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2 Samuel 7

2 Samuel  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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Introduction

Chapters 7-10 form a kind of unit.

And in this unit, we see King David involved in four important activities.

In these four chapters we see King David involved in four important activities: accepting God’s will (chap. 7), fighting God’s battles (chap. 8), sharing God’s kindness (chap. 9), and defending God’s honor (chap. 10). However, these activities were nothing new to David, for even before he was crowned king of all Israel he had served the Lord and the people in these ways. Wearing a crown and sitting on a throne didn’t change David, for in his character and conduct he had lived like a king all his young life. How tragic that from chapter 11 on, we see David disobeying the Lord and suffering the painful consequences of his sins. Andrew Bonar was correct when he said, “We must be as watchful after the victory as before the battle.”
In chapter 7, we see him accepting God’s will.
In chapter 8, we see him engaged in righteous battles.
In chapter 9, we see him sharing God’s kindness.
And finally, in chapter 10, we see him defending the truth.
But all these things probably sound familiar … hasn’t David already done these things?
Yes, these actions were nothing new to David.
Even before he was crowned king of Israel he had served the Lord and the people of God in all these ways.
Receiving the crown and the throne did not yet change David … in truth, he had been anointed since his young days and his conduct had excelled that of the king of Israel, Saul, most of his life.
This then amplifies the turn of chapter 11, when we see David disobeying the Lord and suffering the painful consequences of his sins.
Andrew Bonar of the Free Church of Scotland well observed, “We must be as watchful after the victory as before the battle.”
Yet many Christians enter the victory won by Christ and then lay down the weapons of their warfare.
speaks of the armor and the weapons that God has given us.
We can only stand strong in the Lord’s power, it is God’s armor that protects us, and our battle is ultimately against spiritual forces of evil in the world.
If you want to know more about these things, then I’d advise you to go to and do some personal study.
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In our chapter for tonight, David desires to build a temple to house the ark of the covenant.

David desires to build a temple to house the ark of the covenant (7:1–2). God speaks to Nathan the prophet, rejecting David’s plan (vv. 3–7). But in the kind of wordplay the Hebrew people love, God promises to build David’s “house”—not a residence, but his family line (vv. 8–16). God promises that David’s son will succeed him and he will build the temple/house David yearns to provide (v. 12). Then, in a statement that echoes throughout all time, God promises to maintain David’s house/line forever. God will discipline kings in that line who do wrong. But there will come a time when David’s throne is “established forever.” This great promise, the Davidic Covenant, is echoed by the prophets, and is fulfilled in Jesus Christ, David’s Descendant and Lord of an eternal kingdom.

However, God speaks to Nathan the prophet, rejecting David’s plan.

David was capable of building the Temple.
David desires to build a temple to house the ark of the covenant (7:1–2). God speaks to Nathan the prophet, rejecting David’s plan (vv. 3–7). But in the kind of wordplay the Hebrew people love, God promises to build David’s “house”—not a residence, but his family line (vv. 8–16). God promises that David’s son will succeed him and he will build the temple/house David yearns to provide (v. 12). Then, in a statement that echoes throughout all time, God promises to maintain David’s house/line forever. God will discipline kings in that line who do wrong. But there will come a time when David’s throne is “established forever.” This great promise, the Davidic Covenant, is echoed by the prophets, and is fulfilled in Jesus Christ, David’s Descendant and Lord of an eternal kingdom.
He was pulling Israel together, and having a centrally located Temple would have been a boon to that.
He had a supplier from afar in King Hiram of Tyre, who had supplied materials and skilled workman to build David’s palace.
And, David’s intentions were good.
It must have been difficult then for him to hear from Nathan that God would not be following David’s plan.
But God had His own plan.
And His plan was superior to David’s plan … and, David and all mankind would benefit from God’s plan.
God would build David a house.
Only, David already had a palace … chapter 5 described the building of David’s palace in Jerusalem.
Chapter 5 also described the large family David had to occupy that house.

But the scriptures here are using word play.

