Faithlife
Faithlife

1 Chronicles

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 7 views
Notes & Transcripts

lass=MsoNormal style='text-indent:.25in;tab-stops:218.0pt'>                                             1 Chronicles 

The books of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles record the history of the Jews from the last judge (Samuel) and the establishment of the first king (Saul), to the exile of the nation to Babylon. The books of 1 and 2 Kings were written from the viewpoint of the prophets, while 1 and 2 Chronicles present the priestly viewpoint of Jewish history. There is an emphasis in Chronicles on the Levites, the building of the temple,

God’s covenant as recorded in Deuteronomy, and the holy city of Jerusalem. You might say that 1 and 2

Kings give us the political record and 1 and 2 Chronicles the religious record

Author: Ezra is probably the writer of the Chronicles. There is a striking similarity in style and language to the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah. Evidently Chronicles was written during the Babylonian captivity. The two Books of Chronicles not only constituted one book in the original, but apparently also included Ezra and Nehemiah. This lends support to the Jewish tradition of the authorship of Ezra.

Study Question for 1 Chronicles

Q. 1   Why do you think it was so important for the Jewish genealogy to take up the first nine chapters of 1 Chronicles?

Q.2  Match the seven names to the seven titles below: Amnon, Beriah, Achan, Nimrod, Er, Reuben  

       and Jabez.

     I.     _____________, the Mighty Hunter (1:10)

     II.     _____, the Wicked Son (2:3)

     III.     ____________, the Troubler of Israel (2:7)

     IV.____________, the Unclean (3:1)

     V._____________, the Undaunted (4:9–10)

     VI.   ______________, the Uncontrollable (5:1–2)

     VII.    _____________, the Unfortunate (7:20–23)

Q. 3   Who killed Saul?  (1 Sam. 31:3-6, 2 Sam. 1-15 and 1 Chron. 10:1-14.)

Q. 4   Why did Uzza die when he touched the Ark?  (1 Chron. 13:9-10?)

Q.5  As you read again which seems to be the same history story about David, what are some of the bad things that are found in David’s life that we have already read in 2 Samuel but are left out in the story told in 1 Chronicles?


                                             1 Chronicles

The books of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles record the history of the Jews from the last judge (Samuel) and the establishment of the first king (Saul), to the exile of the nation to Babylon. The books of 1 and 2 Kings were written from the viewpoint of the prophets, while 1 and 2 Chronicles present the priestly viewpoint of Jewish history. There is an emphasis in Chronicles on the Levites, the building of the temple,

God’s covenant as recorded in Deuteronomy, and the holy city of Jerusalem. You might say that 1 and 2

Kings give us the political record and 1 and 2 Chronicles the religious record.

(Or J.V. McGee says it in another way, “The Books of Samuel and the Books of Kings we were given Man’s viewpoint. This does not mean that those books were not inspired. They are inspired. But He gives first the human viewpoint, then the divine viewpoint. In 1 Chronicles we see why as God’s emphasis is on David. Where did David put the emphasis? He put it on the building of the temple of God”.)

 Remember David was called “a man after God’s own heart We want find the sin of David, his adultery or his lying or how he killed an innocent man. Why? If this is God record written in heaven, David’s sins were forgiven and forgotten.

So the Book of Samuel and Kings are showing us the history in man’s eyes and in the Books of Chronicles we are seeing the same story but God is to focus on parts of the story we might have over looked. Really God does this all through out His Word: In Genesis 1, He gives the story of creation but in chapter two He reviews over it again. Do you remember in Deuteronomy we saw it was the repeating of the Law that was given in Leviticus but only forty years later with the experience of the wilderness in it. In the Gospels we see four different men writing by the inspiration of God on the same account.  So God does repeat Himself for us to pay attention to His message.

Author: Ezra is probably the writer of the Chronicles. There is a striking similarity in style and language to the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah. Evidently Chronicles was written during the Babylonian captivity. The two Books of Chronicles not only constituted one book in the original, but apparently also included Ezra and Nehemiah. This lends support to the Jewish tradition of the authorship of Ezra.

Study Question for 1 Chronicles

Q. 1   Why do you think it was so important for the Jewish genealogy to take up the first nine chapters of 1 Chronicles?

Genealogies make boring reading for most people today, but they were essential to the Jews who had to keep accurate records of their family ties for many reasons.

