removida la piedra,  que era muy grande.

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16:1 Sabbath was past. The Sabbath officially ended at sundown on Saturday, after which the women were able to purchase spices. Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome. See Matt. 27:56. John adds that Mary the mother of Jesus was there (John 19:26), and Luke mentions that Joanna and other women were also there (Luke 24:10; 15:41). spices. The women bought more spices in addition to those prepared earlier (Luke 23:56; John 19:39,40). anoint. Unlike the Egyptians, the Jewish people did not embalm their dead. Anointing was an act of love, to offset the stench of a decaying body. That the women came to anoint Jesus’ body on the third day after His burial showed that they, like the disciples, were not expecting Him to rise from the dead (8:31; 9:31; 10:34). 16:2 when the sun had risen. John 20:1 says that Mary Magdalene arrived at the tomb while it was still dark. She may have gone on ahead of the other women, or the whole party may have set out together while it was still dark and arrived at the tomb after sunrise. 16:3 Who will roll away the stone. Only Mark records this discussion on the way to the tomb. The women realized they had no men with them to move the heavy stone (v. 4) away from the entrance to the tomb. Since they had last visited the tomb on Friday evening, they did not know it had been sealed and a guard posted, which took place on Saturday (Matt. 27:62–66). 16:4 the stone had been rolled away. This was not to let Jesus out, but to let the witnesses in. The earthquake when the angel rolled away the stone (Matt. 28:2) may have affected only the area around the tomb, since the women apparently did not feel it. 16:1. The Sabbath, Saturday (Nisan 16), concluded at sunset and the new Jewish day, Sunday (Nisan 17), began. That evening after sunset the women who had witnessed Jesus’ death and burial (15:40, 47) bought spices, aromatic oils, to anoint Jesus’ body (lit., “Him”) the next morning. This indicates that they did not expect Jesus to rise from the dead (8:31; 9:31; 10:34). Spices were poured over a dead body to counteract the odor of decay and as a symbolic expression of loving devotion. Embalming was not a Jewish custom. 2-3. Very early on the first day of the week (Sunday, Nisan 17) just after sunrise the women went to the tomb. They left home while it was still dark (John 20:1) and got to the tomb shortly after sunrise. Two of them knew that a large stone had been rolled in front of the tomb’s entrance (Mark 15:47). Only Mark recorded their concern over the practical problem of getting it rolled back. Evidently they were not aware of the official sealing of the tomb or the posting of a guard (Matt. 27:62-66). 4-5. When the women arrived on the scene, they looked up toward the tomb and immediately noticed that the stone . . . had been removed, for (gar; 1:16) it was very large and thus easily seen. The women entered the tomb’s outer room that led to the inner burial chamber. They were startled to see a young man (neaniskon; 14:51) sitting to their right probably in front of the burial chamber. The unique circumstances, the accompanying description, and the revelatory message (16:6-7) indicate that Mark viewed him as an angelic messenger sent from God even though Mark called him a young man, as he appeared to the women. The white robe pictured his heavenly origin and splendor (9:3). Luke (24:3-4) and John (20:12) mentioned the presence of two angels, the number necessary for a valid witness (Deut. 17:6); but Matthew (28:5) and Mark referred to only one, presumably the spokesman. The women were alarmed (exethambēthēsan; Mark 9:15; 14:33) when they encountered the divine messenger. This compound verb of strong emotion (used only by Mark in the NT), expresses overwhelming distress at what is highly unusual (16:8). When you combine the accounts in the Gospels, you arrive at the following probable order of Resurrection appearances on that first day of the week:

(1) to Mary Magdalene (John 20:11–18 and Mark 16:9–11),

(2) to the other women (Matt. 28:9–10),

(3) to Peter (Luke 24:34 and 1 Cor. 15:5),

(4) to the two men going to Emmaus (Mark 16:12 and Luke 24:13–32), and

(5) to ten of the disciples in the Upper Room (Mark 16:14 and John 20:19–25).

It was still dark when Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, Salome, and Joanna (Luke 24:10) started out for the tomb (John 20:1); and they arrived at early dawn (Luke 24:1). Their first surprise was finding the stone already rolled away from the door (Matt. 28:2–4) so that they were able to enter into the tomb. The second surprise was meeting two angels in the tomb (Luke 24:4; Mark focused on only one angel); and the third surprise was hearing the message they delivered. No wonder the women were amazed! The message was that Jesus was not there: He had risen from the dead, and He was going before them into Galilee where He would meet them. The women were the first messengers of the glorious Resurrection message! Note that there was a special word of encouragement for Peter (Mark 16:7), and keep in mind that Mark wrote his Gospel with Peter’s assistance. Mary Magdalene ran to tell Peter and John what she had discovered (John 20:2–10), and then she lingered at the tomb after they left. It was then that Jesus appeared to her (John 20:11–18). From her conversation with Jesus, it seems that Mary did not fully grasp what the angels had said, but she was the first believer to see the risen Christ. Mark 16:8 may give the idea that all the women fled, but Mark 16:9 states that Mary met Jesus personally. After He appeared to Mary, Jesus met the other women as they were on their way to report their conversation with Jesus to the disciples (Matt. 28:9–10). Initially, the women were both joyful and afraid, but after they met the risen Christ, they found the disciples and shared the good news (Matt. 28:8). It is one thing to hear the message and quite something else to meet the risen Lord personally. When you meet Him, you have something to share with others. The emphasis in Mark 16:9–14 is on the unbelief of the disciples who were mourning and weeping instead of rejoicing at the good news. Was it because they were prejudiced against the witness of the women? Perhaps, for the testimony of a woman was not accepted in a Jewish court. But even when the two Emmaus disciples gave their witness, not everybody believed. Compare Mark 16:13 with Luke 24:33–35. Apparently there was division in the Upper Room until Jesus Himself appeared. Christians can look very different from one another, and they can hold widely varying beliefs about politics, lifestyle, and even theology. But one central belief unites and inspires all true Christians—Jesus Christ rose from the dead! 16:1 When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus’ body. Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of James and Joses had been at Jesus’ cross and had followed Joseph, who took Jesus’ body to the tomb, so that they would know where he had been laid (15:47). Salome had also been at the cross; she was probably the mother of the disciples James and John. The women went home and kept the Sabbath as the law required, from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. So they bought and prepared their spices and perfumes before returning to the tomb early Sunday morning, for they could not do so on the Sabbath. Anointing a body was a sign of love, devotion, and respect. Bringing spices to the tomb would be like bringing flowers to a grave today. Since they did not embalm bodies in Israel, they would use perfumes as a normal practice. The women undoubtedly knew that Joseph and Nicodemus had already wrapped the body in linen and spices. They probably were going to do a simple external application of the fragrant spices.These three women faced three overwhelming problems as they set out to honor Jesus’ body.

First, the soldier guard would prevent them; second, the rock in the tomb’s doorway would be too heavy to move; and third, Jesus’ body would have begun to decompose. Against such obstacles, what could these three women expect to accomplish? Yet urged on by love and gratitude, they were determined to do what they could. The church’s mission—to send the gospel to all the world—is fraught with overwhelming problems. Any one of them appears devastating. Against human stubbornness, disease, danger, loneliness, sin, greed, and even church strife and corruption, what can a few missionaries accomplish? Yet like these solitary women on that Sunday morning, we go out with love and gratitude for Jesus and leave the big obstacles with God. Some scholars have argued that this could not be factual, for no one would have anointed a three-day-old corpse. Others had noted that the cool air of early spring in mountainous Jerusalem would have delayed deterioration of the body. But these women had experienced their Master’s mercy and were full of gratitude for what he had done. Since Jesus’ body was buried so rapidly after he was crucified, they had been unable to perform the anointing before Jesus’ burial. All these women could think about was getting their spices and perfumes to the burial site.16:2 Very early in the morning, on the first day of the week, they came to the tomb when the sun had risen. Sabbath had ended at sundown on Saturday, so very early on Sunday morning while it was still dark (John 20:1), the women left their homes, arriving at the tomb just as the sun was rising. They wasted no time. This further illustrates their mis understanding of Jesus. He had told them that he would rise from the dead, yet they expected nothing. 16:3 And they said among themselves, “Who will roll away the stone from the door of the tomb for us?” Two of these women, Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses, had seen where the body had been placed and knew that a huge stone had been rolled across the entrance to the tomb (15:46). Apparently, they were unaware that the tomb had been sealed and a guard set outside it (Matthew 27:62–66). So as they approached the tomb, they remembered that the stone would be a problem. They wondered aloud who might be able to roll it aside so that they could get in. Yet their faith pushed them on; they believed that God would provide a way. 16:4 When they looked up, they saw that the stone, which was very large, had already been rolled back. The women needn’t have worried about the stone. Jesus had said he would rise again after three days. In the Jewish reckoning of time, a day included any part of a day; thus, Friday was the first day, Saturday was the second day, and Sunday was the third day. When the women arrived at daybreak, Jesus had already risen. When they arrived at the tomb, they looked up (some tombs were carved into the hillside) and saw that the large stone had already been rolled aside. Matthew records that there had been an earthquake and an angel of the Lord had descended from heaven, had rolled back the stone, and had sat on it. The stone was not rolled away so that Jesus could get out, for he was already gone. It was rolled aside so others could get in and see for themselves that Jesus had indeed risen from the dead, just as he had said. GOD IN FRONT When problems appear too strong to handle and you feel like quitting, remember that God is way out in front, already blazing a trail for you. When you are so preoccupied by problems that you don’t even take time to pray, as perhaps happened to these women, God still guides your way. Does a stone block your way, a stone too heavy to budge? Keep going and trusting. God moves big stones easily. Don’t balk at insurmountable problems; remember that God often prepares the way.

Mark 16:9  When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons. 10 She went and told those who had been with him and who were mourning and weeping. 11 When they heard that Jesus was alive and that she had seen him, they did not believe it. RV60  Habiendo,  pues,  resucitado Jesús por la mañana,  el primer día de la semana,  apareció primeramente a María Magdalena,  de quien había echado siete demonios.  (10)  Yendo ella,  lo hizo saber a los que habían estado con él,  que estaban tristes y llorando.  (11)  Ellos,  cuando oyeron que vivía,  y que había sido visto por ella,  no lo creyeron.

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After the women had told the disciples about the Resurrection, and Peter and another disciple (presumably John) had gone to see for themselves (John 20:3–9), Mary Magdalene apparently had returned to the tomb. Peter and John had gone home amazed, but Mary “stood outside the tomb crying” (John 20:11).Although Mary Magdalene has been mentioned earlier in this Gospel as one of the women at the cross and at the tomb (15:40, 47; 16:1), Mark reminded his readers of the reason for her devotion to Jesus: He had cast seven demons from her (see also Luke 8:2). The specifics of that particular healing are not recorded in any of the Gospels, although several accounts of Jesus casting out demons show the extreme horror of demon possession. It was to this devoted and sorrowful woman that Jesus made his first appearance after the Resurrection.

We don’t know why Mary was chosen as the first, but that fact should be very encouraging. She was a sinner, a woman with a severely troubled past. Yet her simple faith, courage, and love mark her as praiseworthy, not just for her quiet faith, but for her love in action. John recorded that Mary didn’t recognize Jesus at first. Her grief had blinded her; she couldn’t see him because she didn’t expect to see him. Then he spoke her name, and immediately she recognized him. Imagine the love that flooded her heart when she heard her Savior saying her name (John 20:16). Jesus told Mary to return and tell the disciples. Christ’s Singular Kindness to Mary Magdalene Second, let us mark in these verses our Lord Jesus Christ’s singular kindness to Mary Magdalene. We are told that “When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons” (verse 9). To her before all other descendants of Adam was granted the privilege of being first to behold a risen Saviour. Mary, the mother of our Lord, was still alive. John, the beloved disciple, was still on earth. Yet both were passed over on this occasion in favor of Mary Magdalene. A woman who at one time had probably been chief of sinners, a woman who at one time had been possessed by seven demons, was the first to whom Jesus showed himself alive when he rose victorious from the tomb. The fact is remarkable, and full of instruction.

[There is nothing in the New Testament to justify the common notion that Mary Magdalene had been a sinner against the seventh commandment more than other commandments. There is no scriptural warrant for calling hospitals and asylums intended for fallen women “Magdalene Hospitals.” No better authority can be discovered for the common idea on the subject than tradition. At the same time it is only fair to say that there seems strong probability for supposing that the sins of Mary Magdalene had been very great. There was probably some grave cause for her being possessed by seven demons, though the nature of it has not been revealed to us.] We need not doubt, for one thing, that by appearing “first to Mary Magdalene” our Lord meant to show us how much he values love and faithfulness. Last at the cross and first at the grave, last to confess her Master while living, and first to honor him when dead, this warm-hearted disciple was allowed to be the first to see him when the victory was won. It was intended to be a perpetual memorial to the church that those who do honor Christ, he will honor, and that those who do much for him on earth will find him even on earth doing much for them. May we never forget this. May we always remember that for those who leave all for Christ’s sake there is “a hundred times as much in this present age” (Mark 10:30). We need not doubt, for another thing, that our Lord’s appearing “first to Mary Magdalene” was intended to comfort all who have become penitent believers after having run into great excesses of sin. It was meant to show us that, however far we may have fallen, we are raised to complete peace with God if we repent and believe the Gospel. Though before far off, we are brought near. Though before enemies, we are made dear children. The old has gone, the new has come (2 Corinthians 5:17). The blood of Christ makes us completely clean in God’s sight. We may have begun like Augustine, and John Newton, and been ringleaders in every kind of iniquity. But once brought to Christ, we need not doubt that all is forgiven. We may come near boldly, and have access with confidence. Our sins and iniquities, like those of Mary Magdalene, are remembered no more. Weakness in the Faith of the Best Christians. Third, let us note in these verses how much weakness there is sometimes in the faith of the best Christians. Three times in this very passage we find St. Mark describing the unbelief of the eleven apostles. Once, when Mary Magdalene told them that our Lord had risen, “they did not believe it” (verse 11). Again, when our Lord had appeared to two of them as they walked, we read of the rest of them, “they did not believe them either” (verse 13). Finally, when our Lord himself appeared to them as they were eating, we are told that “he rebuked them for their lack of faith and their stubborn refusal to believe” (verse 14). Never perhaps was there so striking an example of people’s unwillingness to believe what runs counter to their early prejudices. Never was there so remarkable a proof of people’s forgetfulness of plain teaching. These eleven men had been told repeatedly by our Lord that he would rise again. And yet, when the time came, all was forgotten, and they were found unbelieving.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luke 8:1-3  After this, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The Twelve were with him,  2  and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out;  3  Joanna the wife of Cuza, the manager of Herod's household; Susanna; and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means. RV60  Aconteció después,  que Jesús iba por todas las ciudades y aldeas,  predicando y anunciando el evangelio del reino de Dios,  y los doce con él,  (2)  y algunas mujeres que habían sido sanadas de espíritus malos y de enfermedades:  María,  que se llamaba Magdalena,  de la que habían salido siete demonios,  (3)  Juana,  mujer de Chuza intendente de Herodes,  y Susana,  y otras muchas que le servían de sus bienes. [NBLH  que de sus bienes personales contribuían al sostenimiento de ellos].