By house, God was not referring to a residence, but rather to the fulfillment of his line … for God would bring the Messiah through David’s line.
David’s immediate son, Solomon would be a great king … he would build the temple that David wanted to build for the Lord.
And there would be many kings to come through David’s line.
God would discipline kings in his line who do wrong.
But there will come a time when David’s throne is “established forever.”
But there will come a time when David’s throne is “established forever.” This great promise, the Davidic Covenant, is echoed by the prophets, and is fulfilled in Jesus Christ, David’s Descendant and Lord of an eternal kingdom.
This great promise, the Davidic Covenant, is echoed by the prophets, and is fulfilled in Jesus Christ, David’s Descendant and Lord of an eternal kingdom.
And in response, David goes to his knees and praises God, expressing faith in God as Sovereign Lord, and praying that the Lord will do as He has said.
So, that’s where we’re headed in this chapter.
Let’s go to the Lord in prayer and then dig in.
Prayer: Heavenly Father, we thank You for everyone here this evening. Thank You that You know each of us by name and have caused us to walk with You. Lord, we open up Your word desiring to hear from You ... not man's word or wisdom, but Your Words and Wisdom. Please soften our hearts to receive from You.

v1-3

Much of history records wars and battles.

In fact, much preserved ancient writing comes from monuments, steles, pottery, metals, and rocks which have writing on them describing military conquests.

In our own study of scripture, much of it describes skirmishes, battles, and wars.
So then, we might get the impression that war in that time was an everyday thing.
But as anyone who watches the news knows … history has a way of recording the eye catching stuff and downplaying the normative stuff.
The truth is that, yes, life in ancient days was dangerous and territory had to be defended.
But it was not a part of daily routine.
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In chapter 7 we find David in a period of time when he’s not at war … so, what was there to do?

Today, when they aren’t tweeting, presidents seem to play a lot of golf.
In the ancient world, what did kings do when they had no wars to fight?
In , Nebuchadnezzar used down time to survey his city.
He boasted, “Is not this great Babylon, that I have built?” ().
Do not read below:
Daniel 4:30 NKJV
The king spoke, saying, “Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for a royal dwelling by my mighty power and for the honor of my majesty?”
God responded to Nebuchadnezzer by rescinding his royal authority and exiling him from his kingdom, into the fields to live like an animal.
Solomon collected wealth and wives.
He entertained foreign guests, and wrote books.
Hezekiah supervised scholars who copied and preserved the Scriptures ().
In face, we know from that he played a role in preserving the writings of Solomon:
Proverbs 25:1 NKJV
These also are proverbs of Solomon which the men of Hezekiah king of Judah copied:
And it appears from that David’s in his leisure time, thought about the Lord and conferred with his chaplain Nathan about how to bless the Lord and the people of God.
This reminds us that David wasn’t simply a ruler.
He was also a shepherd with a heart concern for his people.
In his rest, he thought of God and His goodness to him.
And he wanted to do something to express thanksgiving to God.
We should pause a moment to remember that our salvation is a work of God and has absolutely nothing to do with any work we do.
Jesus has won the salvation of all who are His.
We neither win nor maintain that salvation with anything we do or do not do.
Sinners are justified (that is declared right) with the Creator God by grace alone (sola gratia), through faith alone (sola fide), on the basis of Scripture alone (sola scriptura).
sinners are justified (declared right) with the Creator God by grace alone (sola gratia), through faith alone (sola fide), on the basis of Scripture alone (sola scriptura).
So, in one way we might look at this chapter as God saying to David … this is my work and not yours.
David wanted to build a house for the LORD, but instead the Lord will covenant with David to establish an everlasting house.
But that would not be at the hands of David, but the work of God alone.
In another way we might look at this chapter as God’s thoughts not being our thoughts and His ways not our ways (
Isaiah 55:8–9 NKJV
“For My thoughts are not your thoughts, Nor are your ways My ways,” says the Lord. “For as the heavens are higher than the earth, So are My ways higher than your ways, And My thoughts than your thoughts.

God is the authority in every area.

And sometimes that means yes and sometimes no … and because we so often want our own way, it can be hard for us to yield to the Lord.
David had plenty of reasons to build the Temple … some very “spiritual reasons.”
How would he respond when God says, “No?”
We’ll find out.
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In this chapter, the Lord reveals to Nathan and David what we would call the “Davidic Covenant.”

This declaration of God had great meaning for David in his day.

