Drop files to upload.
Faithlife
Faithlife

The Promise to Praying Disciples

Praying Disciples  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 1 view
Notes & Transcripts
300 Quotations for Preachers What the Church Needs Is Prayer

What the Church needs today is not more machinery or better, not new organizations or more and novel methods, but men whom the Holy Ghost can use—men of prayer, men mighty in prayer. The Holy Ghost does not flow through methods, but through men. He does not come on machinery, but on men. He does not anoint plans, but men—men of prayer.

300 Quotations for Preachers Prayer in the Morning

If God is not first in our thoughts and efforts in the morning, he will be in the last place the remainder of the day.

PRAY WITH ME PLEASE. ASK GOD TO FILL ME WITH HIS GLORY AND TO GIVE YOU SPIRITUAL EYES AND EARS TO SEE AND HEAR.
READ TEXT
Luke 11:9–13 CSB
“So I say to you, ask, and it will be given to you. Seek, and you will find. Knock, and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened. What father among you, if his son asks for a fish, will give him a snake instead of a fish? Or if he asks for an egg, will give him a scorpion? If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him?”
Have you ever heard someone say very casually, “I talk to the ‘Big Man Upstairs’ quite often”, and did it cause you to cringe like it does me? What makes that statement even more cringe worthy is when someone who is a long time Christian says it so easily.
Have you ever heard someone say very casually, “I talk to the ‘Big Man Upstairs’ quite often”, and did it cause you to cringe like it does me? What makes that statement even more cringe worthy is when someone who is a long time Christian says it so easily.
Without a proper Biblical understanding of prayer, a believer will fall on one of the two extremes. He/she will either take this cavalier, reckless, and irreverent approach in talking with God. Someone with this mindset must recognize the sinfulness in this thought process towards prayer. The first 8 verses of addresses this type of prayer attitude. that we will read in moment, addresses the opposite extreme in prayer attitudes.
ADVERTISEMENT
In the second church I pastored I dealt with the 2nd attitude. I preached a sermon on the passage at the end of , where he called upon all of God’s people to recommit their lives to the Lord by signing their names upon a binding agreement, and at the invitation time I asked the church members to come forward and symbolically do the same.
The following Monday, a man spent most of the day in my office telling me how wrong I was because I had called the people to sin in public. His basis was on the passage where Jesus tells us to go into our closet and pray in private.
Some Christians will follow this thought that prayer to God is something that has to be rigid and ritualistic. They follow a cautious and calculated approach to praying. Christians who pray this way focus legalistically on the very private nature of prayer, and see God as some cosmological dictator whom you have to timidly come into His presence.
Other Christians will follow the extreme that prayer to God is something that has to be rigid and ritualistic. They follow a cautious and calculated approach to praying. Christians who pray this way focus legalistically on the very private nature of prayer, and see God as some cosmological dictator whom you have to timidly come into His presence.
We find here in Luke that
Jesus teaches us here in these verses, that even though God is a Holy God we must hold up in high respect as a subject does his King , He is also a Loving God who we can come close to as a son does his father.
I really like how one devotional writer commented on the subject: “To the believer, God is not the “big man upstairs,” or an angry judge, or a mean ogre. Nor is he someone you must appease. No, he is your heavenly Father. And you know him as such because you have been born of God and God has sent His Spirit into your heart. So, when you pray, you cry out “Abba” Father. And crying out to God as your Father changes everything about prayer.
It makes prayer personal. What was once maybe nothing more than a religious ritual to you or something you did to be noticed by others is now an intimate conversation with your Father – a conversation anchored by the truth that God “rewards those who earnestly seek him” ().”
It makes prayer personal. What was once maybe nothing more than a religious ritual to you or something you did to be noticed by others is now an intimate conversation with your Father – a conversation anchored by the truth that God “rewards those who earnestly seek him” ().”
When you seek to be a praying disciple, take the balanced approach we find here in and God responds to you with 4 promises. There is:
When you take the balanced approach as praying disciples God responds with 4 promises. There is:
Prayer is made out to be a complicated ordeal when it really doesn’t have to be.
I explained to a new Christian just this past week about prayer in this manner. When you pray, let it be going to God the Father like your sons come to you. When they are concerned, scared, worried, have questions, whatever, they do not hesitate to come and just start talking. Let that be exactly how you come to God. The faith of a child kind of praying.
The same Greek word translated here “ask” is the same word used by Jesus to ask something from His Father.
John 14:16 CSB
And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Counselor to be with you forever.
Expository Outlines from Luke 18. The Christian and Prayer (Luke 11:1–13)

Prayer does not depend on the language we use but on the attitude of our heart.

