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Between the Prophecy and the promise

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Intro: When we look at the ministry of Isaiah the first thing we must make note of is that Isaiah is serving the Lord in a difficult day. (Ad-lib) (we are in difficult days in America and the world...for the Bible says perilous times shall come but there is still a word from The Lord) Yes this was a difficult time to speak for God for the people of Israel have turned their backs on the Lord Who redeemed them, and they are facing terrible chastisement because of their sins. The nation is under attack by the wicked, brutal Assyrians... The people are terrified and obviously concerned about their future. In the midst of this difficult hour, Isaiah stands forth as a Prophet of correction, hope, and comfort.
King Hezekiah was one of the greatest kings in the history of Judah. He was born in 740BC and he died in 686BC. He was the king for 29 years. Under his leadership the nation of Judah experienced many great religious reforms. His reign is summarized in . Not only was he a godly king, but there were some amazing miracles associated with the reign of Hezekiah. When the Assyrian king Sennacherib surrounded Jerusalem, Hezekiah prayed and God sent His angel during the night and killed 185,000 Assyrian soldiers, thus saving His people. In our text, Hezekiah falls ill and is told by the Prophet Isaiah that he is going to die,
Between the Prophecy and The Promise?
preposition
preposition: between; preposition: bet.
1. at, into, or across the space separating (two objects or regions). "the border between Mexico and the United States"synonyms:in the space separating, in the middle of, with one on either side; amid, amidst; archaic betwixt "Philip stood between his parents"
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2. in the period separating (two points in time). "they snack between meals"

In those days Hezekiah became ⌊deathly ill⌋,a and Isaiah the son of Amoz the prophet came to him and said to him, “Thus says Yahweh, ‘Command your house, for you are about to die; you will not recover.

Set your affairs in order, for you are going to die. You will not recover from this illness.”

‘Put your household in order, because you are dying. You will not survive.’ ”

Amplified Bible Chapter 20

Set your house in order, for you shall die; you shall not recover.

The Message Chapter 20

“Put your affairs in order; you’re about to die—you haven’t long to live.”

v. 1. Hezekiah takes the matter to the Lord in prayer...
v. 2. God hears him and before Isaiah can even leave the palace, , God answers the prayer and sends Isaiah back to tell the king that he will recover and live another 15 years. Hezekiah asks for proof that God will do this amazing thing and asks the Lord to move the sun backward 10 degrees, or about 20 minutes and God answers this prayer too.
2 Kings 20:4–6 NRSV
Before Isaiah had gone out of the middle court, the word of the Lord came to him: “Turn back, and say to Hezekiah prince of my people, Thus says the Lord, the God of your ancestor David: I have heard your prayer, I have seen your tears; indeed, I will heal you; on the third day you shall go up to the house of the Lord. I will add fifteen years to your life. I will deliver you and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria; I will defend this city for my own sake and for my servant David’s sake.”
The Number 3
• Jesus' ministry covered 3    Passovers.
Mary stayed with Elizabeth 3 months. Jesus was missing for 3 days when He was twelve years old. Jesus took 3 men, Peter, James and John, up on the Mt. of Transfiguration. Jesus prophesized that He would arise from the dead on the 3rd day. Saul was blinded for 3 days. There are 3 theological virtues: faith, hope, and charity). The heavenly Jerusalem has 3 gates on each of its four sides. Christians saw 3 as symbolic of the Trinity, the triune nature of God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
And he said unto him, Take me an heifer of three years old, and a she goat of three years old, and a ram of three years old, and a turtledove, and a young pigeon. KJV
KJV
34 And she conceived again, and bare a son; and said, Now this time will my husband be joined unto me, because I have born him three sons: therefore was his name called Levi.
35 And she conceived again, and bare a son: and she said, Now will I praise the Lord: therefore she called his name Judah; and left bearing.
KJV
14 Three times thou shalt keep a feast unto me in the year.
15 Thou shalt keep the feast of unleavened bread: (thou shalt eat unleavened bread seven days, as I commanded thee, in the time appointed of the month Abib; for in it thou camest out from Egypt: and none shall appear before me empty:)
16 And the feast of harvest, the firstfruits of thy labours, which thou hast sown in the field: and the feast of ingathering, which is in the end of the year, when thou hast gathered in thy labours out of the field.
17 Three times in the year all thy males shall appear before the Lord God. KJV
KJV
7 For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.
8 And there are three that bear witness in earth, the spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one. KJV
KJV

4 But later that same night, this message came to Nathan from the LORD:

5 “Go tell my servant David, ‘This is what the LORD says:

“ ‘ “Are you going to build a house5 for me to inhabit? 6 After all, I haven’t lived in a house since the day I brought up the Israelis from Egypt until now. Instead, I’ve moved around in a tent that served as my6 dwelling place. 7 Wherever I moved among the Israelis, did I ever ask even one tribal leader7 of Israel whom I commanded to shepherd my people Israel, ‘Why haven’t you built me a cedar house?’