But it has significance today for Israel, the church, and for all the world.
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The fact that David wanted to build a house for the Lord isn’t a surprise to us even though the Tabernacle, which God had given instructions for was still in use.

David desired to honor the Lord.

And during his years of exile, David had vowed to the Lord that he would build Him a temple.
David said in
Psalm 132:1–5 NKJV
Lord, remember David And all his afflictions; How he swore to the Lord, And vowed to the Mighty One of Jacob: “Surely I will not go into the chamber of my house, Or go up to the comfort of my bed; I will not give sleep to my eyes Or slumber to my eyelids, Until I find a place for the Lord, A dwelling place for the Mighty One of Jacob.”
In his mind, bringing the Ark to Jerusalem was the first step toward fulfilling that vow.
But notice that his vow said, “I will not go into the chamber of my house, or go up to the comfort of my bed … until I find a place for the Lord.”
Yet David had a palace and had not even started planning for the temple.
David says in verse 2, “See now, I dwell in a house of cedar, but the ark of God dwells inside tent curtains.”
Do not read below:
2 Samuel 7:2 NKJV
that the king said to Nathan the prophet, “See now, I dwell in a house of cedar, but the ark of God dwells inside tent curtains.”
2 Samuel
It troubled David that he was living in a comfortable stone house with cedar paneling while God’s throne was in a tent.
And this is a great example of why it is that God made a one-sided covenant with Abraham that was all God and none of man.
The Abrahamic Covenant of and is an unconditional covenant.
God made promises to Abraham that required nothing of Abraham, involving land, descendants, and blessing and redemption.
These promises were one-sided … God would perform them.
And he believed the LORD, and he counted it to him as righteousness.
In the covenant ceremony of , it was God alone who passed through the pieces … it was a one-sided unconditional covenant.
God would perform it.
That is important because it is very difficult for us to keep up our end of any vow we make towards God.
Things don’t work out as we expected or our sin nature leads us to neglect our promise.

The Davidic Covenant is another one-sided covenant which reaffirmed God’s promise of land (as in the Abrahamic and Mosaic Covenants).

It also promised David’s son would succeed him as king and would build the temple.
AND it promised that the Messiah would come through the line of David.
These were all things in God’s authority and not in David’s to perform.
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Look back to that phrase, “and the Lord had given him rest from all his enemies all around.”

This is taken word for word from .

Do not read below:
Deuteronomy 12:10 NKJV
But when you cross over the Jordan and dwell in the land which the Lord your God is giving you to inherit, and He gives you rest from all your enemies round about, so that you dwell in safety,
In , the promise is made that the land will belong to the twelve tribes ...
is taken word for word from , where the promise is made that the land will belong to the twelve tribes, who will overcome their enemies and be shown one place where worship is to be made.
… that they will overcome their enemies and be shown one place where worship is to be made.
We can surmise then that this promise has been partially fulfilled.
This is the first appearance of Nathan in Scripture. Gad had been David’s prophet during his exile (), and after David’s coronation, Gad didn’t pass from the scene (). In fact, he and Nathan worked together keeping the official records (, ) and organizing the worship (), but Nathan seems to have been the prophetic voice of God to David during his reign. It was Nathan who confronted David about his sin (chap. 12) and also who saw to it that Solomon was crowned king (). David had four sons by Bathsheba and named one of them Nathan (). When Nathan told David to do what was in his heart, he wasn’t affirming that David’s desires were actually God’s will. Rather, he was encouraging the king to pursue his desires and see what the Lord wanted him to do. God answered by giving Nathan a special message for the king, and Nathan faithfully delivered it.
This is the first appearance of Nathan in Scripture. Gad had been David’s prophet during his exile (), and after David’s coronation, Gad didn’t pass from the scene (). In fact, he and Nathan worked together keeping the official records (, ) and organizing the worship (), but Nathan seems to have been the prophetic voice of God to David during his reign. It was Nathan who confronted David about his sin (chap. 12) and also who saw to it that Solomon was crowned king (). David had four sons by Bathsheba and named one of them Nathan (). When Nathan told David to do what was in his heart, he wasn’t affirming that David’s desires were actually God’s will. Rather, he was encouraging the king to pursue his desires and see what the Lord wanted him to do. God answered by giving Nathan a special message for the king, and Nathan faithfully delivered it.
And David wanted to give glory to God by building the Temple in which to house the ark … in the style of a permanent dwelling.
But God had seen to it that some of the promise was fulfilled and God would be the One to see to the remaining fulfillment.
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Now, let’s note that this is the first appearance of Nathan in Scripture.