For the Jews: actually an accurate genealogy record was more value than silver or gold. They had to know their tribe, clan, and family relationships because property ownership was supposed to stay within the tribe. In situations where a kinsman redeemer would rescue a poor person, he had to prove that he was indeed a near relative. (Remember the Book of Ruth.) The firstborn son received twice as much inheritance as did the other sons. Of course, the priests and Levites had to prove that they were from the tribe of Levi or they were not permitted to serve.

These hundreds of names, some of them difficult to pronounce, represent people whom God used to maintain the “living link” with the promises and covenants of the past. The Jews were chosen by God and given promises that would ultimately affect the entire world. Had there been a break in this chain of “living links,” the Savior could not have been born into this world. With the Genealogy we couldn’t prove His Kingship or how He fulfilled the prophecies that were given about His coming.  

Most of these people are unknown while a few of them are very famous, but God used all of them to accomplish His purposes. When you read your Bible, you remember people like Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Joshua, Samuel, and David, but were it not for a great many lesser-known people, these men would not have been on the scene. Let’s thank God for the “forgotten people” who helped the “famous people” get there!

Scattered throughout these genealogies are the names of people who are given special identification, and reflecting on them can teach us some important spiritual lessons.

Q.2  Match the seven names to the seven titles below: Amnon, Beriah, Achan, , Er, Reuben  

       and Jabez.

     I.     Nimrod, the Mighty Hunter (1:10)

I.     Nimrod, the Mighty Hunter (1:10)

The reference is to Gen. 10:8–10. The word “hunter” carries the connotation of hunting people, not hunting animals. He was a rebel who defied God and set up the infamous kingdom of Babylon. After the sons of Noah began to replenish the earth, it didn’t take long for their descendants to turn against the Lord. The lesson of the flood didn’t penetrate very deep.

     II.     _____, the Wicked Son (2:3)   Er, the Wicked Son (2:3)

See Genesis 38:7 We don’t know the nature of Er’s sin, but it was something serious enough for God to killed him. His brother Onan refused to marry the widow and carry on the brother’s name and family, so he was also killed. See Deut. 25:5–10. It was important to God that the Jewish people continue to multiply, for He had some special tasks for them to fulfill. The whole story about Judah and Tamar seems disgusting to us, yet Tamar is listed in the genealogy of Jesus Christ (Matt. 1:3).

     III.     ____________, the Troubler of Israel (2:7) Achan, the Troubler of Israel (2:7)

Read Joshua 6–7. His sin was in violating a ban that Joshua had put on all the spoil of Jericho because it was dedicated to the Lord. Achan thought he had gotten away with stealing the loot, but the defeat of Israel’s army at Ai led to his discovery and execution. One sinner can bring trouble to a whole nation.

     IV.____________, the Unclean (3:1) Amnon, the Unclean (3:1)

He violated his half-sister Tamar and was eventually slain by Absalom (2 Sam. 13–14). Some of the firstborn sons listed in these chapters are not models of virtue. Er was killed by the Lord (2:3); Amnon was killed by his brother (3:1); and Reuben lost the birthright because he violated his father’s concubine (5:1–2). In Israel, the firstborn had special privileges, but these three men threw away their privileges for the “pleasures of sin for a season.” “(Thank about Esau who sold his for a bowl of sup.)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  V._____________, the Undaunted (4:9–10) Jabez, the Undaunted (4:9–10)

Undaunted = unconcerned

Jabez was the head of a family of the tribe of Judah (1 Ch. 4:9–10), an ‘honourable’ man whose prayer God answered. But his mother gave him a name that he had to overcome.

In Hebrew, the name “Jabez” means “to grieve or a man of sorrow.” It certainly wasn’t the fault of Jabez that his mother had such a difficult delivery, but she gave him a name that would remind him and others of her pain. It would seem from the text that his brethren rejected him and were not “noble” men of character. Jabez overcame his name and his family problems by turning to God in prayer and asking for His blessing.

(Let me say this, we may have been born into a situation that could destroy our testimony.  Or our past before we got save might come back to haunt us. Prayer can change things.)

 

     VI.   ______________, the Uncontrollable (5:1–2) Reuben, the Uncontrollable (5:1–2)

How strange that a man’s sins should get into an official genealogy! The deed is recorded in Gen. 35:22; and in Gen. 49:3–4, Jacob brought it up publicly at his deathbed and judged him for his lack of self-control. Reuben lost the birthright, which was given to Ephraim and Manasseh (Gen. 48:15–22). One act of sin can be costly for the sinner and for his or her family!