8 “ ‘ “Now therefore this is what you are to tell my servant David: ‘This is what the LORD of the Heavenly Armies says: “I took you from the pasture myself—from tending sheep—to become Commander-in-Chief8 over my people, that is, over Israel.

9 “ ‘ “Furthermore, I have remained with you everywhere you have gone, annihilating all your enemies right in front of you. I will make a great reputation9 for you, like the reputation10 of great ones who have lived on11 earth. 10 I will establish a homeland12 for my people—for Israel—planting them so they may live in a secure location where they will never be disturbed anymore. Wicked people13 will no longer afflict them, as happened in the past 11 when I had commanded judges to administer14 my people Israel. I’ll also grant you relief from all your enemies.” ’

“ ‘The LORD also announces to you: “The LORD will himself build a house15 for you. 12 When your life16 is complete and you go to join17 your ancestors, I will raise up your offspring18 after you, who will come forth from your body,19 and I will fortify his kingdom. 13 He will build a Temple dedicated to my Name, and I will make the throne of his kingdom last forever. 14 I will be a father to him, and he will be to me a son who, when he commits iniquity, I will discipline with the rod wielded by armies20 and with wounds inflicted by human beings.21 15 But I’ll never remove my gracious love from him as I did from Saul, whom I removed from your presence. 16 Your dynasty and your kingdom will remain forever in my presence—your throne will be secure forever.” ’ ”