This is the first appearance of Nathan in Scripture. Gad had been David’s prophet during his exile (), and after David’s coronation, Gad didn’t pass from the scene (). In fact, he and Nathan worked together keeping the official records (, ) and organizing the worship (), but Nathan seems to have been the prophetic voice of God to David during his reign. It was Nathan who confronted David about his sin (chap. 12) and also who saw to it that Solomon was crowned king (). David had four sons by Bathsheba and named one of them Nathan (). When Nathan told David to do what was in his heart, he wasn’t affirming that David’s desires were actually God’s will. Rather, he was encouraging the king to pursue his desires and see what the Lord wanted him to do. God answered by giving Nathan a special message for the king, and Nathan faithfully delivered it.

When David had been in hiding from Saul, Gad had been David’s prophet.

So, what happened to Gad?
Well, after David’s coronation, Gad and Nathan worked together in several ways.
records them keeping the official records and records them organizing the worship.
But it seems that Nathan was the prophetic voice of God to David once he was anointed king.
In fact, he and Nathan worked together keeping the official records (, ) and organizing the worship (), but Nathan seems to have been the prophetic voice of God to David during his reign. It was Nathan who confronted David about his sin (chap. 12) and also who saw to it that Solomon was crowned king (). David had four sons by Bathsheba and named one of them Nathan (). When Nathan told David to do what was in his heart, he wasn’t affirming that David’s desires were actually God’s will. Rather, he was encouraging the king to pursue his desires and see what the Lord wanted him to do. God answered by giving Nathan a special message for the king, and Nathan faithfully delivered it.
And Nathan would be a very important figure in David’s life.
It was Nathan who confronted David about his sin of stealing Uriah’s wife.
And later it was also Nathan in who saw to it that Solomon was crowned king.
So important to David was Nathan that tells us that David named one of his 4 sons by Bathsheba after him.
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Now, David insinuates to Nathan that he desires to build a house for the Lord.

And we know that in the next verses, God will deny David’s desire.

But what does Nathan answer David?
He says, “Go, do all that is in your heart, for the Lord is with you.”
Well, a couple of things here.
First, Nathan was not wrong … the LORD was with David, and what David wanted to do seemed to be the spiritual thing to do.
Secondly, God had not spoken to Nathan yet about this.
When Nathan told David to do what was in his heart, he wasn’t affirming that David’s desires were actually God’s will.
Rather, he was encouraging the king to pursue his desires and see what the Lord wanted him to do.
Sometimes, steps of faith are like that.
You step out and then discover that something is not God’s will and so you step back.
Other times, you find that God is in it and you press forward.
But keep in mind that God being in something doesn’t mean that He rains down funds and blessings.
In fact, many times it’s the battles that clue you in that God is in it … when God is in something, the world hates it and Satan comes against it.
In fact, as we will see in a moment … God may say “no” to something you wanted to do to please Him, and yet be pleased that the desire was in your heart.
And when we do have to turn back from what we thought was a step of faith we can take joy in that God is guiding us.
The Presbyterian Pastor A. T. Pierson said, “Disappointments are His appointments.”

v4-9

That night, the LORD came to Nathan to give a word for David.

Nathan faithfully delivered it.