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certain women. Rabbis normally did not have women as disciples. Mary called Magdalene. Her name probably derives from the Galilean town of Magdala. Some believe she is the woman described in 7:37–50, but it seems highly unlikely that Luke would introduce her here by name for the first time if she were the main figure in the account he just completed. Also, while it is clear that she had suffered at the hands of “demons,” there is no reason whatsoever to think that she had ever been a prostitute. Much as the woman had responded positively to Jesus, in contrast with Simon the Pharisee (7:36-50), so others responded positively to the message of the kingdom which Jesus was proclaiming and some responded negatively (8:4-15). The believers included the Twelve and a number of women who had been recipients of Jesus’ healing power, including Mary (called Magdalene; i.e., Mary from Magdala in Galilee) from whom seven demons had come out. Often in Scripture the number seven is used to denote completion. Apparently Mary had been totally demon-possessed. Joanna, who was the wife of one of Herod’s officials, was also singled out, as was Susanna. These three and many other women were helping to support them (Jesus and the Twelve) out of their own means. This would have been viewed as a scandalous situation in Palestine in that day. However, like the forgiven woman (7:36-50), these women had also been forgiven much and they loved much. They were responding positively to Jesus’ message about His kingdom. The fact that Mary called Magdalene is introduced here as though for the first time makes it unlikely that she was the sinful woman of 7:36–50. Mary Magdalene is also distinct from Mary of Bethany in John 12:3. Joanna the wife of Chuza, Herod’s steward: News of Jesus had reached Herod’s palace. provided for Him from their substance: This is an example of how some women of means used their wealth to benefit the work of God. These women, then, had been the objects of Christ’s special care. Jesus had cured them of (a) evil spirits and (b) diseases. Note how carefully Dr. Luke distinguishes between the two, and see further on 4:33, 34. See also N.T.C. on Matt., pp. 436–438; and on Mark, pp. 64, 65. It is important to observe that while Socrates, Aristotle, Demosthenes, the rabbis, and the men of the Qumran community held women in low esteem, Jesus, in harmony with the teaching of the Old Testament, assigns a place of high honor to them. Moreover, it is especially in the Gospel According to Luke that the Savior’s tender and profound regard for women is emphasized. First among the women here mentioned is Mary called Magdalene; that is, Mary of Magdala (meaning The Tower) located on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee and south of Capernaum. She figures very prominently in all the four Passion accounts. She was one of the women who later: (a) watched the crucifixion (Matt. 27:55, 56; Mark 15:40; John 19:25); (b) saw where Christ’s body was laid (Matt. 27:61; Mark 15:47; Luke 23:55); and (c) very early Sunday morning started out from their homes in order to anoint the body of the Lord (Matt. 28:1; Mark 16:1; Luke 24:10). Besides, she was going to be the first person to whom the Risen Christ would appear (John 20:1–18; see also Mark’s disputed ending, 16:9). The item about the seven demons that had been expelled from Mary Magdalene has led to the wholly unjustifiable conclusion that she was at one time a very bad woman, a terribly immoral person. But there is not even an inkling of proof for the supposition that demon-possession and immorality go hand in hand. Weird and pitiable mental and/or physical behavior are, indeed, often associated with demon-possession (Luke 4:33, 34; 8:27–29; 9:37–43, and parallels), not immorality. As to Joanna wife of Chuza, manager of Herod’s household, she, too, was among the women who were to hear the glad tidings, “He is not here, but is risen” (Luke 24:6, 10). The significance of Luke’s reference to her has already been pointed out. It is Luke alone who refers to her (8:3; 24:10). About Susanna, mentioned only here in Luke 8:3, nothing further is known. Her name should not be forgotten, however. Her deeds of kindness toward her Lord and his disciples were pure and fragrant and accordingly resemble a beautiful “lily” (the meaning of her name). We are happy to read that in addition to the three women here mentioned “there were many others.” What we have here, therefore, is a genuine Ladies’ Aid. The New Testament records the attitudes and deeds of certain foolish and sometimes even wicked girls and women, real or imagined (Matt. 10:34, 35; 14:1–12; 25:2, 3; Acts 5:1, 2, 7–11; Rom. 1:26; II Tim. 3:6, 7; Rev. 2:20–23), so that the statement sometimes made, namely, that females never took a stand against Jesus or his cause is in need of careful circumscription. Nevertheless, it is a fact that, with very few exceptions, the girls and women mentioned or referred to in the New Testament were on the side of the Lord. By and large it is true that though Peter denied Christ, and Judas betrayed him, and Herod mocked him, and Pilate condemned him, the women honored him and ministered to his and to his disciples’ needs. To the extent to which they did this, the comforting words of Matt. 25:34–40 are certainly applicable to them. In order to stress their importance, Luke gives his readers the names of these women (no men are named): Mary, who was called Magdalene because she was from the village of Magdala; Joanna, the wife of Cuza, the manager of Herod’s household; Susanna, and many others. These women Jesus has cured of demons and diseases, and they have responded in a model fashion. They now follow Jesus and do what Jesus has asked his followers to do. These women were helping to support Jesus and the twelve out of their own means. The proper use of wealth will be a major theme in the coming chapters. These women are shown to be prime examples of how disciples ought to use their wealth. They give it to those in need. Some of the best, if not the best, role models for disciples in Luke are women (thus far Elizabeth, Mary, Anna, the sinful woman of 7:37, and now these women). Because of the centuries that have passed since Jesus walked the earth, it is hard for us to appreciate how revolutionary Luke’s picture of Jesus’ ministry is. Women’s involvement in supporting Jesus’ ministry is an example. Though some wealthy women supported religious figures in ancient times (Josephus Antiquities 17.2.4 §§41–44), it was unusual for them to be as involved as the women in this passage are with Jesus. In fact, this passage is one of several unique to Luke that focus on women (others include 1:5–39, Elizabeth; 2:36–38, Anna the prophetess; 7:36–50, the sinful woman; 10:38–42, Martha and Mary; 13:10–17, the healing of the crippled woman; 15:8–10, the parable of the woman with the lost coin; 18:1–8, the parable of the woman and the judge). Many men of the time believed that women were not even to be seen, much less heard. In a later Jewish text, t. Berakot 7:18, one leader rejoiced that he was not a pagan, a woman or unlearned (Fitzmyer 1981:696). In contrast, Luke and the New Testament declare that women have equal access to the blessings of grace and salvation. Whatever distinctions the Bible makes between male and female roles, there is no distinction when it comes to being coheirs in grace (Gal 3:28–29; 1 Pet 3:7). This small summary paragraph is important not only because women are included but also because of the variety of women mentioned. Mary called Magdalene ministered in response to Jesus’ healing ministry. His exorcism of demons from her had drawn her to him. Though from the time of Gregory the Great she has had the reputation of a sinful woman, this text gives no indication that she was immoral. Joanna was the wife of a major political figure, Chuza, who served as Herod’s steward. Thus Luke shows that Jesus’ message had reached the highest social stratum, the palace. We are not told anything about Susanna. All these women contributed their resources to Jesus’ ministry. Their hearts were sensitive to God’s work, and they expressed this sensitivity through their generosity. When this discussion of women is set next to that of the sinful woman in 7:36–50, it is clear that Jesus’ ministry spanned social backgrounds as well as moral backgrounds. It is striking that here the women’s response took the concrete form of support. Just as in the OT the whole nation was to support the priests, so these women, as beneficiaries of God’s grace, gave to support Jesus’ ministry. Receiving should lead to giving Luke gives more attention to women than any other Gospel. Women played a special role in the life and ministry of Jesus (see the chart, “Jesus and Women” on page 194). Jesus’ acceptance of women as disciples and as participants in his ministry and teaching gave women a positive place in the NT church (Acts 1:14). Women traveling with Jesus and his disciples would have been completely uncharacteristic of rabbis in ancient times. Rabbis refused to teach women because they were generally considered to be inferior. Jesus, however, lifted women up from degradation and servitude to the joy of fellowship and service. By allowing these women to travel with him, Jesus was showing that all people are equal under God. These women supported Jesus’ ministry with their own money. They owed a great debt to him because he had healed some of them and had cast out evil spirits from others. God’s grace and Christ’s love. Let us notice, second, from these verses the power of God’s grace and the constraining influence of Christ’s love. We read that among those who followed our Lord on his travels were some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases (verse 2). We can imagine that the difficulties these holy women had to face in becoming Christ’s disciples were neither few nor small. They had their full share of the contempt and scorn which was poured on all followers of Jesus by the scribes and Pharisees. But they did not turn back. They were prepared to endure a great deal for the Lord’s sake because they were so grateful to have received mercy from his hands. They were enabled to stay with Jesus and not to give up because of the inner power of the Holy Spirit. And how wonderfully they stayed with Jesus to the end. It was not a woman who sold our Lord for 30 silver coins. It was not a woman who fled from the Lord in the garden of Gethsemane. It was not a woman who denied him three times in the high priest’s house. But they were women who wailed and lamented when Jesus was led out to be crucified. They were women who stood by the cross to the end. And they were women who first visited the grave where the Lord had been laid. Great indeed is the power of the grace of God. The special privilege which our Lord grants to his faithful followers. Let us note, lastly, from these verses the special privilege which our Lord grants to his faithful followers. We read that those who accompanied him on his travels helped to support him out of their own means (v3). Of course, he did not need their help ( Ps 50:10). The mighty Saviour who could multiply a few loaves and fish into food for thousands could have called from the earth as much food as he required. But he did not do so, for two reasons. First, he wanted to show us that he was human like us in everything except for sin and that he lived the life of faith through his Father’s providence. Second, by allowing his followers to minister to him, he proved their love. True love will count it a pleasure to give anything to the object loved. False love will often talk and profess a great deal but do and give nothing. This topic of ministering to Christ opens up a most important train of thought, and one which we will do well to consider. The Lord Jesus Christ is continually testing his church today. No doubt it would be easy for him to convert the Chinese or Hindus in a moment, but he does not do so. He is pleased to work through means. He condescends to use the agency of missionaries and the foolishness of man’s preaching in order to spread his Gospel. And in doing this, he is continually testing the faith and zeal of the churches. He lets Christians be fellow-workers with him, that he may prove who has a will to minister and who has none. He lets the spread of the Gospel be carried on through contributions to religious societies, that he may prove who are covetous and unbelieving and who are truly rich toward God. In short, the visible church of Christ may be divided into two parties—those who minister to Christ and those who do not (Matt 25:42).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luke 24:1  On the first day of the week, very early in the morning, the women took the spices they had prepared and went to the tomb.  2  They found the stone rolled away from the tomb,  3  but when they entered, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus.  4  While they were wondering about this, suddenly two men in clothes that gleamed like lightning stood beside them.  5  In their fright the women bowed down with their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, "Why do you look for the living among the dead?  6  He is not here; he has risen! Remember how he told you, while he was still with you in Galilee:  7  `The Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, be crucified and on the third day be raised again.'"  8  Then they remembered his words.  9  When they came back from the tomb, they told all these things to the Eleven and to all the others. 

 

Luke 24:10 It was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the others with them who told this to the apostles. 11  But they did not believe the women, because their words seemed to them like nonsense. (RV60)  Eran María Magdalena,  y Juana,  y María madre de Jacobo,  y las demás con ellas,  quienes dijeron estas cosas a los apóstoles. 11  Mas a ellos les parecían locura [tonteria] las palabras de ellas,  y no las creían.