17 Nathan communicated this complete oracle to David with precisely these words.

2 Kings 20:4–6 NRSV
Before Isaiah had gone out of the middle court, the word of the Lord came to him: “Turn back, and say to Hezekiah prince of my people, Thus says the Lord, the God of your ancestor David: I have heard your prayer, I have seen your tears; indeed, I will heal you; on the third day you shall go up to the house of the Lord. I will add fifteen years to your life. I will deliver you and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria; I will defend this city for my own sake and for my servant David’s sake.”
Are you leaving problems or plans
Are you leaving Debts or Deeds
King Hezekiah was one of the greatest kings in the history of Judah. He was born in 740BC and he died in 686BC. He was the king for 29 years. Under his leadership the nation of Judah experienced many great religious reforms. His reign is summarized in . Not only was he a godly king, but there were some amazing miracles associated with the reign of Hezekiah. When the Assyrian king Sennacherib surrounded Jerusalem, Hezekiah prayed and God sent His angel during the night and killed 185,000 Assyrian soldiers, thus saving His people. In our text, Hezekiah falls ill and is told by the Prophet Isaiah that he is going to die,
v. 1. Hezekiah takes the matter to the Lord in prayer...
Except the Lord Build the House
v. 2. God hears him and before Isaiah can even leave the palace, , God answers the prayer and sends Isaiah back to tell the king that he will recover and live another 15 years. Hezekiah asks for proof that God will do this amazing thing and asks the Lord to move the sun backward 10 degrees, or about 20 minutes and God answers this prayer too.
Prayer is the linked between the Prophecy and the Promise
Mix your prayer with praise
Received the word of the Lord but if you failed to give him praise can abort their prophecy.
My praise qualify me for my promotion
My praise qualify me for my next level
My praise qualify me for my breakthrough
My praise qualify me for my next season
4. HEZEKIAH’S ILLNESS (20:1–11)
a. Hezekiah’s petition (20:1–7)
20:1. In those days refers to days of the invasion of Jerusalem by Sennacherib, recorded in 18:13–19:36. God added 15 years to Hezekiah’s life in response to his petition for mercy (20:6). Hezekiah died in 686 B.C. which would place this incident in 701 B.C., the year of Sennacherib’s invasion (cf. ).
Hezekiah’s serious illness (with some kind of boil, v. 7) may or may not have been directly connected with the invasion by Sennacherib. God sent Isaiah to announce to Hezekiah that he would die. The prophet instructed him to prepare for this by setting his house (affairs) in order.
20:2–3. Hezekiah responded to this bad news by praying earnestly to the LORD. The king reminded God of his faithfulness to Him, his wholehearted devotion, and his good behavior as God’s vice-regent. He wept bitterly perhaps because he felt his death would give Sennacherib something to boast about, perhaps because his heir, Manasseh, was still very young, and perhaps because he wanted to continue living and reigning.
20:4–6. The king’s appeal in prayer was effective with God. Before Isaiah had left the palace on his way home the LORD gave him a second message: to return to the king with word announcing a postponement of his death. Hezekiah had behaved like a true son of David in the way he reacted to God’s first message. Hezekiah’s prayer (what he said) and his tears (how he felt about what he said) moved God to heal him. Isaiah announced that in three days the king would be well enough to worship God in the temple. God promised to add 15 years to Hezekiah’s life (from 701 to 686). The Lord also promised to deliver Hezekiah and Jerusalem from Sennacherib’s siege and to defend Jerusalem for His own sake and for David’s sake (cf. 19:34).
20:7. Isaiah then gave Hezekiah a treatment for his illness. The poultice of figs was well known in the ancient world as a means of helping to heal boils and ulcers, but Hezekiah’s physicians had not prescribed it. Some think the remedy was designed to demonstrate God’s supernatural power at work in granting the king’s recovery.
b. Hezekiah’s sign (20:8–11)
20:8. Requesting a sign that God would indeed do what He had promised was common among the Israelites (cf. Jud. 6:17, 36–40; ). God did not object to such a request if the sign were requested to strengthen the faith of the person seeking it. Signs were miracles that signified that what God had said He would indeed do. Perhaps the imminent danger that Hezekiah faced from Sennacherib led him to ask for this sign.
20:9–11. God let the king choose whether the shadow would go forward, as it normally would, or backward. Ahaz’s stairway (v. 11) was evidently a stairway King Ahaz had built. It may have been constructed as a sundial to measure the time of day or it may have simply been a regular staircase used by God on this occasion to provide the sign Hezekiah had requested.
By offering to advance the shadow God undoubtedly intended to advance it faster than was normal since the usual rate would have been no sign at all. Hezekiah requested the most obvious and dramatic alternative: that the sun’s shadow be reversed 10 steps. It is not necessary to insist that God reversed the rotation of the earth to effect this miracle. Some similar miracles were evidently limited in their scope, being local rather than universal (cf. ; ).
Thomas L. Constable, “2 Kings,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 1 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 578–579.
4. HEZEKIAH’S ILLNESS (20:1–11)
a. Hezekiah’s petition (20:1–7)
20:1. In those days refers to days of the invasion of Jerusalem by Sennacherib, recorded in 18:13–19:36. God added 15 years to Hezekiah’s life in response to his petition for mercy (20:6). Hezekiah died in 686 B.C. which would place this incident in 701 B.C., the year of Sennacherib’s invasion (cf. ).
Hezekiah’s serious illness (with some kind of boil, v. 7) may or may not have been directly connected with the invasion by Sennacherib. God sent Isaiah to announce to Hezekiah that he would die. The prophet instructed him to prepare for this by setting his house (affairs) in order.
20:2–3. Hezekiah responded to this bad news by praying earnestly to the LORD. The king reminded God of his faithfulness to Him, his wholehearted devotion, and his good behavior as God’s vice-regent. He wept bitterly perhaps because he felt his death would give Sennacherib something to boast about, perhaps because his heir, Manasseh, was still very young, and perhaps because he wanted to continue living and reigning.
20:4–6. The king’s appeal in prayer was effective with God. Before Isaiah had left the palace on his way home the LORD gave him a second message: to return to the king with word announcing a postponement of his death. Hezekiah had behaved like a true son of David in the way he reacted to God’s first message. Hezekiah’s prayer (what he said) and his tears (how he felt about what he said) moved God to heal him. Isaiah announced that in three days the king would be well enough to worship God in the temple. God promised to add 15 years to Hezekiah’s life (from 701 to 686). The Lord also promised to deliver Hezekiah and Jerusalem from Sennacherib’s siege and to defend Jerusalem for His own sake and for David’s sake (cf. 19:34).
20:7. Isaiah then gave Hezekiah a treatment for his illness. The poultice of figs was well known in the ancient world as a means of helping to heal boils and ulcers, but Hezekiah’s physicians had not prescribed it. Some think the remedy was designed to demonstrate God’s supernatural power at work in granting the king’s recovery.
b. Hezekiah’s sign (20:8–11)
20:8. Requesting a sign that God would indeed do what He had promised was common among the Israelites (cf. Jud. 6:17, 36–40; ). God did not object to such a request if the sign were requested to strengthen the faith of the person seeking it. Signs were miracles that signified that what God had said He would indeed do. Perhaps the imminent danger that Hezekiah faced from Sennacherib led him to ask for this sign.
20:9–11. God let the king choose whether the shadow would go forward, as it normally would, or backward. Ahaz’s stairway (v. 11) was evidently a stairway King Ahaz had built. It may have been constructed as a sundial to measure the time of day or it may have simply been a regular staircase used by God on this occasion to provide the sign Hezekiah had requested.
By offering to advance the shadow God undoubtedly intended to advance it faster than was normal since the usual rate would have been no sign at all. Hezekiah requested the most obvious and dramatic alternative: that the sun’s shadow be reversed 10 steps. It is not necessary to insist that God reversed the rotation of the earth to effect this miracle. Some similar miracles were evidently limited in their scope, being local rather than universal (cf. ; ).
Thomas L. Constable, “2 Kings,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 1 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 578–579.
Prayer is the linked between the Prophecy and the Promise
Mix your prayer with praise
Received the word of the Lord but if you failed to give him praise can abort their prophecy.
My praise qualify me for my promotion
My praise qualify me for my next level
My praise qualify me for my breakthrough
My praise qualify me for my next season
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