This kind of heart attitude in prayer means coming to the Lord as beggar goes to a generous person. Do not demand anything from God. Simply go trustingly to Him, asking the Father to care for your needs as a Father would his children.
John
Unfortunately, a lot of believers are confused about how prayer works. Maybe you can identify with this person’s question…
John 14:16 CSB
And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Counselor to be with you forever.
“I don't get why when people pray for something and get it, they think it was because of their faith. And if they don’t get what they prayed for, they think they don't have enough faith!”
This may be the most common misconception about prayer – that if you have enough faith, you’ll get anything you ask for from God. Another mistake is thinking that since God already knows what you need, prayer is unnecessary.
Clearly, there’s a lot of confusion surrounding prayer. But if you truly want to be free from anxiety, you need to know how prayer really works! It’s not a magic bullet or an instant fix. It’s an anchor. Prayer is a conversation with God, one in which you recognize that God is bigger than all your problems.
That is why we can count on the next promise.
Jesus makes this kind of promise when He says that asking means receiving, seeking means finding, and knocking means entering. The one who trust God for his/her needs is promised the faithfulness of God in giving what is requested.
Luke: An Introduction and Commentary 3. Asking and Giving (11:9–13)

Jesus tells his followers to ask, to seek and to knock. He assures them that in each case there will be the appropriate response. All three verbs are continuous: Jesus is not speaking of single activities, but of those that persist. He is speaking of an attitude similar to that taught by the parable. The repetition in verse 10 underlines the certainty of the response. People ought not to think of God as unwilling to give: he is always ready to give good gifts to his people.

God is like 7-11 used to be
God is like 7-11 used to be

With all three commands in this verse, Jesus encourages His followers to anticipate God’s generosity and kindness.

You also know your Father cares for you. He is interested and concerned and already has his ear in your direction. You don’t have to beg and plead to get him to pay attention. That’s what the pagans do. But you don’t pray like the pagans do, because you know that he “knows what you need before you ask him.”
You also know your Father cares for you. He is interested and concerned and already has his ear in your direction. You don’t have to beg and plead to get him to pay attention. That’s what the pagans do. But you don’t pray like the pagans do, because you know that he “knows what you need before you ask him.”
Read , and ,
The deepest cry of your heart is to know God hears you when you pray. And you want assurance that you will receive what you ask for.
“And if we know that he hears… we know that we have…” ()
are part of a longer passage where John explains a list of things "we know" as the result of having this testimony in our hearts: "God has given us eternal life, and this life is in his Son." ()
But notice how John wrote verse 15. He didn't say you eventually will receive what you asked of God, but rather that you already have received what you asked of God.
Where does this come from? Verse 14 explains it. First, as a result of knowing that you have eternal life (Verse 13), you have confidence to approach God. Since you couldn't have eternal life without the indwelling Holy Spirit, and the Holy Spirit cannot indwell a sinful person, then this confidence is the direct result of the completed work of Jesus.
Jesus died once and for all for sin and He rose victorious over death. Sin can never separate you from God again and eternal life is yours. Therefore, since you know you have eternal life, you also know you are a forgiven person. Completely free from fear, you can boldly walk into God's presence.
You can walk into His presence with boldness, but He intends that you also come in with a level of genuineness because he gives you a:
When prayers are not answered for believers, the problem does not lie in the one receiving the prayer rather in the one offering the prayer.
Luke: An Introduction and Commentary 3. Asking and Giving (11:9–13)

This is driven home with a couple of illustrations from human conduct. Jesus asks what father will give harmful things, a serpent or a scorpion, when his child asks for something to eat.

Luke: An Introduction and Commentary 3. Asking and Giving (11:9–13)

it is important that they do their part by asking. Jesus does not say and does not mean that, if we pray, we will always get exactly what we ask for. After all, ‘No’ is just as definite an answer as ‘Yes’. He is saying that true prayer is neither unheard nor unheeded. It is always answered in the way God sees is best.

It is unthinkable that men would give such evil gifts to their children. But if evil people do not harm their children, but, on the contrary, do them good, how much more will God do good to his children? This good is not left in general terms: he will give the Holy Spirit. Luke is interested in the work of the Spirit and here he sees the gift of the Spirit as our highest good.
because you have the indwelling Spirit, you can listen to his promptings. He is renewing your mind; that is, teaching you to think properly. As the result of offering yourself to him, you know his will ().
There’s nothing God wants more than to make you powerfully aware of his will – his desire to conform you to Jesus, your forgiveness, eternal life, love, joy, peace and, perhaps greatest of all, that he is going to finish what he started in you ().
Therefore, when the Spirit prompts you to pray, you will be doing so according to his will – and you will know God hears you. Therefore, you know that you already have what you asked of him.
Conclusion: Our sincerity back to God comes in the form of obedience to His will we find through our praying. The answer in prayer may not be what you want to hear, but we see from Jesus teaching here that the answer we receive is the answer that benefits us the greatest and for His glory.
Our response needs to be acceptance of the answer through obedience.
When God puts a period, do not try to change it to a question mark.

“The purpose of prayer is not to get man’s will done in heaven but to get God’s will done on earth.”

How do you obey God:
Fear - Because you have to
Reward - because you might get something
Love - because you love the Father as your own
The theological lesson here is that true prayer is based solely on the fact of our sonship, our having what Jesus has. It has nothing to do with friendship. Persistence is taught here, but it is not the main focus of this passage. What is being taught here is the fact that God cares for His own.
The truth lesson here can be sum up as: “The person who truly prays the model prayer will find his prayers answered even when those prayers are petitions for personal need.”
(Butler, T. C. (2000). Luke (Vol. 3, p. 185). Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers.)
God loves us as His own because we are His own. We can trust the promises that he cares for His own and in the best way for us.
Butler, T. C. (2000). Luke (Vol. 3, p. 185). Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers.
Fear - Because you have to
Reward - because you might get something
Love - because you love the Father as your own
RELATED MEDIA
See the rest →
RELATED SERMONS
See the rest →