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Perplexed Hearts: He Opens the Tomb (Luke 24:1–12) We do not know at what time Jesus arose from the dead on the first day of the week, but it must have been very early. The earthquake and the angel (Matt. 28:2–4) opened the tomb, not to let Jesus out but to let the witnesses in. “COME AND SEE, GO AND TELL!” IS THE RESURRECTION MANDATE FOR THE CHURCH.  Mary Magdalene had been especially helped by Jesus and was devoted to Him (Luke 8:2). She had lingered at the cross (Mark 15:47), and then she was first at the tomb. With her were Mary the mother of James; Joanna; and other devout women (Luke 24:10), hoping to finish preparing their Lord’s body for burial. It was a sad labor of love that was transformed into gladness when they discovered that Jesus was alive. “Who will roll the stone away?” was their main concern. The Roman soldiers would not break the Roman seal, especially for a group of mourning Jewish women. But God had solved the problem for them; the tomb was open and there was no body to prepare! At this point two angels appeared on the scene. Matthew 28:2 and Mark 16:5 mention only one of the two, the one who gave the message to the women. There was a kind rebuke in his message as he reminded them of their bad memories! More than once, Jesus had told His followers that He would suffer and die and be raised from the dead (Matt. 16:21; 17:22–23; 20:17–19; Luke 9:22, 44; 18:31–34). How sad it is when God’s people forget His Word and live defeated lives. Today, the Spirit of God assists us to remember His Word (John 14:26). Obedient to their commission, the women ran to tell the disciples the good news, but the men did not believe them! (According to Mark 16:14, Jesus later rebuked them for their unbelief.) Mary Magdalene asked Peter and John to come to examine the tomb (John 20:1–10), and they too saw the proof that Jesus was not there. However, all that the evidence said was that the body was gone and that apparently there had been no violence. As Mary lingered by the tomb weeping, Jesus Himself appeared to her (John 20:11–18). It is one thing to see the empty tomb and the empty graveclothes, but quite something else to meet the risen Christ. We today cannot see the evidence in the tomb, but we do have the testimony of the witnesses found in the inspired Word of God. And we can live out our faith in Jesus Christ and know personally that He is alive in us (Gal. 2:20). Keep in mind that these women did not expect to see Jesus alive. They had forgotten His resurrection promises and went to the tomb only to finish anointing His body. To say that they had hallucinations and only thought they saw Jesus is to fly in the face of the evidence. And would this many people hallucinate about the same thing at the same time? Not likely. They became excited witnesses, even to their leaders, that Jesus Christ is alive! 24:10 Mary Magdalene. See 8:2. She was the first to see Jesus alive (Mark 16:9; John 20:11–18). See v. 4. Joanna. Her husband was Herod’s steward. See 8:3. Mary the mother of James. See Matt. 27:56. the other women. They are never explicitly identified (23:49, 55).24:11 idle tales. I.e., nonsense. 10-12. The apostles did not believe the report the women brought them because their words seemed . . . like nonsense. This was because they had seen Jesus’ death and had seen His body placed in the grave. But Peter ran to the tomb and found what the women had described. Still he did not understand what had happened. 24:10 Three women are named: Mary Magdalene (8:2; Matt. 28:1; Mark 16:1; John 20:1), Joanna (8:3), and Mary the mother of James (Mark 15:40; 16:1). Other women also joined in the report of Jesus’ resurrection. Mary, the last one at the Cross and the first one at the tomb, was given the privilege of relaying the first resurrection message. 11 Skepticism reigned among the disciples. It is clear that they did not expect a resurrection. they did not believe: The disciples thought the women’s story was nonsense. 24:10–11 The women who went to the tomb were Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and several others. They told the apostles what had happened, but the story sounded like nonsense, so they didn’t believe it. The women are named here, probably because some of the later believers may have known them or about them. Mary Magdalene had been a loyal follower—Jesus had cast seven demons out of her (8:2). All the Gospels place her at the cross and at the tomb. Jesus’ first appearance to any human after his resurrection was to this woman (Mark 16:9; John 20:11–16). Joanna was previously mentioned among the women who followed Jesus (8:3). Mary the mother of James is also mentioned in Mark 15:40; 16:1 (she may be “the other Mary” of Matthew 28:1). The several others include Salome (Mark 16:1) and other unnamed persons—all women. They brought their story back to the apostles—giving them the message that the angel had told them: “He has risen from the dead and is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him” (Matthew 28:7). The fact that the message was carried by women gives credibility and persuasive force to Luke’s account. No ancient person making up such a story would have women as the official witnesses. By Jewish law, women could not do so. Amazingly, the disciples did not believe it—the story sounded like nonsense. Apparently Jesus’ words about dying and rising again had gone past all of them, or they somehow had interpreted the words figuratively rather than literally. Jesus’ arrest and death had stunned them all; their disloyalty to him had humiliated them. Their last two days had been spent together in hiding as they tried to sort through what had happened. Peter must have told them about his experience in the high priest’s courtyard and his blatant denials. Judas had killed himself. Jesus had been executed. Had they been completely duped? What was going on? Then these women arrived on the scene, sounding as though they had gone over the edge—empty tomb? angels? Perhaps these women hoped too much. Perhaps they merely had gone to the wrong tomb. It should not be surprising, then, that the eleven men didn’t believe it. And they certainly were not going to make the trip to Galilee on the words of these women who supposedly had received the message from two men at the tomb who looked like angels! Many skeptics have tried to write off the Resurrection as a story made up by a group of overzealous disciples. But here the opposite occurred. The disciples were not anxiously looking for any reason to believe that Jesus had risen; in fact, they were not anticipating it. When told of the Resurrection, they refused to believe without concrete evidence. Even a missing body was not enough to convince them.

 

John 19:25  Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. (RV60)  Estaban junto a la cruz de Jesús su madre,  y la hermana de su madre,  María mujer de Cleofas,  y María Magdalena.

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Although the exact number of women mentioned here is questioned, John probably refers to 4 women rather than 3, i.e., two by name and two without naming them: 1) "His mother" (Mary); 2) "His mother’s sister" (probably Salome [Mark 15:40] the sister of Mary and mother of James and John, the sons of Zebedee [Matt. 27:56, 57; Mark 15:40]); 3) "Mary the wife of Cleopas" (the mother of James the younger and Joses-Matt. 27:56); and 4) Mary Magdalene ("Magdalene" signifies "Magdala" a village on the W shore of Galilee, 2 or 3 mi. N of Tiberias). Mary Magdalene figures prominently in the resurrection account (see 20:1–18; cf. Luke 8:2, 3 where Jesus healed her from demon possession) In stark contrast with the cruelty and indifference of the soldiers, a group of four women watched with love and grief. The anguish of Jesus’ mother fulfilled a prophecy of Simeon: “A sword will pierce your own soul too” (Luke 2:35). Seeing her sorrow Jesus honored His mother by consigning her into the care of John, the beloved disciple. His brothers and sisters being in Galilee, were not in a position to care for or comfort her. The words of Jesus to Mary and the beloved disciple were His third saying from the cross (the first one recorded by John). In the other Gospels Jesus had already given a respite to the Roman executioners (Luke 23:24) and a pardon to one thief (Luke 23:42-43). 25. Now there were standing near the cross of Jesus his mother, and his mother’s sister, Mary the (wife) of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. From among the many women (Matt. 27:55) that were standing near (see on 14:23, footnote ) — but not too near (see Matt. 27:55; Mark 15:40; Luke 23:49: “afar off”) — the cross of Jesus, John selects four for special consideration.

It is interesting to compare John’s list with similar lists in Matthew and Mark:

Matthew 27:56 Mark 15:40 John 19:25
1. Mary Magdalene 1. Mary Magdalene 1. His Mother
2. Mary the mother of James and Joses 2. Mary the mother of James the Less and of Joses 2. His mother’s sister
3. The mother of the sons of Zebedee 3. Salome 3. Mary the (wife probably) of Clopas
    4. Mary Magdalene

Why just these four are mentioned here in 19:25 has not been revealed. It is not improbable that they stood in closer relation to the Lord than other women. Thus, for example, the mother of Jesus is mentioned, and also the mother of the sons of Zebedee (who were disciples of Jesus, belonging to the inner three). A comparison between Matthew’s list and that of Mark would seem to indicate that the name of the mother of James and John was Salome. We cannot accept the theory according to which John mentions only three women. If that were true, two sisters (Jesus’ mother and his aunt) would have the same first name (Mary). Besides, in that case John, though not mentioning by name the mother of Jesus, would not only mention by name her sister but would also inform the readers that she stood in some relation to Clopas (being probably his wife). This is not at all reasonable. Far more likely to be correct is the view that “the mother of the sons of Zebedee” and “Salome” and “his mother’s sister” were the same person. It may even be that the three lists are identical, with the one exception, namely, that John adds the mother of Jesus (without mentioning her by name). If this be true, we get the following harmony: The mother of Jesus. Her sister, who according to Mark was Salome, the mother of James and of the author of John. Mary, the wife of Clopas. She — if this harmony be correct — is the mother of James the Less and of Joses. Mary Magdalene. It must be stressed, however, that this harmony, though not improbable, cannot be proved.Taking these four in the order named, and assuming the harmony given to be correct, the New Testament references to them are as follows:

(1) The mother of Jesus. Her name was Mary. She was the wife of Joseph. Other references to her are found in the following passages: Matt. 1:16, 18, 20; 2:11; 13:55; Mark 6:3; Luke 1:27, 30, 34, 38, 39, 41, 46, 56; 2:5, 16, 19, 34; John 2:1, 3, 5, 12; 6:42; 19:25, 26, 27; Acts 1:14. See also Vol. I, pp. 113–121, 238. (2) Salome. See Matt. 27:56; Mark 15:40; 16:1; John 19:25.

(3) Mary, the wife of Clopas. See Matt. 27:56, 61; 28:1; Mark 15:40, 47; 16:1; Luke 24:10; John 19:25. (4) Mary Magdalene. See Matt. 27:56, 61; 28:1; Mark 15:40, 47; 16:1, 9; Luke 8:2; 24:10; John 19:25; 20:1, 2, 11–18. While hardly anything is known about Salome and Mary, the wife of Clopas, more has been recorded with reference to Mary Magdalene. She resided at Magdala, located on the s.w. coast of the Sea of Galilee. Jesus had performed a wonderful act of mercy, having cast seven demons out of her. Hence, it is not surprising that she became a most grateful disciple of the Lord. (Incidentally, she was not the woman of ill repute, whose story is recorded in Luke 7:36–50. The identification does her an injustice.) She was one of those women who, having once become a follower of Jesus, helped him in his ministry by giving him of her substance. We are not surprised to find her at the cross, at the tomb when Jesus was buried (together with Mary, the wife of Clopas), and again at the tomb on the third day (together with Mary, the wife of Clopas, and with Salome). For further information concerning her see on John 20:1, 2, 11–18. Although the faith of these women was not what it should have been, their love for the Lord is certainly evident throughout. It would seem that of the entire circle of eleven men only one was at the cross. That one was the apostle John. But there were several women. All honor to them, to their courage, and to their love. In contrast to the boisterous soldiers, John portrays another group standing nearby. This groups consists of at least five individuals: Mary the mother of Jesus (who has not appeared as a character in the narrative since chapter 2), Mary’s unnamed sister (Jesus’ aunt), Mary the wife of Clopas, Mary Magdalene, and the beloved disciple (probably John himself). Mary Magdalene appears for the first time in John as if the readers already know who she is, and she will play a crucial role in the resurrection narrative of the next chapter. In a terribly poignant and touching scene, Jesus performs the final duties of the oldest son while hanging from the cross. He entrusts the beloved disciple (John) with the care of his mother. This man was suffering the excruciating result of his obedient submission to God, and “bearing the sins of the world” within his soul. Yet he does not cease to be a son who loves and cares for his mother to the best of his ability. This may have been intended as a temporary measure, until John could deliver Mary to Jesus’ younger brothers, but tradition has seen this as the beginning of a long-standing relationship between John and Mary. John says it this way, from that time on, this disciple took her into his house. On the other hand, we should consider the faith of those holy women. It is true that in following Christ to the cross they showed no common affection; but if they had not been supported by faith, they could never have been present on this stage. As for John himself, we infer that although his faith was smothered for a short while, it was not completely extinguished. It is shameful if fear of the cross deters us from following Christ, even when the glory of his resurrection is set before our eyes; the women saw nothing but the disgrace and cursing of the cross. Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary of Magda. He calls her either the wife or the “daughter” of Clopas. I prefer the latter interpretation. He says that she was his mother’s sister, according to the Hebrew idiom which includes cousins and other relatives in the word “brothers.” We see that it was not in vain that Mary of Magda had “seven demons” driven out of her (Mark 16:9), since she showed herself to the end to be such a faithful disciple of Christ. The four women, in contrast to the four soldiers, are the faithful; they stayed with Jesus until the end. Even more so, in contrast to the disciples who had fled after Jesus was arrested, these women followed Jesus to the cross and became eyewitnesses of his crucifixion. The first woman mentioned is Jesus’ mother (see 2:1ff.). Imagine her incredible grief, helplessly watching her son suffer and die unjustly. Indeed the prophet Simeon, who had spoken to her in the temple just after Jesus’ birth, had been correct when he had told her, “A sword will pierce your own soul too” (Luke 2:35, niv). Surely Mary was feeling that “sword” at that very moment. The other women mentioned here have not appeared earlier in John’s Gospel. Mary’s sister could have been Salome (see Matthew 27:55ff.; Mark 15:40ff.), the mother of John (the Gospel writer) and James. If this is true, Jesus, John, and James were cousins. Mary the wife of Clopas was the mother of James the younger and of Joses. Mary Magdalene is mentioned here for the first time in this Gospel. She will be a prominent figure in the next chapter—for Jesus appears first to her after his resurrection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John 19:38  Later, Joseph of Arimathea asked Pilate for the body of Jesus. Now Joseph was a disciple of Jesus, but secretly because he feared the Jews. With Pilate's permission, he came and took the body away. 39  He was accompanied by Nicodemus, the man who earlier had visited Jesus at night. Nicodemus brought a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about seventy-five pounds. 40 Taking Jesus' body, the two of them wrapped it, with the spices, in strips of linen. This was in accordance with Jewish burial customs. RV60  Después de todo esto,  José de Arimatea,  que era discípulo de Jesús,  pero secretamente por miedo de los judíos,  rogó a Pilato que le permitiese llevarse el cuerpo de Jesús;  y Pilato se lo concedió.  Entonces vino,  y se llevó el cuerpo de Jesús.  (39)  También Nicodemo,  el que antes había visitado a Jesús de noche,  vino trayendo un compuesto de mirra y de áloes,  como cien libras.  (40)  Tomaron,  pues,  el cuerpo de Jesús,  y lo envolvieron en lienzos con especias aromáticas,  según es costumbre sepultar entre los judíos.

