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The Beatitudes

Matthew  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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In 1952 David Lean directed a dramatic - but fictional - movie about the first test pilots to break the sound barrier. The British released it as Breaking the Barrier, it was titled “Breaking the Sound Barrier” when it was released in the United States. In the movie, o plane had yet flown faster than the speed of sound. Many people didn’t believe [that] it was even possible. Some thought that the plane would disintegrate under the forces generated at the speed of sound.
Many years ago there was a dramatic movie about the first test pilots to break the sound barrier. No plane had ever flown faster than the speed of sound. Many people didn’t believe it was possible. Some thought the plane would disintegrate under the forces that would be generated. Eventually, in the movie, various pilots took their planes over the magic figure of 735 miles per hour, only to have the planes disintegrate with the huge vibrations, or to crash. The controls, it seemed, refused to work properly once the plane came to the sound barrier.
In the movie, various pilots took their planes over that magic figure of 735 miles (761.2) per hour, only to have the planes disintegrate with the huge vibrations, or to crash. The controls, it seemed, refused to work properly once the plane came to the sound barrier.
Finally, at the climax of the movie, a test pilot figured out what to do. It seemed that when the plane broke the sound barrier the controls began to work backwards. Pulling the stick to make the plane bring its nose up sent it downwards instead. With great daring, he flew to the same speed, and at the critical moment, instead of pulling the stick back, he pushed it forward. Normally this would send the plane into a dive, but his hunch had been correct. The nose came up, and the plane flew on, fast and free, faster than anyone had travelled before.
Finally, at the climax of the movie, another test pilot figured out what to do. It seemed that when the plane broke the sound barrier the controls began to work backwards. Pulling the stick to make the plane bring its nose up sent it downwards instead. Greatly daring, he flew to the same speed. At the critical moment, instead of pulling the stick back, he pushed it forwards. That would normally send the plane into a dive, but his hunch had been correct. The nose came up, and the plane flew on, fast and free, faster than anyone had travelled before.
The story is not historically accurate. Chuck Yeager, the first human to move faster than the speed of sound in real life, was often asked whether he’d done it the way it was shown in the movie, but he insisted it wasn’t like that. However, the story gives a graphic illustration of what Jesus is doing in these apparently simple words. He is taking the controls and making them work backwards (modified from Tom Wright, Matthew for Everyone, Part 1: Chapters 1-15 (London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 2004), 35)
The movie is not historically accurate. Chuck Yeager, the first human to break the sound barrier, was often asked whether he’d done it the way it was shown in the movie, but he insisted that it wasn’t like that. However, the story gives a graphic illustration of the how Jesus says the blessed life is lived.
(modified from Tom Wright, Matthew for Everyone, Part 1: Chapters 1-15 (London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 2004), 35
OR GYROSCOPE?
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