(yes we can get forgiveness for sin but the results of that sin goes on)

 

     VII.    _____________, the Unfortunate (7:20–23) Beriah the Unfortunate (7:20–23)

When Ephraim’s two sons, Ezer and Elead, tried to seize some cattle, they were killed, and their father was plunged into grief. He found solace in loving his wife, and she gave birth to a son whom Ephraim named Beriah, which means “misfortune.” He and Jabez and Benjamin (Benoni) could have formed a fellowship of men with miserable names.

Q. 3   Who killed Saul?  (1 Sam. 31:3-6, 2 Sam. 1-15 and 1 Chron. 10:1-14.)

1 Sa 31:3-6

3And the battle went sore against Saul, and the archers hit him; and he was sore wounded of the archers.
4Then said Saul unto his armourbearer, Draw thy sword, and thrust me through therewith; lest these uncircumcised come and thrust me through, and abuse me. But his armourbearer would not; for he was sore afraid. Therefore Saul took a sword, and fell upon it.
5And when his armourbearer saw that Saul was dead, he fell likewise upon his sword, and died with him.
6So Saul died, and his three sons, and his armourbearer, and all his men, that same day together.

2 Sa 1:9-14

9He said unto me again, Stand, I pray thee, upon me, and slay me: for anguish is come upon me, because my life is yet whole in me.
10So I stood upon him, and slew him, because I was sure that he could not live after that he was fallen: and I took the crown that was upon his head, and the bracelet that was on his arm, and have brought them hither unto my lord.
11Then David took hold on his clothes, and rent them; and likewise all the men that were with him:
12And they mourned, and wept, and fasted until even, for Saul, and for Jonathan his son, and for the people of the LORD, and for the house of Israel; because they were fallen by the sword.
13And David said unto the young man that told him, Whence art thou? And he answered, I am the son of a stranger, an Amalekite.
14And David said unto him, How wast thou not afraid to stretch forth thine hand to destroy the LORD’S anointed?

1 Ch 10:1-14

1Now the Philistines fought against Israel; and the men of Israel fled from before the Philistines, and fell down slain in mount Gilboa.
2And the Philistines followed hard after Saul, and after his sons; and the Philistines slew Jonathan, and Abinadab, and Malchishua, the sons of Saul.
3And the battle went sore against Saul, and the archers hit him, and he was wounded of the archers.
4Then said Saul to his armourbearer, Draw thy sword, and thrust me through therewith; lest these uncircumcised come and abuse me. But his armourbearer would not; for he was sore afraid. So Saul took a sword, and fell upon it.
5And when his armourbearer saw that Saul was dead, he fell likewise on the sword, and died.
6So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house died together.
7And when all the men of Israel that were in the valley saw that they fled, and that Saul and his sons were dead, then they forsook their cities, and fled: and the Philistines came and dwelt in them.
8And it came to pass on the morrow, when the Philistines came to strip the slain, that they found Saul and his sons fallen in mount Gilboa.
9And when they had stripped him, they took his head, and his armour, and sent into the land of the Philistines round about, to carry tidings unto their idols, and to the people.
10And they put his armour in the house of their gods, and fastened his head in the temple of Dagon.
11And when all Jabeshgilead heard all that the Philistines had done to Saul,
12They arose, all the valiant men, and took away the body of Saul, and the bodies of his sons, and brought them to Jabesh, and buried their bones under the oak in Jabesh, and fasted seven days.
13So Saul died for his transgression which he committed against the LORD, even against the word of the LORD, which he kept not, and also for asking counsel of one that had a familiar spirit, to enquire of it;
14And enquired not of the LORD: therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom unto David the son of Jesse.

Q. 4   Why did Uzza die when he touched the Ark?  (1 Chron. 13:9-10?)

Q.5  As you read again which seems to be the same history story about David, what are some of the bad things that are found in David’s life that we have already read in 2 Samuel but are left out in the story told in 1 Chronicles?

Introductory Notes to 1 and 2 Chronicles

The books of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles record the history of the Jews from the last judge (Samuel) and the establishment of the first king (Saul), to the exile of the nation to Babylon. The books of 1 and 2 Kings were written from the viewpoint of the prophets, while 1 and 2 Chronicles present the priestly viewpoint of Jewish history. There is an emphasis in Chronicles on the Levites, the building of the temple, God’s covenant as recorded in Deuteronomy, and the holy city of Jerusalem. You might say that 1 and 2 Kings give us the political record and 1 and 2 Chronicles the religious record. Second Chronicles records at least five “revivals” in the history of Judah (chaps. 15, 20, 23, 24, 25, and 29, 31).