 

John 20:1 Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance. (RV60)  El primer día de la semana,  María Magdalena fue de mañana,  siendo aún oscuro,  al sepulcro;  y vio quitada la piedra del sepulcro.

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JM 20:1–31 This chapter records the appearances of Jesus to His own followers: 1) the appearance to Mary Magdalene (vv. 1–18); 2) the appearance to the 10 disciples (vv. 19–23); and 3) the appearance to Thomas (vv. 24–29). Jesus did not appear to unbelievers (14:19; 16:16, 22) because the evidence of His resurrection would not have convinced them as the miracles had not (Luke 16:31). The god of this world had blinded them and prevented their belief (2 Cor. 4:4). Jesus, therefore, appears exclusively to His own in order to confirm their faith in the living Christ. Such appearances were so profound that they transformed the disciples from cowardly men hiding in fear to bold witnesses for Jesus (Peter; 18:27; Acts 2:14–39). Once again John’s purpose in recording these resurrection appearances was to demonstrate that Jesus’ physical and bodily resurrection was the crowning proof that He truly is the Messiah and Son of God who laid down His life for His own (10:17, 18; 15:13; Rom. 1:4). 20:1 first day of the week. A reference to Sunday. From then on, believers set aside Sunday to meet and remember the marvelous resurrection of the Lord (Acts 20:7; 1 Cor. 16:2). It became known as the Lord’s Day (Rev. 1:10). See Luke 24:4, 34. Mary Magdalene went to the tomb early, while it was still dark. Perhaps the reason why Jesus first appeared to Mary Magdalene was to demonstrate grace by His personal, loving faithfulness to someone who formerly had a sordid past; but clearly also because she loved Him so dearly and deeply, that she appeared before anyone else at the tomb. Her purpose in coming was to finish the preparation of Jesus’ body for burial by bringing more spices to anoint the corpse (Luke 24:1). 20:2 other disciple, whom Jesus loved. This is the author John. They have taken. Though Jesus had predicted His resurrection numerous times, it was more than she could believe at that point. It would take His showing Himself alive to them by many "infallible proofs" (Acts 1:3) for them to believe. 20:5–7 saw the linen cloths lying there. A contrast existed between the resurrection of Lazarus (11:44) and that of Jesus. While Lazarus came forth from the grave wearing his graveclothes, Jesus’ body, though physical and material, was glorified and was now able to pass through the graveclothes much in the same way that He later appeared in the locked room (vv. 19, 20; Phil. 3:21). linen cloths...handkerchief. The state of those items indicates no struggle, no hurried unwrapping of the body by grave robbers, who wouldn’t unwrap the body anyway, since transporting it elsewhere would be easier and more pleasant if it was left in its wrapped and spiced condition. All appearances indicated that no one had taken the body, but that it had moved through the cloth and left it behind in the tomb. 20:8 the other disciple. John saw the graveclothes and was convinced by them that He had risen. 20:9 did not know the Scripture. Neither Peter nor John understood that Scripture said Jesus would rise (Ps. 16:10). This is evident by the reports of Luke (24:25–27, 32, 44–47). Jesus had foretold His resurrection (2:17; Matt. 16:21; Mark 8:31; 9:31; Luke 9:22), but they would not accept it (Matt. 16:22; Luke 9:44, 45). By the time John wrote this gospel, the church had developed an understanding of the OT prediction of Messiah’s resurrection (cf. "as yet"). 20:11–13 weeping. Mary’s sense of grief and loss may have driven her back to the tomb. She apparently had not crossed paths with Peter or John and thus did not know of Jesus’ resurrection (see v. 9). 20:12 two angels. Luke (24:4) describes both. Matthew (28:2, 3) and Mark (16:5) report only one. John’s reason for the mention of angels is to demonstrate that no grave robbers took the body. This was an operation of the power of God. 20:14 did not know that it was Jesus. The reason for Mary’s failure to recognize Jesus is uncertain. She may not have recognized Him because her tears blurred her eyes (v. 11). Possibly also, the vivid memories of Jesus’ bruised and broken body were still etched in her mind, and Jesus’ resurrection appearance was so dramatically different that she failed to recognize Him. Perhaps, however, like the disciples on the road to Emmaus, she was supernaturally prevented from recognizing Him until He chose for her to do so (see Luke 24:16). 20:16 "Mary!" Whatever the reason for her failure to recognize Jesus, the moment He spoke the single word, "Mary," she immediately recognized Him. This is reminiscent of Jesus’ words "My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me" (10:27; cf. 10:3, 4). 20:17 Do not cling to Me, for I have not yet ascended. Mary was expressing a desire to hold on to His physical presence for fear that she would once again lose Him. Jesus’ reference to His ascension signifies that He would only be temporarily with them and though she desperately wanted Him to stay, He could not. Jesus was with them only for 40 more days and then He ascended (Acts 1:3–11). After He went to the Father, He sent the Holy Spirit ("The Helper") so that they would not feel abandoned (14:18, 19). My brethren. Disciples have been called "servants" or "friends" (15:15), but not "brothers," until here. Because of Jesus’ work on the cross in place of the sinner, this new relationship to Christ was made possible (Rom. 8:14–17; Gal. 3:26, 27; Eph. 1:5; Heb. 2:10–13)

 

John’s Gospel comes to a conclusion with a proclamation of Jesus’ victory over death (chap. 20) followed by an epilogue (chap. 21). Each Gospel writer stressed certain aspects of the events. John began with a testimony of how he came to personal faith in the Resurrection by considering the evidence found in the open tomb. 20:1-2. The first day of the week, Sunday, Mary of Magdala and other women (cf. we in v. 2) came to the tomb. “Mary of Magdala” is a translation of the same Greek words which elsewhere are rendered “Mary Magdalene” (Matt. 28:1; Mark 16:1, 9; Luke 24:10). Her devotion to Jesus, living and dead, was based on her gratitude for His delivering her from bondage to Satan. She had been an observer at the cross and now was the first person at the grave. This tomb had been closed with a large rock door (Mark 16:3-4) and had been sealed by the authority of the Roman governor Pontius Pilate (Matt. 27:65-66). The women were amazed to see an open and apparently empty tomb. They ran and told Peter and the beloved disciple (cf. John 19:26) that a terrible thing had occurred. They assumed that grave robbers had desecrated the tomb. 20:3-9. Peter and John started a footrace to the tomb. John beat Peter to the garden and looked in the tomb. It was not quite empty for John saw the grave clothes. Perhaps his first thought was that the women had made a mistake! He bent over and looked (blepei) in but did not enter the tomb, probably for fear of defilement. When Peter . . . arrived he rushed in and saw (theōrei, “beheld attentively”) the grave clothes and the separate burial cloth. He must have remained inside puzzled at what he saw. After a period of time John went in and saw (eiden, “perceived”—the third Gr. word for “see” in these verses) the significance of the grave clothes and believed. Peter must have been thinking, “Why would a grave robber have left the clothes in this order? Why take the body of Jesus?” But John perceived that the missing body and the position of the grave clothes was not due to a robbery. He realized that Jesus had risen from the dead and had gone through the grave clothes. The tomb was open not to let Jesus’ body out but to let the disciples and the world see that He rose. This section of John’s Gospel (20:1-9) is a powerful eyewitness testimony which strikes the perceptive reader as being psychologically and historically true. John commented (v. 9) that even after a long period of teaching by Jesus the disciples still did not understand from Scripture that Jesus had to rise from the dead (cf. Pss. 16:10-11; 110:1, 4; Isa. 53:11-12). Jesus’ appearance to Mary (20:10-18).20:10-14. Jesus’ first resurrection appearance was to Mary of Magdala, out of whom He had cast seven demons (Luke 8:2). (For a list of His resurrection appearances see Matt. 28.) The disciples returned to their homes while Mary remained outside the tomb crying. John must not have yet told her that Jesus was risen. He probably was too stunned and puzzled to say anything significant. Mary looked into the tomb and saw two individuals who were angels. In the Bible when angels appeared to people, the angels looked like men; they did not have halos or wings. In certain visions, winged beings appeared (Isa. 6) but the norm for angels was that they were in humanlike forms. Because of her grief Mary did not notice anything unusual. Their question and her answer set the stage for the greatest “recognition scene” in all of history (perhaps the second greatest is “I am Joseph”; Gen. 45:1-3). The appearance of Jesus to Mary was so unexpected that she did not realize that it was Jesus. The fact that He appeared to Mary rather than to Pilate or Caiaphas or to one of His disciples is significant. That a woman would be the first to see Him is an evidence of Jesus’ electing love as well as a mark of the narrative’s historicity. No Jewish author in the ancient world would have invented a story with a woman as the first witness to this most important event. Furthermore, Jesus may have introduced Himself to Mary first because she had so earnestly sought Him. She was at the cross while He was dying (John 19:25), and she went to His tomb early on Sunday morning (20:1).20:15-16. Mary talked with Jesus but still did not realize who He was. Some suggest that Jesus’ appearance was changed; others say she had a temporary “blindness” as did the Emmaus Road disciples who “were kept from recognizing Him” (Luke 24:16) until His act of disclosure. Others say that possibly the tears in her eyes kept her from recognizing Him.

Jesus said to her, Mary. As the Good Shepherd, He calls His sheep by name (cf. John 10:3) and “they know His voice” (10:4). Immediately she recognized Him! She responded with the cry Rabboni! (which means my Teacher) 20:17-18. She may have embraced Him physically, for the Lord responded, Do not hold on to Me, for I have not yet returned to the Father. Go instead to My brothers and tell them. . . . These words spoke of a new relationship, new relatives, and a new responsibility. Many wanted to “hold onto” Jesus. The KJV translation “Touch Me not,” has caused many interpreters to wonder why He could not be “touched.” The NIV translation is more accurate, for He certainly was not untouchable (Matt. 28:9; John 20:27). Mary had lost Jesus once before (at His crucifixion) and it was natural to fear the loss of His presence again. Jesus said, in effect, “This (the physical contact) is not My real presence for the church. A new relationship will begin with My Ascension and the gift of the Holy Spirit to the church.” Jesus then explained the fact of the new relatives. He called His disciples His brothers. Earlier He had said they were friends: “I no longer call you servants . . . instead, I have called you friends” (15:15). Believers in Jesus become a part of Jesus’ family with God as their Father (cf. Heb. 2:11-12; Rom. 8:15-17, 29; Gal. 3:26). Mary’s new responsibility was to testify to His risen presence. She was the recipient of four special graces: to see angels; to see Jesus risen; to be the first to see Him alive; and to be a proclaimer of the good news. Christians today are also the recipients of special grace; they too are given this new responsibility to witness to the world (Matt. 28:16-20). Jesus’ words, I am returning to My Father indicate His unique sonship. Mary and the other women told the news to the disciples, but according to Luke, they did not believe her or the other women “because their words seemed to them like nonsense” (Luke 24:11; Luke 24:23)