In His message, God raises a rhetorical question … that is a question that makes a point.
The Lord now takes the initiative by giving his word to Nathan for David. First he raises the question whether a house to dwell in is either necessary or appropriate for the Lord who had been guiding his people and so manifesting his presence in Egypt, and in every part of their journeying. A movable tent had therefore been a more meaningful symbol of his dwelling among them than a permanent building could ever have been. Moreover, no divine command had ever been issued that a house of cedar should be built. All the materials for ‘a desirable residence’ were, after all, part of the Lord’s creation, and there is gentle irony in both the questions contained in these verses.
The Lord had been guided his people and manifested his presence in Egypt, and in every part of Israel’s journey.
Had he ever asked any tribe or tribal leader to build Him a house?
God had commanded Moses to make a tabernacle for His dwelling, and He had been satisfied to travel with His people and dwell with them wherever they camped.
That Tabernacle had been a more meaningful symbol of His dwelling among them than a permanent building could ever have been.
Because no matter where they went, God was there with them.
No, He wasn’t confined to the Tabernacle or to hover above the Ark.
The Tabernacle was a symbol of His presence and at times when it was set up, God would meet with Moses and others at the tent.
Rather, he was encouraging the king to pursue his desires and see what the Lord wanted him to do.
But God also communicated outside of the setting of the Tabernacle.
God also reminds them that no command had ever been issued that a house of cedar should be built.
All the materials for ‘a desirable residence’ were, after all, part of the Lord’s creation, and there is gentle irony in both the questions contained in these verses.
Now that Israel was in the land and had peace, they needed a caring leader, not a temple, and that’s why God called David to shepherd the people of Israel.
God answered by giving Nathan a special message for the king, and Nathan faithfully delivered it.
Now that Israel was in the land and had peace, they needed a caring leader, not a temple, and that’s why God called David to shepherd the people of Israel. God had been with David to protect his life and prosper his service and had made David’s name great. In spite of his desires and his oath, David would not build the temple. The best thing he could do for the Lord was to continue shepherding the people and setting a godly example.
God answered by giving Nathan a special message for the king, and Nathan faithfully delivered it.
In the first part of the message, God reminded David that at no time had He ever asked any tribe or tribal leader to build Him a house. Now that Israel was in the land and had peace, they needed a caring leader, not a temple, and that’s why God called David to shepherd the people of Israel. God had been with David to protect his life and prosper his service and had made David’s name great. In spite of his desires and his oath, David would not build the temple. The best thing he could do for the Lord was to continue shepherding the people and setting a godly example.
God had been with David to protect his life and prosper his service and had made David’s name great.
For David to build the temple would now insinuate that he was able to pay God back.
So, no, the building of the temple would have to wait and be according to God’s timing.
And in spite of his desires and his vow, David would not build the temple.
The best thing he could do that would bless the Lord was to continue leading the people and setting a godly example.

As king, he was to be a servant to the people of God.

In fact, look back to verse 8.
“My servant David” in verse 8 is a title of honor.
is an honoured title, but at the same time a reminder to David that, though he is king, and surrounded by those who serve him, he too has his servant role in relation to his God. It is worth pondering that it was by ‘servant’ imagery that the role of Jesus was most profoundly foreshadowed in the Old Testament
But at the same time it’s a reminder to David that, though he is king, and there are many who serve under him, he is a servant of God to serve God’s people.
And in this we have another foreshadowing of Christ in David.
Jesus said of Himself, “The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.”
Do not read below:
Matthew 20:28 NKJV
just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.”
It is worth pondering that it was by ‘servant’ imagery that the role of Jesus was most profoundly foreshadowed in the Old Testament
It is worth noting that Christ’s role was profoundly foreshadowed in the Old Testament by ‘servant’ imagery, for instance here in 2 Samuel and .
It is worth pondering that it was by ‘servant’ imagery that the role of Jesus was most profoundly foreshadowed in the Old Testament
Isaiah 42:1 NKJV
“Behold! My Servant whom I uphold, My Elect One in whom My soul delights! I have put My Spirit upon Him; He will bring forth justice to the Gentiles.
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This announcement must have disappointed David.

He had his heart set on it and thought it would be a great and pleasing thing to the LORD.

But he accepted God’s Word graciously and gave the Lord thanks for all His goodness to him.
We shouldn’t read God’s response to David’s desire as a rebuke … it’s just instruction.
In fact, later in 1 Kings, when Solomon dedicated the temple, he explained that God was pleased with David’s desire to build the Temple.
Solomon quotes the LORD as saying to David, “Whereas it was in your heart to build a temple for My name, you did well that it was in your heart.”
Do not read below:
1 Kings 8:18 NKJV
But the Lord said to my father David, ‘Whereas it was in your heart to build a temple for My name, you did well that it was in your heart.

v10-17

God’s servants must learn to accept the disappointments of life, for as A. T. Pierson used to say, “Disappointments are His appointments.”