The chronologies in 1 Chron. 1–9 belong before 1 Sam. 1 and are the “living links” with the past. It was important to the Jews that they know their family history and be able to claim their place in the nation. This was especially true of the priests and Levites who served in the tabernacle and then the temple.

The writer of 1 Chronicles picks up the royal record at the death of Saul (1 Chron. 10). It is interesting to note what he omits from the record: David’s long conflict with Saul; the rivalry with Ish-bosheth (2 Sam. 2–4); David’s sin with Bathsheba; David’s family problems with Amnon and Absalom; Adonijah’s attempt to get the throne from Solomon; the sins of Solomon; and much of the history of the kings of Israel (the Northern Kingdom). The record focuses on the kings of Judah and emphasizes God’s choice of David and his descendants to reign from Jerusalem. If you studied only the record in 1 and 2 Chronicles, you would never know that David and Solomon had ever sinned! According to the writer of 2 Chronicles, it was not Solomon’s sin that caused the division of the kingdom, but Jeroboam’s political scheming. Both are true, but it is interesting to see the priestly viewpoint that almost idealized both David and Solomon. After all, David provided the wealth for the building of the temple, as well as the songs, musical instruments, and organization for the Levites; and Solomon built the temple.

The book shows that God blesses His people when they obey His will and disciplines them when they disobey. God is true to His covenant even if His people prove false to Him. When God’s longsuffering ended, He turned the people of Judah over to the Babylonians and permitted the enemy to destroy the temple and the city of Jerusalem. Second Chronicles ends with a copy of the decree of Cyrus allowing the Jews to return to their land, and thus parallels the beginning of Ezra. The writer sees continuity in the history of the people, because God is guiding them and accomplishing His purposes through them, in spite of their sins.

A helpful volume to use in studying 1 and 2 Chronicles is A Harmony of Samuel, Kings and Chronicles by William D. Crockett (Baker Book Hous

 

1 Chronicles 22–29

Since the record in Chronicles was written from the priestly viewpoint, we would expect the strong emphasis here on the building of the temple. It’s remarkable that the temple was built on the property David purchased from Ornan, a reminder of David’s great sin in numbering the people (1 Chron. 21). The temple was built by Solomon, a son of Bathsheba, the woman with whom David had committed adultery. Only God can take a man’s two greatest sins and build a temple out of them. “But where sin abounded, grace did much more abound” (Rom. 5:20).

I.     The Builder of the Temple (22:1–19)

David’s heart had always been set on building a temple for the Lord (see 2 Sam. 7), but since he had been fully occupied fighting wars, he was not able to do the work. The fact that he was a warrior and had shed blood was another reason. Throughout his life, David had gathered treasures to be used for the temple, and these he now turned over to his son Solomon. God gave David the plans for the temple (1 Chron. 28:11–12, 19) just as He had given Moses the plans for the tabernacle (Ex. 25:40). When you are going to do something for the Lord on earth, be sure you get the plans from heaven. And if the Lord won’t let you do something that is really on your heart, try to help the other person do it.

Solomon was anointed king privately, in the presence of the leaders, so that the throne would be secure (vv. 17–19); and then the new king was publicly presented to the people (chap. 28). Our Lord Jesus has been anointed King, but His public presentation has yet to be made. Meanwhile, we who trust Him should assist Him in the building of His temple, the church (Matt. 16:18; Eph. 2:19–22). David drafted the “aliens and strangers” in the land (non-Israelites) and forced them to work on the temple (v. 2). But the Lord has taken sinners who were “outsiders” and made them fellow citizens and living stones in His temple (Eph. 2:19–22; 1 Peter 2:5). What a grace!

David admonished Solomon to trust the Lord and obey Him; otherwise, he could never build the temple to the glory of God. God gave Solomon and the nation rest from war (the name Solomon is related to the Hebrew word “shalom” which means “peace”), and He would give him wisdom in doing the work. We can’t begin to calculate the purchasing power of the wealth that David gathered (v. 14).

So, David gave Solomon the wealth to build the temple, the plans, the workers, and the cooperation of the princes of the land (vv. 17–19). But the “heart” of the matter was the heart of Solomon (v. 19). If Solomon’s heart was right with God, then God would bless his endeavors. There is nothing “automatic” about the service of the Lord. If we are right with Him, He will prosper our efforts (Josh. 1:8; Matt. 6:33).