John 20:1–18 But the glorious truth of the Resurrection was not understood immediately by even His closest followers. It gradually dawned on these grieving people that their Master was not dead, but alive! And what a difference it made when the full realization of His resurrection took hold of them! For Mary Magdalene it meant moving from tears to joy (John 20:1–18); for the ten disciples it meant going from fear to courage (John 20:19–23); and for Thomas it meant moving from doubt to assurance (John 20:24–31). With Mary, the emphasis is on love; with the ten, the emphasis is on hope; and with Thomas, the emphasis is on faith. As we consider Mary Magdalene’s experience that Lord’s Day morning, we can see three stages in her comprehension of the truth of the Resurrection. Peter and John are also a part of this experience. Faith Eclipsed (John 20:1–2) Mary Magdalene and several other women agreed to go to the tomb early on the first day of the week, so that they might show their love for Christ in completing the burial preparations. Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus had been forced by circumstances to prepare His body hastily, and the women wanted to finish the task. Their great concern was how to get into the tomb. Perhaps the Roman soldiers would take pity on them and give them a hand. What they did not know was that an earthquake had occurred and the stone had been rolled back by an angel! It seems that Mary Magdalene went ahead of the other women and got to the tomb first. When she saw the stone rolled away from the door of the tomb, she concluded that somebody had broken into the tomb and stolen the body of her Lord. We may criticize Mary for jumping to conclusions; but when you consider the circumstances, it is difficult to see how she would have reached any other conclusion. It was still dark, she was alone, and, like the other followers of Jesus, she did not believe that He would return from the dead. She ran to give the news to Peter and John, who must have been living together at a place known to the other believers. Perhaps it was the Upper Room where they had met with Jesus. Mary’s use of the pronoun “we” is interesting, for it included the other women who at that moment were discovering that Jesus was alive! (see Mark 16:1–8 and Luke 24:1–8) The women left the tomb and carried the angels’ message to the other disciples. It is significant that the first witnesses of the resurrection of Christ were believing women. Among the Jews in that day, the testimony of women was not held in high regard. “It is better that the words of the Law be burned,” said the rabbis, “than be delivered to a woman.” But these Christian women had a greater message than that of the Law, for they knew that their Saviour was alive. Mary’s faith was not extinguished; it was only eclipsed. The light was still there, but it was covered. Peter and John were in the same spiritual condition, but soon all three of them would move out of the shadows and into the light. Faith Dawning (John 20:3–10) John 20:3 suggests that Peter started off first to run to the tomb, but John 20:4 reports that John got there first. Perhaps John was a younger man in better physical condition, or perhaps John was just a better runner. It is tempting to “spiritualize” this footrace and relate it to Isaiah 40:31 and Hebrews 12:1–2. When a believer is out of fellowship with the Lord, it is difficult to run the race of faith. However, both men deserve credit for having the courage to run into enemy territory, not knowing what lay before them. The whole thing could have been a clever trap to catch the disciples. When John arrived at the tomb, he cautiously remained outside and looked in. Perhaps he wanted Peter to be with him when he went into the burial chamber. What did John see? The graveclothes lying on the stone shelf without any evidence of violence or crime. But the graveclothes were empty! They lay there like an empty cocoon, still retaining the shape of Jesus’ body.Peter arrived and impulsively went into the tomb, just as we would expect him to do. He also saw the linen clothes lying there empty and the cloth for the head carefully rolled and lying by itself. Grave robbers do not carefully unwrap the corpse and then leave the graveclothes neatly behind. In fact, with the presence of the spices in the folds of the clothes, it would be almost impossible to unwrap a corpse without damaging the wrappings. The only way those linen clothes could be left in that condition would be if Jesus passed through them as He arose from the dead. John then entered the tomb and looked at the evidence. “He saw, and believed.” When John wrote this account, he used three different Greek words for seeing. In John 20:5, the verb simply means “to glance in, to look in.” In John 20:6, the word means “to look carefully, to observe.” The word “saw” in John 20:8 means “to perceive with intelligent comprehension.” Their Resurrection faith was now dawning! It seems incredible that the followers of Jesus did not expect Him to come out of the tomb alive. After all, He had told them many times that He would be raised from the dead. Early in His ministry He had said, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up” (John 2:19). After His resurrection, the disciples remembered that He had said this (John 2:22); however, His enemies remembered it too (Matt. 27:40, 63–64). He compared Himself to Jonah (Matt. 12:40), and on two occasions clearly announced His resurrection after three days (Matt. 16:21; 20:19). On Thursday of His last week of ministry He again promised to be raised up and meet them in Galilee (Matt. 26:32, and see Luke 24:6–7). What kind of faith did Peter and John have at that stage in their spiritual experience? They had faith based on evidence. They could see the graveclothes; they knew that the body of Jesus was not there. However, as good as evidence is to convince the mind, it can never change the life. Those of us who live centuries later cannot examine the evidence, for the material evidence (the tomb, the graveclothes) is no longer there for us to inspect. But we have the record in the Word of God (John 20:9) and that record is true (John 19:35; 21:24). In fact, it is faith in the Word that the Lord really wanted to cultivate in His disciples (see John 2:22; 12:16; 14:26). Peter made it clear that the Word of God, not personal experiences, should be the basis for our faith (1 Peter 1:12–21). The disciples had only the Old Testament Scriptures, so that is what is referred to in John 20:9. The early church used the Old Testament to prove to both Jews and Gentiles that Jesus is the Christ, that He died for sinners, and that He arose again (Acts 9:22; 13:16ff; 17:1–4; etc.). The Gospel includes “and that He arose again the third day according to the Scriptures” (1 Cor. 15:4). What Scriptures did Paul and John have in mind? Paul saw the Resurrection in Psalm 2:7 (Acts 13:33). Peter saw it in Psalm 16:8–11 (Acts 2:23–36 and note 13:35). Peter also referred to Psalm 110:1 (Acts 2:34–35). The statement “He shall prolong His days” in Isaiah 53:10 is also interpreted as a prediction of Christ’s resurrection. Jesus Himself used the Prophet Jonah to illustrate His own death, burial, and resurrection (Matt. 12:38–40); and this would include the “three days” part of the message. Paul saw in the Feast of Firstfruits a picture of the Resurrection (Lev. 23:9–14; 1 Cor. 15:20–23), and again, this would include “the third day.” Some students see the Resurrection and “the third day” in Hosea 6:2. After His resurrection, our Lord did not reveal Himself to everyone, but only to selected witnesses who would share the good news with others (Acts 10:39–43). This witness is now found in Scripture, the New Testament; and both the Old Testament and the New Testament agree in their witness. The Law, the Psalms, the Prophets, and the Apostles together bear witness that Jesus Christ is alive! Peter and John saw the evidence and believed. Later, the Holy Spirit confirmed their faith through the Old Testament Scriptures. That evening, they would meet the Master personally! Faith that was eclipsed has now started to dawn, and the light will get brighter.

Faith Shining (John 20:11–18) When I think of Mary Magdalene lingering alone in the garden, I recall Proverbs 8:17—“I love them that love Me; and those that seek Me early shall find Me.” Mary loved her Lord and came early to the garden to express that love. Peter and John had gone home by the time Mary got back to the tomb, so they did not convey to her what conclusion they had reached from the evidence they had examined. Mary still thought that Jesus was dead. Another verse comes to mind—Psalm 30:5, “Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.” Mary’s weeping was the loud lamentation so characteristic of Jewish people when they express their sorrow (John 11:31, 33). There is certainly nothing wrong with sincere sorrow, because God made us to shed tears; and weeping is good therapy for broken hearts. The sorrow of the Christian, however, must be different from the hopeless sorrow of the world (1 Thes. 4:13–18), because we have been born again “unto a living hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead” (1 Peter 1:3, nasb). We weep—not because our believing loved ones have gone to heaven—but because they have left us and we miss them. When Mary looked into the sepulcher, she saw two men in white. Their position at either end of the shelf where the body had been lying makes us think of the cherubim on the mercy seat (Ex. 25:17–19). It is as though God is saying, “There is now a new mercy seat! My Son has paid the price for sin, and the way is open into the presence of God!” Mary apparently was not disturbed at seeing these men, and there is no evidence that she knew they were angels. The brief conversation neither dried her tears nor quieted her mind. She was determined to find the body of Jesus. Why did Mary turn back and not continue her conversation with the two strangers? Did she hear a sound behind her? Or did the angels stand and recognize the presence of their Lord? Perhaps both of these speculations are true or neither is true. She was certain that the Lord’s body was not in the tomb, so why linger there any longer? Why did she not recognize the One for whom she was so earnestly searching? Jesus may have deliberately concealed Himself from her, as He would later do when He walked with the Emmaus disciples (Luke 24:13–32). It was still early and perhaps dark in that part of the garden. Her eyes were probably blinded by her tears as well. Jesus asked her the same question that the angels had asked, “Why are you weeping?” How tragic that she was weeping when she could have been praising, had she realized that her Lord was alive! Then He added, “Whom are you seeking?” (He had asked the mob the same question in the Garden—John 18:4.) It is encouraging to us to know that “Jesus knows all about our sorrows.” The Saviour knew that Mary’s heart was broken and that her mind was confused. He did not rebuke her; tenderly, He revealed Himself to her. All He had to do was to speak her name, and Mary immediately recognized Him. His sheep hear [recognize] His voice and He calls them by name (John 10:3). Apparently Mary had turned away from Jesus, for when He spoke her name, she had to turn back to look at Him again. What a blessed surprise it was to see the face of her beloved Master! All she could say was, “Rabboni—my Master, my Teacher.” The title Rabboni is used in only one other place in the Gospels, Mark 10:51 And answering him, Jesus said, "What do you want Me to do for you?" And the blind man said to Him, "Rabboni, [I want] to regain my sight!"] (in the Greek text “Lord” is “Rabboni”). “Rabbi” and “Rabboni” were equivalent terms of respect. In later years, the Jews recognized three levels of teachers: rab (the lowest), rabbi, and rabboni (the highest). Mary not only spoke to Him, but she grasped His feet and held on to Him. This was a natural gesture: now that she had found Him, she did not want to lose Him. She and the other believers still had a great deal to learn about His new state of glory; they still wanted to relate to Him as they had done during the years of His ministry before the cross. Jesus permitted the other women to hold His feet (Matt. 28:9), and He did not forbid them. Why did He say to Mary, “Do not cling to Me”? 28:1 After the Sabbath, at dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to look at the tomb.  2  There was a violent earthquake, for an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and, going to the tomb, rolled back the stone and sat on it.  3  His appearance was like lightning, and his clothes were white as snow.  4  The guards were so afraid of him that they shook and became like dead men.  5  The angel said to the women, "Do not be afraid, for I know that you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified.  6  He is not here; he has risen, just as he said. Come and see the place where he lay.  7  Then go quickly and tell his disciples: `He has risen from the dead and is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him.' Now I have told you."  8  So the women hurried away from the tomb, afraid yet filled with joy, and ran to tell his disciples.  9  Suddenly Jesus met them. "Greetings," he said. They came to him, clasped his feet and worshiped him.  10  Then Jesus said to them, "Do not be afraid. Go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me."

One reason was that she would see Him again because He had not yet ascended to the Father. He remained on earth for forty days after His resurrection and often appeared to the believers to teach them spiritual truth (Acts 1:1–9). Mary had no need to panic; this was not her last and final meeting with the Lord.  A second reason is that she had a job to do—to go tell His brethren that He was alive and would ascend to the Father. “He is not ashamed to call them brethren” (Heb. 2:11). “I will declare Thy name unto My brethren” (Ps. 22:22). He had called His own servants (John 13:16) and friends (John 15:15), but now He called them brethren. This meant that they shared His resurrection power and glory. Some students feel that Jesus did return to the Father on that morning, and that was the ascension He was referring to; but no other New Testament passage corroborates this interpretation. To say that He was fulfilling the symbolism of the Day of Atonement and presenting the blood to the Father is, I think, stretching a type too far (Lev. 16). For that matter, He had no blood to present; He had presented that on the cross when He was made sin for us. In His resurrection glory, Jesus was “flesh and bones” (Luke 24:39), not “flesh and blood.” The Resurrection itself was proof that the work of redemption had been completed (“raised because of our justification”—Rom. 4:24–25). What more could He do?

Our Lord never used the phrases “our Father” or “our God.” His relationship to the Father was different from that of the disciples, and He was careful to make that distinction. We say “our Father” and “our God” because all believers belong to the same family and have an equal standing before God. He reminded Mary and the other believers that God was their Father and that He would be with the Father in heaven after His ascension. In His Upper Room message, He had taught them that He would return to the Father so that the Spirit might come to them.

Though it was the same Jesus, only in a glorified body, it was not quite the same relationship. We must be careful not to relate to Christ “after the flesh” (1 Cor. 5:5–6), that is, relate to Him as though He were still in His state of humiliation. He is today the exalted Son of God in glory, and we must honor Him as such. The juvenile familiarity that some people display in public when they testify, pray, or sing only reveals that they have little understanding of Paul’s words in 2 Corinthians 5:16. - So from now on we regard no one from a worldly point of view. Though we once regarded Christ in this way, we do so no longer] When John was with Jesus at the table, he leaned against His bosom (John 13:23); but when John saw Jesus on the Isle of Patmos, he fell at His feet as dead! (Rev. 1:17) It would have been selfish and disobedient for Mary to have clung to Jesus and kept Him to herself. She arose and went to where the disciples were gathered and gave them the good news that she had seen Jesus alive. “I have seen the Lord!” (Note John 20:14, 18, 20, 25, 29.) Mark reports that these believers were mourning and weeping—and that they would not believe her! (Mark 16:9–11) Mary herself had been weeping, and Jesus had turned her sorrow into joy. If they had believed, their sorrow would also have turned to joy. Unbelief has a terribly deadening effect on a person. No wonder God warns us against “an evil heart of unbelief ” (Heb. 3:12). Mary not only shared the fact of His resurrection and that she had seen Him personally, but she also reported the words that He had spoken to her. Again, we see the importance of the Word of God. Mary could not transfer her experience over to them, but she could share the Word; and it is the Word that generates faith (Rom. 10:17). The living Christ shared His living Word (1 Peter 1:23–25). It is good to have faith that is based on solid evidence, but the evidence should lead us to the Word, and the Word should lead us to the Saviour. It is one thing to accept a doctrine and defend it; it is something else to have a personal relationship to the living Lord. Peter and John believed that Jesus was alive, but it was not until that evening that they met the risen Christ in person along with the other disciples. (Jesus appeared to Peter sometime during the afternoon, Luke 24:34; 1 Cor. 15:5.) Evidence that does not lead to experience is nothing but dead dogma. The key is faith in the Word of God. Dr. Robert W. Dale, one of Great Britain’s leading Congregational pastors and theologians, was one day preparing an Easter sermon when a realization of the risen Lord struck him with new power. “Christ is alive!” he said to himself. “Alive—alive—alive!” He paused, and then said, “Can that really be true? Living as really as I myself am?” He got up from his desk and began to walk about the study, repeating, “Christ is living! Christ is living!” Dr. Dale had known and believed this doctrine for years, but the reality of it overwhelmed him that day. From that time on, “the living Christ” was the theme of his preaching, and he had his congregation sing an Easter hymn every Sunday morning. “I want my people to get hold of the glorious fact that Christ is alive, and to rejoice over it; and Sunday, you know, is the day on which Christ left the dead.” Historical faith says, “Christ lives!” Saving faith says, “Christ lives in me!” Do you have saving faith?

JESUS RISES FROM THE DEAD / 20:1–10 The truth of Christianity rests heavily on the Resurrection. If Jesus rose from the grave, who saw him? How trustworthy were the witnesses? Those who claimed to have seen the risen Jesus went on to turn the world upside down. Most of them also died for being followers of Christ. People rarely die for halfhearted belief. Chapter 20 of John’s Gospel contains the record of Jesus’ resurrection and first appearances to his followers and John’s personal discovery of the empty tomb. The four Gospels provide different accounts of Jesus’ resurrection appearances. These appearances occurred over a forty-day period (Acts 1:3). See the chart below. Matthew’s Gospel records that after Jesus was buried by Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus, the chief priests and Pharisees again went to Pilate. This time they requested that the tomb be made secure. The religious leaders remembered Jesus’ claims to rise again on the third day, so they wanted to make sure that no one could get into the tomb (or maybe that no one could get out). Because the tomb was hewn out of rock in the side of a hill, there was only one entrance. The tomb was sealed by stringing a cord across the stone that was rolled over the entrance. The cord had a clay seal at each end. The religious leaders took a further precaution, asking that guards be placed at the tomb’s entrance. Their explanation to Pilate: “His disciples may go and steal him away, and tell the people, ‘He has been raised from the dead,’ and the last deception would be worse than the first” (Matthew 27:64 nrsv). The religious leaders didn’t know that at that moment the disciples were cowering in fear for their lives, not even thinking about the Resurrection. And such a sham would be unbelievable, for any thinking person would ask: “If Jesus rose again, where is he?” But the Pharisees were terrified of Jesus; and Pilate was still quaking in his Roman sandals from all that had occurred, so he agreed: “You have a guard of soldiers; go, make it as secure as you can” (Matthew 27:65). But they did not understand that no rock, seal, or guard could prevent the Son of God from rising again.