As we spoke about earlier, God’s covenant with Abraham was the foundation for His purposes and dealings with Israel.

God chose Abraham by His grace.
He promised him a land, a great name, multiplied descendants, and His blessing and protection.
He also promised that the whole world would be blessed through Abraham’s seed … which refers to Jesus Christ.

God called Israel to be the conduit through which His Son and His Word would come to the world.

And then God’s covenant with David built on that covenant with Abraham.
It also speaks about the nation, the land, and the Messiah.
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With verse 10, the Lord began with the subject of Israel’s land and promised “rest” to His people.

The Lord began with the subject of Israel’s land (v. 10) and promised “rest” to His people.

In the NKJV it’s “move no more” and in the NIV it’s “no longer be disturbed.”

It’s the Hebrew word רגז Rgz (rah-GAHZ) and in this case means “to be agitated or caused to move.”
In verse 11, we have “rest” which is the Hebrew word נוח Nuach which means “to stay settled.”
I really enjoy seeing how God will sometimes line up our Sunday services with our mid-weeks.
This is one of those cases.
In the author began to address the promised “rests” of God and will continue to do so into chapter 4.

The word “rest” is an important word in the prophetic vocabulary and refers to a number of blessings in the plan of God for His people.

The concept of “rest” began with God’s rest when He completed creation in .
Genesis 2:1–3 NKJV
Thus the heavens and the earth, and all the host of them, were finished. And on the seventh day God ended His work which He had done, and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had done. Then God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it, because in it He rested from all His work which God had created and made.
Genesis 2:1
This was a basis for Israel’s observance of the Sabbath.
This was a basis for Israel’s observance of the Sabbath (). After God delivered Israel from Egypt, He promised them “rest” in their own land (; ; , ). David was so busy fighting wars that he couldn’t build the temple (), but when God gave rest to Israel, Solomon built the temple using the plans and materials that God gave his father David (; ; ).
Later, fter God delivered Israel from Egypt, He promised them “rest” in their own land.
Exodus 33:14 NKJV
And He said, “My Presence will go with you, and I will give you rest.”
Deuteronomy 25:19 NKJV
Therefore it shall be, when the Lord your God has given you rest from your enemies all around, in the land which the Lord your God is giving you to possess as an inheritance, that you will blot out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven. You shall not forget.
Joshua 1:13 NKJV
“Remember the word which Moses the servant of the Lord commanded you, saying, ‘The Lord your God is giving you rest and is giving you this land.’
Joshua 1:13 NKJV
“Remember the word which Moses the servant of the Lord commanded you, saying, ‘The Lord your God is giving you rest and is giving you this land.’
Joshua 1:15 NKJV
until the Lord has given your brethren rest, as He gave you, and they also have taken possession of the land which the Lord your God is giving them. Then you shall return to the land of your possession and enjoy it, which Moses the Lord’s servant gave you on this side of the Jordan toward the sunrise.”

David had periods of rest as we saw at the introduction of this chapter.

But for the most part, David was busy fighting wars.

He was able to assemble the plans and materials for the Temple.
But it wasn’t until the more peaceful reign of Solomon that the temple could be built.
There never was a time when Israel had complete rest and peace in the promised land … and often their lack of rest was associated with their backsliding.
The concept of “rest” goes beyond any of these matters because it speaks also of the spiritual rest that believers have in Christ (; ; ). The concept also looks ahead to Israel’s future kingdom and the rest that God’s people will then enjoy when Jesus Christ sits upon David’s throne (; ; ; ).
But the concept of “rest” goes beyond any of these matters because it speaks also of the spiritual rest that believers have in Christ.
Again, we recognize that our Sunday service in Hebrews spoke of this rest, and Jesus said in Matthew 11:
Matthew 11:28–30 NKJV
Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light.”
Hebrews 2:10–18 NKJV
For it was fitting for Him, for whom are all things and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons to glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For both He who sanctifies and those who are being sanctified are all of one, for which reason He is not ashamed to call them brethren, saying: “I will declare Your name to My brethren; In the midst of the assembly I will sing praise to You.” And again: “I will put My trust in Him.” And again: “Here am I and the children whom God has given Me.” Inasmuch then as the children have partaken of flesh and blood, He Himself likewise shared in the same, that through death He might destroy him who had the power of death, that is, the devil, and release those who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. For indeed He does not give aid to angels, but He does give aid to the seed of Abraham. Therefore, in all things He had to be made like His brethren, that He might be a merciful and faithful High Priest in things pertaining to God, to make propitiation for the sins of the people. For in that He Himself has suffered, being tempted, He is able to aid those who are tempted.
Hebrews 4:14–16 NKJV
Seeing then that we have a great High Priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need.
Having been saved by grace apart from works, as Christians we have entered a rest of sorts.
There are still battles, as God is still doing a conforming work with us.
But there will come a day when we are with the LORD and will fully experience the rest that God promises.
In regards to Israel, the idea also looks ahead to Israel’s future kingdom and the rest that God’s people will then enjoy when Jesus Christ sits upon David’s throne.
The concept also looks ahead to Israel’s future kingdom and the rest that God’s people will then enjoy when Jesus Christ sits upon David’s throne (; ; ; ).
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In the final part of verse 11 the LORD turned to promises concerning David’s throne and family.

