Faithlife
Faithlife

Walk It Out

Living Our Faith  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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Our faith must be consistent, as evidenced by a daily walk in Christ.

Notes & Transcripts

Introduction

Introduction

I have a confession to make, I strongly dislike walking. As I have gotten older and gained weight, walking has become much more of a chore. I know that if I walk more I can lose some of this extra weight which will make walking less of a chore. I also know that continuing to move, which includes walking, is important to continued health as I get older. I also know that for walking to be beneficial, it must be done on a nearly daily basis. One short walk each week probably isn’t going to do me much good. For walking to make a difference, I must be consistent. It’s the way we are made.
Ingression: So it is with our faith. For our faith to be truly beneficial in our lives we must be consistent in our application of that faith. It is interesting to me that this manner of speaking about faith in the New Testament is often described by a term that we translate as walk. When we see this term it quite often means more than simply putting one foot in front of the other as a means of locomotion. It entails our way of life. To walk in the New Testament was to express your way of living, and it is closely associated with faith.
Inspiration: ;
Ingression: When we read these two passages together we see something significant. We see that faith, as a way of life, is meant to be exercised consistently. So, let’s look a little deeper into the life of Enoch, and what it means to walk it out with God.

Enoch

Son of Jared—six generations removed from Adam
Enoch=to train up—to dedicate
Note something about the first six generations
Adam—and he died
Seth—and he died
Enosh—and he died
Kenan—and he died
Mahalalel—and he died
Jared—and he died
Enoch—God took him (he should not see death)
Enoch=to train up—to dedicate
John Claypool, pastor of the Crescent Hill Baptist Church in Louisville, had a little daughter with leukemia. When she went into remission, everybody thought God had healed her. On an Easter Sunday morning she had a recurrence. In his book Tracks of a Fellow Struggler, Claypool says his daughter asked, “Daddy, did you talk to God about my leukemia?”
John Claypool, pastor of the Crescent Hill Baptist Church in Louisville, had a little daughter with leukemia. When she went into remission, everybody thought God had healed her. On an Easter Sunday morning she had a recurrence. In his book Tracks of a Fellow Struggler, Claypool says his daughter asked, “Daddy, did you talk to God about my leukemia?”
He said, “Yes, we’ve been praying for you.”
She asked, “Did you ask him how long the leukemia would last? What did God say?”
What do you say to your daughter when you can’t help her and the heavens are silent? A few hours later, the little girl died. The following Sunday, John Claypool got up to preach. His text was : “Those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.”
“There are three stages of life,” Claypool said. “Sometimes we mount up with wings as an eagle and fly; we’re on top of the world. Sometimes we run, and we don’t grow weary; we just go through the routine. Sometimes the best we can do is to walk and not faint. That’s where I am right now. I need your prayers.”
At the moment that Claypool was at his lowest, he preached probably his most influential sermon. Like Paul, he could say, “For when I am weak, then I am strong” ().
His Walk

His Walk

Craig Brian Larson and Phyllis Ten Elshof, 1001 Illustrations That Connect (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 2008).
Exported from Logos Bible Software, 3:05 PM July 29, 2017.

His Walk

His Walk

His Walk

Walk—consistent manner of life
Daily—300 years, at least
Based upon faith in the Lord
By his faith, Enoch pleased God
Enoch bypassed death
His faith brought him this reward
His faith pleased God
A little girl came home from church one day, and her mother asked her what she had learned that day. The little girl replied, “Well, we learned about Enoch taking a long walk with God. They walked together a long time, they walked a long way.” The little girl’s mother asked her, “Then what happened?” The little girl said, “Well, they had walked so long, so far, that God told Enoch it was closer to God’s home than to Enoch’s, and so God invited him to stay.”

Our Walk

Our life in Christ is often described with this term—walk
Walk=consistent manner of life
Walk properly—
Walk worthy—; ;
Walk in love—
Walk in the light—
Walk in Christ—
Walk according to the Spirit—
Walk by faith—2 Corinthains 5:7
Walk by faith—
This is how we can please the Lord—walk by faith
Walk=consistent manner of life
Believing that God exists—faith
Believing that He rewards those who seek Him—faith
“The only thing that God requires from us is to enjoy life—and love,” said singer Paul Simon in a February 2001 interview with Rolling Stone. “It doesn’t matter if you accomplish anything. You don’t have to do anything but appreciate that you’re alive. And love, that’s the whole point.”
By contrast, the Old Testament prophet Micah wrote, “And what does the LORD require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God” (6:8).
Craig Brian Larson and Phyllis Ten Elshof, 1001 Illustrations That Connect (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 2008).
Exported from Logos Bible Software, 3:09 PM July 29, 2017.

A Closing Thought

As a disciple of Jesus Christ my goal ought to be to be consistent in my walk—my manner of life
What I do today ought to be what I do tomorrow as I walk with the Lord
Living my faith means living consistently
What the world sees in me should not change from day to day
What the world hears from me, sees from me on Facebook, etc, ought to remain consistent
If I live differently six days of the week only to look like a Christian on Sunday I am not walking consistently
I am living as a hypocrite
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