20:1–2 Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb. Mary Magdalene was one of several women who had followed Jesus to the cross, watched his crucifixion (19:25), and then remained to see where he was buried (Matthew 27:61). She, along with other women, was an early follower of Jesus who traveled with him and helped provide for the financial needs of the group: “The twelve were with [Jesus], as well as some women who had been cured of evil spirits and infirmities: Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out … and many others, who provided for them out of their resources” (Luke 8:1–3). Mary was obviously grateful to Jesus for freeing her from the torment of demon possession. She was from Magdala, a town near Capernaum in Galilee, and had followed Jesus to Jerusalem and, ultimately, to the foot of his cross and to his tomb. Because of the short interim between Jesus’ death and the coming of the Sabbath on Friday evening, the women who had stood by the cross had not had time to anoint Jesus. When the Sabbath arrived with the sunset on Friday, they had to go to their homes and rest. But after sundown on Saturday, the end of the Sabbath, they probably purchased and/or prepared the spices, then early on the first day of the week, (the day after the Sabbath, that is, Sunday), Mary Magdalene (also called Mary of Magdala in some versions) came to anoint the body of Jesus with certain spices. According to the other Gospel accounts, she was joined by Mary the mother of James, Salome (Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:1), and perhaps other women as well. Christ the Lord is ris’n today, Alleluia! Sons of men and angels say: Alleluia! Raise your joys and triumphs high, Alleluia! Sing, ye heav’ns and earth reply, Alleluia!”Charles Wesley

WHAT CAN YOU DO? These women had followed Joseph to the tomb, and so they knew exactly where to find Jesus’ body when they returned after the Sabbath with their spices and ointments. These women could not do great things for Jesus—they were not permitted to stand up before the Jewish council or the Roman governor and testify on his behalf—but they did what they could. They stayed at the cross when most of the disciples had fled, and they got ready to anoint their Lord’s body. Because of their devotion, they were the first to know about the Resurrection. As believers, we may feel we can’t do much for Jesus. But we are called to take advantage of the opportunities given us, doing what we can do and not worrying about what we cannot do. Mark records that as the women were on their way to the tomb, they were saying to one another, “Who will roll away the stone for us from the entrance to the tomb?” (Mark 16:3). But this would not be a problem, because as they approached they saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance. John writes specifically from Mary Magdalene’s perspective, as if she were the only one at the tomb. The other women were there, but in the following verses they are gone, for Mary Magdalene is the first person to see the resurrected Christ. At this point, however, the women arrived at the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed. They assumed that Jesus’ body had been stolen. But the stone had been rolled away, not by grave robbers, and not so that Jesus could get out, but so they, and others, could get in and see that Jesus was gone. ANGELS The conception, birth, and resurrection of Jesus Christ are supernatural events beyond human logic or reasoning. Because of this, God sent angels to help certain people understand the significance of what was happening (see Matthew 2:13, 19; Luke 1:11, 26; 2:9; 24:4–7). Angels are spiritual beings created by God who help carry out his work on earth. They bring God’s messages to people (Luke 1:26ff.; 24:4–7), protect God’s people (Daniel 6:22), offer encouragement (Genesis 16:7ff.), give guidance (Exodus 14:19), carry out punishment (2 Samuel 24:16), patrol the earth (Zechariah 1:9–14), and fight the forces of evil (2 Kings 6:16–18; Revelation 20:1–2). There are both good and bad angels (Revelation 12:7), but because bad angels are allied with the devil, or Satan, they have considerably less power and authority than good angels. Eventually the main role of angels will be to offer continuous praise to God (Revelation 7:11–12). The other Gospel accounts record that angels spoke to the women. According to Mark’s Gospel, as they went to the tomb, they wondered among themselves how they were going to get in. “When they looked up, they saw that the stone, which was very large, had already been rolled back. As they entered the tomb, they saw a young man, dressed in a white robe” (Mark 16:4–5). Luke records two angels who, in no uncertain terms, questioned the women with a slight reprimand: “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen. Remember how he told you, while he was still in Galilee, that the Son of Man must be handed over to sinners, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again” (Luke 24:5–7). Then the angels told the women to “go quickly and tell His disciples that He is risen from the dead” (Matthew 28:7). She ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, [that is, John the Gospel writer] and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” According to Luke’s account, several women ran to tell the disciples: “Now it was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the other women with them who told this to the apostles. But these words seemed to them an idle tale, and they did not believe them. But Peter got up and ran to the tomb; stooping and looking in, he saw the linen cloths by themselves; then he went home, amazed at what had happened” (Luke 24:10–12). Peter was not alone when he dashed in amazement to the tomb; John adds his personal account (as “the other disciple”) to his narrative. 20:3–5 Peter and the other disciple set out and went toward the tomb…. The other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Though John’s youthful legs carried him more swiftly to the grave, once he was there he looked in, but he waited for Peter’s arrival before entering the cave. Resurrection would not have been their first thought. None of the possible natural explanations for the missing body were of any comfort. If Jesus’ body had been stolen or moved by the religious leaders, the disciples would have reason to worry about their own fate.

20:6–7 Then Simon Peter, who was behind him, arrived and went into the tomb. He saw the strips of linen lying there…. The cloth was folded up by itself, separate from the linen. Close examination revealed that the graveclothes had been left as if Jesus had passed right through them. The headpiece was rolled up separately from the other wrappings that had enveloped Jesus’ body. A grave robber couldn’t possibly have made off with Jesus’ body and left the linens as if they were still shaped around it. The neatness and order indicated that there was not a hasty removal of Jesus’ body. Rather, Jesus arose and left the wrappings lying there, empty.

20:8–9 Finally the other disciple, who had reached the tomb first, also went inside. He saw and believed. When John saw the empy tomb and the empty graveclothes, he instantly believed that Jesus must have risen from the dead. The text stresses the importance here of John “seeing and believing” to affirm the eyewitness account of an apostle. Most believers would not have this opportunity; they would have to base their faith on what the witnesses reported. Though John believed that the graveclothes and open tomb indicated Jesus’ resurrection, he still did not understand from Scripture that Jesus had to rise from the dead (see 2:22). John believed, but without complete understanding; that would come later and affirm his belief. The Scripture they would come to understand probably included Psalm 16:10 (“You will not abandon me to the grave, nor will you let your Holy One see decay,” niv) and Isaiah 53:11 (“After the suffering of his soul, he will see the light of life and be satisfied”). The disciples did not fabricate this story about the Resurrection; in fact, they were surprised that Jesus was not in the tomb. When John saw the graveclothes looking like an empty cocoon from which Jesus had emerged, he believed that Jesus had risen. It wasn’t until after they had seen the empty tomb that they remembered what the Scriptures and Jesus had said—he would die, but he would also rise again! John’s account also demonstrates that the disciples couldn’t have “invented” the Resurrection in order to fulfill the Old Testament prophecies because they did not immediately see any Old Testament connection. The fact of the Resurrection opened the disciples minds to see that God had foretold his plan through the prophets. THE KEY Why is Jesus’ resurrection the key to the Christian faith?•     Jesus rose from the dead, just as he said. We can be confident, therefore, that Jesus will accomplish all he has promised.•     Jesus’ bodily resurrection shows us that the living Christ, not a false prophet or impostor, is ruler of God’s eternal kingdom.•     Because Jesus was resurrected, we can be certain of our own resurrection. Death is not the end—there is future life.•     The divine power that brought Jesus back to life is now available to us to bring our spiritually dead selves back to life. The Resurrection is the basis for the church’s witness to the world. 20:10 Then the disciples went back to their homes. Perplexed, John and Peter left and went back home. They “believed” in something miraculous; that is, they did not fear that Jesus’ body had been stolen, as Mary had, but they did not know for sure what they believed or what they should do next. So they just went home. Later they joined with the other disciples behind locked doors (20:19). JESUS APPEARS TO MARY MAGDALENE / 20:11–18 We see Jesus’ humility in his resurrection as well as in his crucifixion. Jesus did not rise and then march into the temple to confront the religious leaders or Caiaphas; he did not dash to the Praetorium to say to Pilate, “I told you so”; he did not go stand in the center of Jerusalem to impress the crowd. Instead, Jesus revealed himself only to believers. The first person to see him was a woman who had been healed and forgiven and who tearfully stayed at the cross and followed his body to the tomb. As Jesus demonstrated throughout his life, he responded to those who waited attentively and faithfully. Jesus dissolved the perplexities of the disciples. He dried their tears. He dispelled their doubts. Jesus knows how similar we are to his original disciples, and he does not overpower us either. Even though our faithfulness wavers, Jesus faithfully stays with us.

JESUS’ (11) APPEARANCES AFTER HIS RESURRECTION

1. Mary Magdalene Mark 16:9–11; John 20:10–18
2. The other women at the tomb Matthew 28:8–10
3. Peter in Jerusalem Luke 24:34; 1 Corinthians 15:5
4. The two travelers on the road Mark 16:12–13; Luke 24:13–35
5. Ten disciples behind closed doors Mark 16:14; Luke 24:36–43; John 20:19–25
6. All eleven disciples (including Thomas) John 20:26–31; 1 Corinthians 15:5
7. Seven disciples while fishing on the Sea of Galilee John 21:1–14
8. Eleven disciples on a mountain in Galilee Matthew 28:16–20; Mark 16:15–18
9. A crowd of 500 1 Corinthians 15:6
10. Jesus’ brother James 1 Corinthians 15:7
11. Those who watched Jesus ascend into heaven Mark 16:19–20; Luke 24:44–49; Acts 1:3–8

20:11–12 Mary stood outside the tomb crying. Mary apparently followed Peter and John back to the tomb. When the two disciples left, she was there alone, still crying, still hoping that somehow she could discover where Jesus’ body had been taken, but fearing the worst. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb and saw two angels in white. The angels actually looked like humans—not beings with halos and wings. The angels had appeared to the women and then sent them to spread the good news that Jesus was alive (Matthew 28:1–7; Mark 16:1–7; Luke 24:1–12), but apparently they (the angels) were not in the tomb when Peter and John arrived. Yet they are here again to speak to Mary. 20:13 They asked her, “Woman, why are you crying?” Under normal circumstances this would seem to be an odd question. People might be expected to be crying beside the tomb of a loved one, and even more so if one thought the tomb had been desecrated and the body stolen. However, the angels knew the incredible joy of the empty tomb. They also knew that if these people had listened to Jesus’ words about his resurrection while he was alive, they would not be sad and confused; instead, they would be leaping for joy. So the angels’ question was not odd, but obvious. It was not meant as a rebuke, but as a reminder of heaven’s perspective. Every tragedy provides us with an opportunity to see Jesus in a new way. As we experience sorrow, we can recall Christ’s suffering for us. Our pain is a result of living in a fallen world; his pain was the result of his love for us who inhabit this sinful world. Our pain is deserved, or at least unavoidable; his pain was freely chosen. Our pain reminds us that beyond it lies all the blessing that Christ provided for us by his pain. Because Jesus died, we can be forgiven. Because he lives, we too shall live! Christ’s resurrection gives us hope for a future restoration with loved ones and the gift of new bodies in the heavenly kingdom.Mary simply answered the angels’ question, “Because they have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid Him.” 20:14–15 At this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not realize that it was Jesus. Something caused Mary to turn around, probably a feeling that a person had come up behind her. And indeed, next to the tomb stood Jesus, but Mary didn’t recognize him. Perhaps this was the same kind of blindness that afflicted the two who walked with the risen Jesus on the road to Emmaus (see Luke 24:15–16 As they talked and discussed these things with each other, Jesus himself came up and walked along with them;  16  but they were kept from recognizing him. / Pero sus ojos estaban velados para que no le reconocieran.). Or perhaps Mary’s eyes were so full of tears and her grief so intense that she literally could not see who was standing there. “Woman,” he said, “why are you crying? Who is it you are looking for?” Jesus repeated the angels’ question and added an additional question, asking Mary to specify her request. Thinking he was the gardener, she said, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have put him, and I will get him.” Mary imagined that this man was the gardener. She was trying to grasp what might have happened to Jesus’ body. The shock of having the grave disturbed must have been devastating. 20:16–17 Jesus said to her, “Mary!” She turned and said to him in Hebrew, “Rabbouni!” (which means Teacher). Mary had been looking for the body of her dead Lord; suddenly, to her amazement, she stood face to face with her living Lord. Mary didn’t recognize Jesus at first. Her grief had blinded her, and she couldn’t see him because she didn’t expect to see him. Then Jesus spoke her name, and immediately she recognized him. A gardener would not have known her name. Imagine the love that flooded Mary’s heart when she heard her Savior saying her name! JESUS KNOWS YOUR NAME Your heart may be filled with grief and despair, but Jesus knows your name. Suffering does not mean that you have been forgotten! Jesus knows every tear and every trial you face. In sorrow, he seeks you out by his comforting Holy Spirit, to minister to you.

Mary’s immediate response was to touch Jesus and cling to him. But Jesus stopped her: “Do not hold on to me,” which could also be translated, “Stop clinging to me.” Perhaps Mary wanted to hold Jesus and not lose him again. She had not yet understood the Resurrection. Perhaps she thought this was his promised Second Coming (14:3). Though Mary’s title of “teacher” was endearing, Jesus did not want to be detained at the tomb. He was not to remain on this earth in physical form. If he did not ascend to heaven, the Holy Spirit could not come. Both he and Mary had important work to do. “But go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’” Prior to his death, Jesus had called the disciples his “friends” (15:15). But here, because of the Resurrection, Jesus’ disciples had become his brothers (see also Matthew 28:10). Christ’s resurrection creates this new level of relationship because it provides for the regeneration of every believer (see 1 Peter 1:3). After his resurrection, Jesus called his disciples “my brothers” (see Hebrews 2:11–14). After Jesus ascended to his Father, he would come to his disciples and give them this new life and relationship by breathing into them the Holy Spirit. Thus, for the first time in the Gospel, it is made clear that Jesus’ Father is our Father, that Jesus’ God is our God. The death and resurrection of Jesus ushered in a new relationship between believers and God.