It’s normal for a king to be concerned about the future of his kingdom.

But the Lord promised David something above and beyond anything he could have imagined.
David wanted to build God a house (the temple), but God promised to build David a house—a dynasty forever!
The word “house” is used 15 times in this chapter.
It refers to David’s palace, the temple, David’s dynasty, culminating in Messiah, Jesus Christ and even the household of faith.

Here, it’s David’s dynasty.

David wanted to build God a house (the temple), but God promised to build David a house - a forever dynasty.
God’s first announcement of the coming of the Savior was given in .
There, He told us that the Savior would be a human being.
Genesis 3:15 NKJV
And I will put enmity Between you and the woman, And between your seed and her Seed; He shall bruise your head, And you shall bruise His heel.”
nGenesis 3:15
And then we have which tells us that He would be a Jew who would bless the whole world.
Genesis 12:3 NKJV
I will bless those who bless you, And I will curse him who curses you; And in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.”
tells us that He would be a Jew who would bless the whole world, and that He would come through the tribe of Judah. In this covenant, God announced to David that Messiah would come through his family, and prophesied that He would be born in Bethlehem, the City of David (see ). No wonder the king was so elated when he learned that Messiah would be known as “the Son of David” ()!
Later, revealed that He would come through the tribe of Judah.
Genesis 49:10 NKJV
The scepter shall not depart from Judah, Nor a lawgiver from between his feet, Until Shiloh comes; And to Him shall be the obedience of the people.

Shiloh is an untranslated word meaning “The one to whom belongs.”

In it is a reference to the Messiah.
Prior to Shiloh’s coming, the tribe of Judah would continue to maintain power and strength, which is signified by the scepter.
The scepter was the symbol of authority and rule of law.
This first began with David, who was of the tribe of Judah.
In the time of Jesus’ first incarnation, Rome removed Israel’s right to impose capital punishment.
And there will be a time when the obedience of all people will be to Jesus.
and that He would come through the tribe of Judah. In this covenant, God announced to David that Messiah would come through his family, and prophesied that He would be born in Bethlehem, the City of David (see ). No wonder the king was so elated when he learned that Messiah would be known as “the Son of David” ()!
Back to our chapter, in this covenant, God announced to David that Messiah would come through his family.
And prophesied that He would be born in Bethlehem, where David was from.
Micah 5:2 NKJV
“But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, Though you are little among the thousands of Judah, Yet out of you shall come forth to Me The One to be Ruler in Israel, Whose goings forth are from of old, From everlasting.”
Matthew 2:6 NKJV
‘But you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, Are not the least among the rulers of Judah; For out of you shall come a Ruler Who will shepherd My people Israel.’ ”
Now, don’t be confused … there is a doubling going on here.
In this section, the Lord speaks about Solomon as well as about the Savior.
In fact, Matthew drew this distinction in chapter 12 of his Gospel.
Matthew 12:42 NKJV
The queen of the South will rise up in the judgment with this generation and condemn it, for she came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon; and indeed a greater than Solomon is here.
The “greater than Solomon” is Jesus.
Solomon would build the temple David longed to build, however, Solomon’s reign would end.
The reign of Messiah, though, would go on forever.
And so also doubled is the first idea of verse 13, “He shall build a house for My name.”
Solomon would build the temple.
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Jesus would build the church … the Household of Faith.
In , Jesus spoke of Peter’s confession that “Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God” by saying:
Matthew 16:18 NKJV
And I also say to you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it.
Peter is the Greek word for “stone” but in reference to the rock upon which Jesus will build His church it is a Greek word that means “Bedrock.”
It is upon Peter’s confession that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the Living God that Jesus did build His church.
And so Jesus fulfilled this promise of the LORD … as verse 13 here says, He built a house for the LORD.
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So, in our text … God covenants with David, that he would have a house forever, a kingdom forever, and a throne forever.