 

 

II.     The Ministers in the Temple (23:1–26:32)

Second Chronicles 29:25 informs us that David’s plan for organizing the priests and Levites was given to him by the Lord through his two prophets, Gad and Nathan. Not only the plan for the temple itself, but also what went on in the temple and how it was organized, were commanded by the Lord. The local church today needs to heed the directions given in the NT for its organization and ministry. Too often, we import the ideas of the world and reject the ideals of the Word.

There were 38,000 Levites available and David divided them into four units: 24,000 to supervise the work in the temple; 4,000 as musicians; 4,000 as doorkeepers, which involved the temple treasuries and storerooms; and 6,000 to be scattered throughout the nation to minister as judges and teachers of the law. It is not enough for the people to come to God’s house; the servants of God must also go to the people. Note that David provided the instruments for the musicians to use (23:5), and he wrote many of the songs that they used to worship the Lord.

During the years of Israel’s wandering, the descendants of Levi were assigned to take down the tabernacle and carry its various parts, reassembling the tabernacle at the place God told the people to camp (see Num. 3–4). Now that they would be serving in a permanent sanctuary, the three clans of the sons of Levi were assigned to other duties.

The priests were divided into twenty-four courses (chap. 24; see Luke 1:5), which means they served in “shifts,” possibly two weeks each month. David did things “decently and in order” (1 Cor. 14:40). The specific assignments were given by lot (Luke 1:8–9).

The gatekeepers (chap. 26) guarded the temple and the storerooms in it. You will recall that Obed-edom (26:4) was the man who guarded the ark of the covenant before it was finally placed in the tent (1 Chron. 13:13–14). The gatekeepers cast lots to see where they would be assigned (26:13). Keep in mind that the Jewish people brought tithes and offerings to the temple as a part of their worship, and all these commodities had to be stored, inventoried, and protected. Most of all, the temple treasury contained valuables dedicated to the Lord, as well as material needed for the service of the Lord (see 1 Chron. 9:27–34). It was important that the spices, flour, and other items be kept from contamination. How unfortunate it is when that which defiles gets into the house of the Lord.

As we review these chapters and their many names, we are struck with the fact that God uses people to accomplish His work, people with different talents and different ministries. Some of the temple servants led in singing praises to God; others played the instruments; some guarded the treasures; some kept the inventory of the gifts brought to the temple. The priests offered the sacrifices to the Lord and cared for the daily service of worship. Everything was organized for efficiency, and the total temple ministry brought glory to the Lord. Even those who had to work “the night shift” praised the Lord for the privilege of worshiping and serving Him. (Ps. 134)

 

 

 

 

III.     The Protectors of the Temple and the Land (27:1–34)

A.     The army (vv. 1–15).

We move now from the temple organization to the civil government, for in the nation of Israel, both were ordered by God and governed by His divine law. There were twelve army units and each one served for one month of the year. Of course, when needed, the units could be called together quickly.

If you compare 1 Chron. 11:10ff with the list of leaders in vv. 2–15, you will see that David’s “mighty men” were in charge of the army. He had proved these men in many places of testing, and he knew he could trust them.

B.     The civil servants (vv. 16–24).

Not only were there capable soldiers to lead each of the twelve units of the army, but there were capable officers assigned to the tribes of Israel (vv. 16–22). David had a “chain of command” in the nation so that each tribe had a representative before the king. We have no record of David’s brother Elihu anywhere else in Scripture (v. 18). It’s possible that this is a variation of the name “Eliab” (1 Chron. 2:13). The Hebrew word “brother” was often applied to any relative, but it would seem that an official listing such as this would aim for accuracy.

How interesting that a son of Abner was one of David’s trusted officers (v. 21). Abner had tried to maintain Saul’s dynasty after Saul was slain and had created problems for David (2 Sam. 1–4). David obeyed Deut. 24:16.

C.     David’s overseers (vv. 25–34).

In modern society, government leaders must divest themselves of anything that would lead to conflict of interest, but not so in ancient monarchies. The king was a very wealthy man, thanks to the spoils of war, the tribute brought by conquered rulers, and the profit made from his lands. In fairness to David, we should recognize that, since there were no taxes on the citizens, he had to use much of this income for the administration of his own government. All of these holdings had to be supervised, the laborers paid, and the profits guarded.

IV. The Encouragement to Build the Temple (28:1–29:30)

The writer is giving us “the last words of David” (1 Chron. 23:27) as well as the last works of David as he prepared Solomon and the people for the building of the temple. What a wonderful thing that David sought to build a temple to the glory of God and not a monument to his own glory. He could die knowing that future generations would have a beautiful house of prayer and praise where they could honor the Lord. David not only “served his own generation” (Acts 13:36), which every child of God should do, but he also served generations to come. He provided the materials to build the temple; he organized the temple ministry; he wrote songs for the temple singers; and he even designed musical instruments for the Levites to play.