20:18 Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: “I have seen the Lord!” Thus, Mary was the first person to see the risen Christ. THE TOMB IS EMPTY Mary did not meet the risen Christ until she had discovered the empty tomb. She responded with joy and obedience by going to tell the disciples. We cannot meet Christ until we discover that he is indeed alive, that his tomb is empty. Are you filled with joy by this good news? How can you share it with others? And she told them that he had said these things to her. Jesus’ words should have been a great comfort to the disciples. Despite their deserting him in the Garden, he was calling them his “brothers” and explaining that his Father was theirs, his God was theirs. But this report was no more believed by the disciples than the women’s report of the angels’ words (see Luke 24:10–11). “She went and told those who had been with him and who were mourning and weeping. When they heard that Jesus was alive and that she had seen him, they did not believe it” (Mark 16:10–11). The disciples were still hiding behind locked doors, for fear of the Jews. HE AROSE!  People who hear about the Resurrection for the first time may need time before they can comprehend this amazing story. Like Mary and the disciples, they may pass through FOUR STAGES OF BELIEF:

(1) At first, they may think the story is a fabrication, impossible to believe (20:2).

(2) Next, like Peter, they may check out the facts and still be puzzled about what happened (20:6).

(3) Only when they encounter Jesus personally will they be able to accept fact of the Resurrection (20:16)

(4) Then, as they commit themselves to the risen Lord and devote their lives to serving him, they begin to understand fully the reality of his presence with them (20:28).

At this point, Matthew records the humorous anecdote about the religious leaders and the guards, who had obviously been unable to stop this “deception” that they had so much feared (Matthew 27:62–66). Matthew alone records that the guards were present at the tomb but “became like dead men” at the appearance of the angels (Matthew 28:4). So picture them high-tailing it to the chief priests—breathlessly telling the story of an angel descending, an earthquake, and the tomb opening—and then not being able to remember anything else! Notice that they did not go to Pilate, for to do so might have meant their lives. Roman soldiers who let a prisoner escape (even a dead one) would often pay for their negligence with their lives. The religious leaders dealt with the soldiers as they had with Judas—with money. They gave the frightened men a large sum of money and told them to forget whatever they saw: “You must say, ‘His disciples came by night and stole him away while we were asleep.’ If this comes to the governor’s ears, we will satisfy him and keep you out of trouble” (Matthew 28:13–14). These soldiers “took the money and did as they were directed. And this story is still told among the Jews to this day” (Matthew 28:15).

Meanwhile, a very alive Jesus was making himself known to his beloved followers: the women (Matthew 28:8–10), Peter (Luke 24:34), and two travelers on the road to Emmaus (Mark 16:12–13; Luke 24:13–35). Then he went to see his disciples.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jesus said to her, "Mary!" She turned and said to Him, "Rabboni!" (which is to say, Teacher). Jn 20:16

Mary Magdalene was one of the most devoted followers that Jesus ever had. Luke's Gospel tells us that she and others ministered to Him out of "their substance," which simply means that she financially supported Him. She traveled with Him. She wanted to be near Him. She wanted to hear Him. She had the courage to stand at the foot of the cross when most of the disciples were in hiding. Imagine how her heart broke at His crucifixion.
She was the last at the cross, and early Sunday morning, she was the first at the tomb. She was not there to see a risen Lord, but to anoint His dead body. But she was in for a great surprise, because Jesus came to her in the midst of her sorrow.
And Jesus comes in the same way to the grieving person today. Maybe you feel desperate in your own grief. Maybe it is over a death. Maybe it is the breakup of a marriage. Maybe you have a child who has gone astray spiritually. But you are grieving.
The good news is that things can change. Things may look absolutely bleak today, but that husband or wife may return. That prodigal child may come back to God. And as a believer, you will again see that Christian loved one who has died. No matter what your circumstances, Jesus will be there with you. Maybe He will resolve your problems immediately. Or maybe your problems will continue. But you never will be alone.
That is the message of the resurrected Lord to us. He knows what we are going through. He understands. And He cares.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  New Testament Women

 

Mary, the virgin mother of Jesus, has a place of honor among the women of the New Testament. As the first member of the human race to accept Christ, she stands as the first of the redeemed throughout Christian history. She is an enduring example of faith, humility, and service (Luke 1:26–56). Other notable women of the New Testament include the following: Jesus visits with Mary and Martha.
Name Description Biblical Reference
Anna Recognized Jesus as the long-awaited Messiah Luke 2:36-38
Bernice Sister of Agrippa before whom Paul made his defense Acts 25:13
Candace A queen of Ethiopia Acts 8:27
Chloe Woman who knew of divisions in the church at Corinth 1 Cor. 1:11
Claudia Christian of Rome 2 Tim. 4:21
Damaris Woman of Athens converted under Paul’s ministry Acts 17:34
Dorcas (Tabitha) Christian in Joppa who was raised from the dead by Peter Acts 9:36-41
Drusilla Wife of Felix, governor of Judea Acts 24:24
Elizabeth Mother of John the Baptist Luke 1:5, 13
Eunice Mother of Timothy 2 Tim. 1:5
Herodias Queen who demanded the execution of John the Baptist Matt. 14:3-10
Joanna Provided for the material needs of Jesus Luke 8:3
Lois Grandmother of Timothy 2 Tim. 1:5
Lydia Convert under Paul’s ministry in Philippi Acts 16:14
Martha and Mary Sisters of Lazarus; friends of Jesus Luke 10:38-42
Mary Magdalene Woman from whom Jesus cast out demons Matt. 27:56–61;Mark 16:9
Phoebe A servant, perhaps a deconess, in the church at Cenchrea Rom. 16:1, 2
Priscilla Wife of Aquila; laborer with Paul at Corinth and Ephesus Acts 18:2, 18, 19
Salome Mother of Jesus’ disciples James and John Matt. 20:20-24
Sapphira Held back goods from the early Christian community Acts 5:1
Susanna Provided for the material needs of Jesus Luke 8:3

 

 

 

Resurrection Appearances—Ryrie Study Notes

# Appeared to Location Time Scriptures
1 Mary Magdelene Jerusalem Sunday Mark 16:9-11; John 20:11-18
2 Some other women Jerusalem Sunday Matthew 28:9-10
3 Peter Jerusalem Sunday Luke 24:34; 1 Cor. 15:5
4 Emmaus disciples Emmaus Sunday Luke 24:13-35
S 10 disciples Jerusalem Sunday Mark 16:14; Luke 24:26-43; John 20:19-25
6 11 disciples Jerusalem A week later John 20:26-31; 1 Cor. 15:5
7 7 disciples Galilee ? John 21:1-25
8 500 at one time ? ? 1 Cor. 15:6
9 James (brother of Jesus) ? ? 1 Cor. 15:7
10 11 disciples Galilee ? Matthew 28:16-20; Mark 16:15-18
11 11 disciples Jerusalem 40 days later Luke 24:44-53; Acts 1:3-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE RESURRECTION THROUGH THE ASCENSION – (from the Open Bible)

Date Event Location Matthew Mark Luke John Related Ref
A.D. 30              
Dawn of First Day (Sunday, “Lord’s Day”) (1)     Women Visit the Tomb Near Jerusalem 28:1–10 16:1–8 24:1–11    
  (2)     Peter and John See the Empty Tomb       24:12 20:1–10  
  (3)     Jesus’ Appearance to Mary Magdalene Jerusalem   16:9–11   20:11–18  
  (4)     Jesus’ Appearance to the Other Women Jerusalem 28:9, 10        
  (5)     Guards’ Report of the Resurrection   28:11–15        
Sunday Afternoon (6)     Jesus’ Appearance to Two Disciples on Way to Emmaus     16:12, 13 24:13–35   1 Cor. 15:5
Late Sunday (7)     Jesus’ Appearance to Ten Disciples Without Thomas Jerusalem   16:14 24:36–43 20:19–25  
One Week Later (8)     Appearance to Disciples with Thomas Jerusalem       20:26–31  
During 40 Days until Ascension (9)     Jesus’ Appearance to Seven Disciples by Sea of Galilee Galilee       21:1–25  
  (10)     Appearance to 500 Mt. in Galilee         1 Cor. 15:6
  (11)     Great Commission   28:16–20 16:15–18 24:44–49    
  (12)     The Ascension Mt. Olivet   16:19, 20 24:50–53   Acts 1:4–11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WOMEN VISIT THE TOMB

Matt.28:1-10 After the Sabbath, at dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to look at the tomb. 2 There was a violent earthquake, for an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and, going to the tomb, rolled back the stone and sat on it. 3 His appearance was like lightning, and his clothes were white as snow. 4 The guards were so afraid of him that they shook and became like dead men. 5 The angel said to the women, "Do not be afraid, for I know that you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified. 6 He is not here; he has risen, just as he said. Come and see the place where he lay. 7 Then go quickly and tell his disciples: `He has risen from the dead and is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him.' Now I have told you." 8 So the women hurried away from the tomb, afraid yet filled with joy, and ran to tell his disciples. 9  Suddenly Jesus met them. "Greetings," he said. They came to him, clasped his feet and worshiped him. 10 Then Jesus said to them, "Do not be afraid. Go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me."

Mark 16:1-8  When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus' body. 2  Very early on the first day of the week, just after sunrise, they were on their way to the tomb 3  and they asked each other, "Who will roll the stone away from the entrance of the tomb?" 4 But when they looked up, they saw that the stone, which was very large, had been rolled away. 5  As they entered the tomb, they saw a young man dressed in a white robe sitting on the right side, and they were alarmed. 6 "Don't be alarmed," he said. "You are looking for Jesus the Nazarene, who was crucified. He has risen! He is not here. See the place where they laid him. 7 But go, tell his disciples and Peter, `He is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him, just as he told you.'" 8 Trembling and bewildered, the women went out and fled from the tomb. They said nothing to anyone, because they were afraid.

Luke 24:1-11 On the first day of the week, very early in the morning, the women took the spices they had prepared and went to the tomb. 2 They found the stone rolled away from the tomb, 3 but when they entered, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus. 4 While they were wondering about this, suddenly two men in clothes that gleamed like lightning stood beside them. 5 In their fright the women bowed down with their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, "Why do you look for the living among the dead? 6 He is not here; he has risen! Remember how he told you, while he was still with you in Galilee: 7 `The Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, be crucified and on the third day be raised again.'" 8 Then they remembered his words. 9 When they came back from the tomb, they told all these things to the Eleven and to all the others. 10 It was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the others with them who told this to the apostles. 11 But they did not believe the women, because their words seemed to them like nonsense.

 

Peter & John see empty tomb (Lk.24:12; Jn.20:1-10)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JESUS APPEARS TO MARY MAGDALENE

Mark 16:9-11 When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons.  10  She went and told those who had been with him and who were mourning and weeping.  11  When they heard that Jesus was alive and that she had seen him, they did not believe it.

John 20:11-18 but Mary stood outside the tomb crying. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb  12 and saw two angels in white, seated where Jesus' body had been, one at the head and the other at the foot. 13 They asked her, "Woman, why are you crying?"  "They have taken my Lord away," she said, "and I don't know where they have put him." 14 At this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not realize that it was Jesus. 15 "Woman," he said, "why are you crying? Who is it you are looking for?"  Thinking he was the gardener, she said, "Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have put him, and I will get him." 16 Jesus said to her, "Mary."  She turned toward him and cried out in Aramaic, "Rabboni!" (which means Teacher). 17 Jesus said, "Do not hold on to me, for I have not yet returned to the Father. Go instead to my brothers and tell them, `I am returning to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.'" 18 Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: "I have seen the Lord!" And she told them that he had said these things to her.

 

JESUS APPEARS TO OTHER WOMEN

Matt.28:9-10 Suddenly Jesus met them. "Greetings," he said. They came to him, clasped his feet and worshiped him. 10 Then Jesus said to them, "Do not be afraid. Go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me." 11 While the women were on their way, some of the guards went into the city and reported to the chief priests everything that had happened.

 

Paul – the greatest example of a convert

Manasseh – OT greatest example of a convet

Gadarene Demoniac – most dramatic example of a conversion

 

What are the 7 biggest changes God has made in you (that others can plainly see)?

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Sermon: Mary Magdalene the Faithful Servant

 

John 20:18  Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: "I have seen the Lord!" And she told them that he had said these things to her. (NBLH)  María Magdalena fue y anunció a los discípulos: "¡He visto al Señor!," y que El le había dicho estas cosas.

 

Mark 16:9-11  When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons. 10 She went and told those who had been with him and who were mourning and weeping. 11 When they heard that Jesus was alive and that she had seen him, they did not believe it. RV60  Habiendo,  pues,  resucitado Jesús por la mañana,  el primer día de la semana,  apareció primeramente a María Magdalena,  de quien había echado siete demonios.  (10)  Yendo ella,  lo hizo saber a los que habían estado con él,  que estaban tristes y llorando.  (11)  Ellos,  cuando oyeron que vivía,  y que había sido visto por ella,  no lo creyeron.

 

# Appeared to Location Time Scriptures
1 Mary Magdelene Jerusalem Sunday Mark 16:9-11; John 20:11-18
2 Some other women Jerusalem Sunday Matthew 28:9-10
3 Peter Jerusalem Sunday Luke 24:34; 1 Cor. 15:5
4 Emmaus disciples Emmaus Sunday Luke 24:13-35
S 10 disciples Jerusalem Sunday Mark 16:14; Luke 24:26-43; John 20:19-25
6 11 disciples Jerusalem A week later John 20:26-31; 1 Cor. 15:5
7 7 disciples Galilee ? John 21:1-25
8 500 at one time ? ? 1 Cor. 15:6
9 James (brother of Jesus ? ? 1 Cor. 15:7
10 11 disciples Galilee ? Matthew 28:16-20; Mark 16:15-18
11 11 disciples Jerusalem 40 days later Luke 24:44-53; Acts 1:3-12

 

TOP 7 CHANGES GOD HAS MADE IN MY LIFE SINCE I WAS BORN AGAIN………& FUTURE CHANGES

1. ________________________________________________________________            1. _____

2_________________________________________________________________            2______

3_________________________________________________________________            3______

4_________________________________________________________________            4______

5_________________________________________________________________            5______

6_________________________________________________________________            6______

7_________________________________________________________________            7______

 

Luke 8:1-3  After this, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The Twelve were with him, 2 and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out; 3 Joanna the wife of Cuza, the manager of Herod's household; Susanna; and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means. RV60  Aconteció después,  que Jesús iba por todas las ciudades y aldeas,  predicando y anunciando el evangelio del reino de Dios,  y los doce con él,  (2)  y algunas mujeres que habían sido sanadas de espíritus malos y de enfermedades:  María,  que se llamaba Magdalena,  de la que habían salido siete demonios,  (3)  Juana,  mujer de Chuza intendente de Herodes,  y Susana,  y otras muchas que le servían de sus bienes. [NBLH  que de sus bienes personales contribuían al sostenimiento de ellos].

Luke 8:1-3  After this, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The Twelve were with him, 2 and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out; 3 Joanna the wife of Cuza, the manager of Herod's household; Susanna; and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means. RV60  Aconteció después,  que Jesús iba por todas las ciudades y aldeas,  predicando y anunciando el evangelio del reino de Dios,  y los doce con él,  (2)  y algunas mujeres que habían sido sanadas de espíritus malos y de enfermedades:  María,  que se llamaba Magdalena,  de la que habían salido siete demonios,  (3)  Juana,  mujer de Chuza intendente de Herodes,  y Susana,  y otras muchas que le servían de sus bienes. [NBLH  que de sus bienes personales contribuían al sostenimiento de ellos].

APP: a woman’s role in the ministry

Luke recorded five events involving women that are not mentioned in the other Gospels. In first-century Jewish culture, women were usually treated as second-class citizens, enjoying few of the rights that men had. But Jesus crossed those barriers, and Luke showed the special care of Jesus for women.

The following passages tell of his encounters with women.

Jesus talks to a Samaritan woman at the well John 4:1–26
Jesus heals Peter’s mother-in-law John 4:1–26
Jesus raises a widow’s son from the dead Luke 7:11–17
A sinful woman anoints Jesus’ feet Luke 7:36–50
The adulterous woman whom Jesus forgave John 8:1–11
Women travel with Jesus Luke 8:1–3
Jesus heals a diseased woman Luke 8:43–48
Jesus visits Mary and Martha Luke 10:38–42
Jesus heals a crippled woman Luke 13:10–17
Jesus heals the daughter of a Gentile woman Mark 7:24–30
Weeping women follow Jesus on his way to the cross Luke 23:27–31
Jesus’ mother and other women gather at the cross John 19:25–27
Jesus appears to Mary Magdalene Mark 16:9–11
Jesus appears to other women after his resurrection Matthew 28:8–10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt 27:55-56 Many women were there, watching from a distance. They had followed Jesus from Galilee to care for his needs. 56 Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joses, and the mother of Zebedee's sons. RV60  Estaban allí muchas mujeres mirando de lejos,  las cuales habían seguido a Jesús desde Galilea,  sirviéndole,  (56)  entre las cuales estaban María Magdalena,  María la madre de Jacobo y de José,  y la madre de los hijos de Zebedeo.

** Because she is always first in any list of women indicates that she probably had a special leadership role.

** Note that, in the Gospels, no women ever reject Christ or become his enemies, only men.

 

Matt.27:59-61 59  Joseph took the body, wrapped it in a clean linen cloth,  60  and placed it in his own new tomb that he had cut out of the rock. He rolled a big stone in front of the entrance to the tomb and went away. 61 Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were sitting there opposite the tomb. RV60  Y tomando José el cuerpo,  lo envolvió en una sábana limpia,  (60)  y lo puso en su sepulcro nuevo,  que había labrado en la peña;  y después de hacer rodar una gran piedra a la entrada del sepulcro,  se fue.  (61)  Y estaban allí María Magdalena,  y la otra María,  sentadas delante del sepulcro.

** It’s significant that the women are present at the crucifixion, the burial & are first at the tomb

 

Matt.28:1 After the Sabbath, at dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to look at the tomb. 2 There was a violent earthquake, for an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and, going to the tomb, rolled back the stone and sat on it. RV60  Pasado el día de reposo,  al amanecer del primer día de la semana,  vinieron María Magdalena y la otra María,  a ver el sepulcro.  (2)  Y hubo un gran terremoto;  porque un ángel del Señor,  descendiendo del cielo y llegando,  removió la piedra,  y se sentó sobre ella.

**  they left when it was still dark and got there at dawn…..APP:  punctuality for worship

* Proverbs 8:17—“I love them that love Me; and those that seek Me early shall find Me.” (RV60)  Yo amo a los que me aman,  Y me hallan los que temprano me buscan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark 15:40 Some women were watching from a distance. Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James the younger and of Joses, and Salome. (RV60)  También había algunas mujeres mirando de lejos, entre las cuales estaban María Magdalena,  María la madre de Jacobo el menor y de José, y Salomé,

            ….compare with vv that show her “near the cross”

 

Mark 15:47 Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses saw where he was laid. (NBLH)  Y María Magdalena y María, la madre de José, miraban para saber dónde lo ponían.

            She knew where to go after the Sabbath to anoint his body

 

Mark 16:1 When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus' body. 2 Very early on the first day of the week, just after sunrise, they were on their way to the tomb 3 and they asked each other, "Who will roll the stone away from the entrance of the tomb?" 4 But when they looked up, they saw that the stone, which was very large, had been rolled away. RV60  Cuando pasó el día de reposo,  María Magdalena,  María la madre de Jacobo,  y Salomé,  compraron especias aromáticas para ir a ungirle. 2 Y muy de mañana, el primer día de la semana, vinieron al sepulcro,  ya salido el sol. 3 Pero decían entre sí: ¿Quién nos removerá la piedra de la entrada del sepulcro?  4 Pero cuando miraron, vieron removida la piedra,  que era muy grande.

APP: don’t let the obstacles stop you from going forward…..

Three overwhelming problems as they set out to honor Jesus’ body.

First, the soldier guard would prevent them;

Second, the rock in the tomb’s doorway would be too heavy to move; and

third, Jesus’ body would have begun to decompose.

Against such obstacles, what could these three women expect to accomplish? Yet urged on by love and gratitude, they were determined to do what they could. The church’s mission—to send the gospel to all the world—is fraught with overwhelming problems. Any one of them appears devastating….what can a few missionaries accomplish? Yet like these solitary women on that Sunday morning, we go out with love and gratitude for Jesus and leave the big obstacles with God. When problems appear too strong to handle and you feel like quitting, remember that God is way out in front, already blazing a trail for you. Does a stone block your way, a stone too heavy to budge? Keep going and trusting. God moves big stones easily. Don’t balk at insurmountable problems; remember that God often prepares the way.

 

Mark 16:9  When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons. 10 She went and told those who had been with him and who were mourning and weeping. 11 When they heard that Jesus was alive and that she had seen him, they did not believe it. RV60  Habiendo,  pues,  resucitado Jesús por la mañana,  el primer día de la semana,  apareció primeramente a María Magdalena,  de quien había echado siete demonios.  (10)  Yendo ella,  lo hizo saber a los que habían estado con él,  que estaban tristes y llorando.  (11)  Ellos,  cuando oyeron que vivía,  y que había sido visto por ella,  no lo creyeron.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luke 8:1-3  After this, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The Twelve were with him,  2  and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out;  3  Joanna the wife of Cuza, the manager of Herod's household; Susanna; and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means. RV60  Aconteció después,  que Jesús iba por todas las ciudades y aldeas,  predicando y anunciando el evangelio del reino de Dios,  y los doce con él,  (2)  y algunas mujeres que habían sido sanadas de espíritus malos y de enfermedades:  María,  que se llamaba Magdalena,  de la que habían salido siete demonios,  (3)  Juana,  mujer de Chuza intendente de Herodes,  y Susana,  y otras muchas que le servían de sus bienes. [NBLH  que de sus bienes personales contribuían al sostenimiento de ellos].

APP: The (visible) church of Christ may be divided into two parties—those who serve Jesus and those who do not serve!

** This small summary paragraph is important not only because women are included but also because of the variety of women mentioned. Mary called Magdalene ministered in response to Jesus’ healing ministry. His exorcism of demons from her had drawn her to him. Though from the time of Gregory the Great she has had the reputation of a sinful woman, this text gives no indication that she was immoral. Joanna was the wife of a major political figure, Chuza, who served as Herod’s steward. Thus Luke shows that Jesus’ message had reached the highest social stratum, the palace. We are not told anything about Susanna. All these women contributed their resources to Jesus’ ministry. Their hearts were sensitive to God’s work, and they expressed this sensitivity through their generosity.

Jesus did not need their help. The mighty Saviour who could multiply a few loaves and fish into food for thousands could have called from the earth as much food as he required. By allowing his followers to minister to him, he proved their love. True love will count it a pleasure to give anything to the object loved. False love will often talk and profess a great deal but do and give nothing. This topic of ministering to Christ opens up a most important train of thought, and one which we will do well to consider.

The Lord Jesus Christ is continually testing his church today.

 

Luke 24:10 It was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the others with them who told this to the apostles. 11  But they did not believe the women, because their words seemed to them like nonsense. (RV60)  Eran María Magdalena,  y Juana,  y María madre de Jacobo,  y las demás con ellas,  quienes dijeron estas cosas a los apóstoles. 11  Mas a ellos les parecían locura [tonteria] las palabras de ellas,  y no las creían.

COME & SEE, GO & TELL! IS THE RESURRECTION MANDATE FOR THE CHURC even if they don’t initially believe the message!. Remember, you are just the messenger

Mary, the last one at the Cross and the first one at the tomb, was given the privilege of relaying the first resurrection message. The fact that the message was carried by women gives credibility and persuasive force to Luke’s account. No ancient person making up such a story would have women as the official witnesses. By Jewish law, women could not do so.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John 19:25  Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. (RV60)  Estaban junto a la cruz de Jesús su madre,  y la hermana de su madre,  María mujer de Cleofas,  y María Magdalena.

APP: Jesus knows those that are close to Him!

* his mother's sister = prob. Salomé [Mk 15:40], the sister of Mary and mother of James & John, the sons of Zebedee [Matt.27:56, 57; Mark 15:40]

Matthew 27:56 Mark 15:40 John 19:25
1. Mary Magdalene 1. Mary Magdalene 1. His Mother
2. Mary the mother of James and Joses 2. Mary the mother of James the Less and of Joses 2. His mother’s sister
3. The mother of the sons of Zebedee 3. Salome 3. Mary the (wife probably) of Clopas
    4. Mary Magdalene

 

John 20:1 Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance. (RV60)  El primer día de la semana,  María Magdalena fue de mañana,  siendo aún oscuro,  al sepulcro;  y vio quitada la piedra del sepulcro……….

……..John 20:18  Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: "I have seen the Lord!" And she told them that he had said these things to her. (NBLH)  María Magdalena fue y anunció a los discípulos: "¡He visto al Señor!," y que El le había dicho estas cosas.

Mary’s new responsibility was to testify to His risen presence….

Cf Matt.28:9  Suddenly Jesus met them. "Greetings," he said. They came to him, clasped his feet and worshiped him.  10  Then Jesus said to them, "Do not be afraid. Go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me."  RV60  he aquí,  Jesús les salió al encuentro,  diciendo:  ¡Salve!  [saludos] Y ellas,  acercándose,  abrazaron sus pies,  y le adoraron.  10 Entonces Jesús les dijo:  No temáis;  id,  dad las nuevas a mis hermanos,  para que vayan a Galilea,  y allí me verán.

It would have been selfish and disobedient for Mary to have clung to Jesus and kept Him to herself.

 

title Rabboni is used in only one other place in the Gospels, Mark 10:51 And answering him, Jesus said, "What do you want Me to do for you?" And the blind man said to Him, "Rabboni, [I want] to regain my sight!"] (NBLH)  Y dirigiéndose a él, Jesús le preguntó: "¿Qué deseas que haga por ti?" Y el ciego Le respondió: "Raboní (Mi Maestro), que recobre la vista."

 

Mary did what she could

            She was close to the cross

            She was there at the burial

            She came to anoint His body, BUT she never got to cause God had greater plans for her

            She was early at the tomb

            She carried the resurrection message

            SHE LIVED A LIFE OF GRATITUDE IN SERVICE FOR THE LORD

 

 

 

 

 

Sermon: Mary Magdalene the Faithful Servant

 

John 20:18 Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: "I have seen the Lord!" And she told them that he had said these things to her.

Mark 16:9 When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons.

Luke 8:2  and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out;

 

Matt 27:56 Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joses, and the mother of Zebedee's sons.

Mateo 27:61 Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were sitting there opposite the tomb.

Matt 28:1 After the Sabbath, at dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to look at the tomb.

Mark 15:40 Some women were watching from a distance. Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James the younger and of Joses, and Salome.

Mark 15:47 Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses saw where he was laid.

Mark 16:1 When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus' body.

Luke 24:10 It was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the others with them who told this to the apostles.

John 19:25 Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene.

John 20:1 Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance.

 

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