David gathered all the leaders of Israel and exhorted and encouraged them to support Solomon in his administration, especially in the building of the temple.

A.     God’s choices (28:1–7).

David emphasized the fact that it was God who chose the tribe of Judah to be the royal tribe (v. 4; Gen. 49:8–10); and from Judah, God chose David’s family to be the royal family (1 Sam. 16:6–13; 2 Sam. 7). Then God chose Solomon to be David’s successor and the one to build the temple. It was a solemn obligation on Solomon’s part, for these were God’s chosen people; and the temple was for the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

B.     David’s charges (28:8–10, 20–21).

First, David charged all the officers and people to obey all of God’s commands (v. 8). What good was a beautiful temple if the people were disobedient to their God? They owed it to the Lord and to one another, as fellow citizens in God’s assembly, to live according to the Law that God had graciously given to them. The Jews owned the land by virtue of God’s covenant with Abraham (Gen. 12:1–3; 13:14–18), but they possessed and enjoyed the land only so long as they obeyed God’s Word. See Deut. 27–30. If they wanted to maintain possession of the land and leave it to the next generation, then they had to be an obedient people. It’s a solemn thought that we are stewards of all that God gives us, and, if we aren’t faithful to the Lord, there will be nothing to leave our children and grandchildren.

Then David charged Solomon (28:9–10, 20–21) to be faithful to discharge his responsibility as king and builder of the temple. “Be strong and of good courage” (vv. 10, 20) reminds us of God’s admonitions to Joshua (Josh. 1:6–7, 9, 18). The tragedy is that Solomon did not maintain a perfect heart before the Lord, but loved foreign women and worshiped their false gods (1 Kings 11). A perfect heart is not a sinless heart, for nobody can live without sinning in some way. It means a heart totally devoted to the Lord, a sincere heart. When Solomon began to worship other gods along with Jehovah, he had a divided heart and was not true to the Lord. It was when Solomon forsook the Word of God that he began to worship idols (see Deut. 17:14–20; Josh. 1:8).

C.     David’s contributions (28:11–19).

Everything Solomon needed for the great building project was provided by the Lord through David: the plans for the building, the organization of the priests and Levites, the material wealth, and the people to do the job. Since we don’t know the buying power of gold and silver in that day, we can’t accurately calculate the worth of all this material; but certainly it was in the tens of millions of dollars.

D.     David’s challenge (29:1–9).

David knew that his people must have a share in the cost of the temple, so he asked the leaders of the nation to contribute, and they did so willingly. David had first set the example in giving, and he reminded the people that they were giving to the Lord (29:1). Their giving was an act of worship (29:5b), and they gave generously. The mentioning of “gold, silver, and precious stones” reminds us of 1 Cor. 3:10–23 and the language used to describe the building of the local church.

E.     David’s consecration (29:10–19).

David prayed and dedicated the offering, the new king, and the people to the Lord. He blessed the Lord and extolled Him for His wonderful attributes. He expressed his humility before God (29:14) and acknowledged that even the wealth that he and his people had brought originally came from the Lord!”But who am I, and what is my people, that we should be able to offer so willingly after this sort? for all things come of thee, and of thine own have we given thee.”

. The fact that we are “strangers and sojourners” in this world (v. 15) ought to encourage us to give generously to the Lord, for only what we give to Him will last (Matt. 6:19–21). Life is brief and we can’t keep anything for ourselves or take it with us when we go (1 Tim. 6:7; see Ps. 90:1–11).

Read chapter 29 carefully and note how the people gave and why they gave; then read 2 Cor. 8–9 and note how Paul taught many of these same truths about giving.

F.     Solomon’s coronation (29:20–30).

In a great worship service where the Lord was glorified, David passed the scepter to his son Solomon, and the people rejoiced at God’s goodness. God was able to magnify Solomon because Solomon magnified the Lord (see Phil. 1:20; Josh. 3:7). David died but the throne of Israel continued. God buries His workmen but continues His work.

[1]


----

[1]%0 Book
%A Wiersbe, Warren W.
%D 1993
%T Wiersbe's expository outlines on the Old Testament
%C Wheaton, IL
%I Victor Books
%P 1 Ch 1:1
%K Bible. O.T
%K ; Bible. O.T


RELATED MEDIA
See the rest →
RELATED SERMONS
See the rest →