David would have a house forever (vv. 25, 29), a kingdom forever (v. 16), and a throne forever (vv. 13, 16), and would glorify God’s name forever (v. 26).

Later, in verse 26, David adds that God’s name would be glorified forever.

All of this is ultimately and finally fulfilled in Jesus Christ, the Son of David and will be manifested when He returns, establishes the promised kingdom, and sits on David’s throne.
And the spiritual blessings God offered to David are today offered in Jesus Christ to all who will trust Him.
They will be literally fulfilled by Jesus Christ in the future kingdom promised to Israel (; ; ; ; ; ; ; ).
The throne of David ended in 586 b.c. with Zedekiah, the last king of Judah.
But the line of David continued and brought Jesus Christ the Son of God into the world.
traces Jesus’ genealogy from Abraham through David and to Joseph and Luke gives it from Adam through David and to the line of Mary.
As we continue our study and get past David and Solomon, we’ll see a few good kings but a whole bunch of terrible wicked kings.
This record is evidence that the nation of Israel would have perished quickly if God had not been faithful to His covenant with David.
No matter to what depths the kings and people descended, the Lord preserved them.
And in spite of the nation’s sins, God chastened His people, but He did not break His covenant or take His mercy away.
Even in the last century, the nation of Israel, which God had preserved, though they were scattered around the world, was re-established.
And today people of Israel are still being gathered back to the land.
Much of what held Israel together in ancient times and even recent times can be attributed in some part to the Lord working through David.
His temple worked to hold the nation together as well as David’s governmental organization played a role, even when the nation was divided.
Even in the last century, the Psalms of David and the hope of God’s covenants with David helped to keep scattered Israel from being assimilated and disappearing into the population of the world.
Whether they recognized it or not, the Jewish people were heavily indebted to David for their temple, the instruments and songs used in the temple, the organization of the temple ministry, and the protection the nation had from the enemy nations.
In like manner, we today are indebted to David and his godly heritage.
In spite of the nation’s sins, God chastened His people, but He did not break His covenant or take His mercy away (v. 15; 22:51; ; ; , , ).

v18-29

When it says that David went in and sat before the Lord, it likely means that he went into the tent David set up to house the ark.

As Christians, we no longer need an ark or a temple because the Lord is accessible in every place.

That being said we are commanded to congregate together and it is appropriate to do so in a special place and there we offer up prayers and worship together.
We have a church today because God used David’s family to bring the Savior into the world.
And in Christ, there is a future for believing Israel because God gave David a throne forever.
The way that David responded to this great Word from God is a good example for us today.
He humbled himself before the Lord, prayed and worshipped … and at least ten times called himself the servant of God.
How many of us tonight hearing this good news will respond as passionately?
How many Christians today prefer to hear jokes and stories or things that tickle the ears than to hear the straight up Word of God?
And how many Christians will be told in service that they should be working to change the world?
Servants usually stand at attention and wait for orders, but David sat before the Lord. The covenant God gave David was unconditional; all David had to do was accept it and let God work. Like a little child speaking to a loving parent, the king called himself “David” (v. 20), and he poured out his heart to the Lord.
That’s God’s Work and He will do it with us … probably not in huge ways in everyone’s life … maybe at work or in raising the kids.
These are good works.
The covenant God gave David was unconditional; all David had to do was accept it and let God work.
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So, in our text, like a little child speaking to a loving parent, the king called himself “David,” and he poured out his heart to the Lord.

He recognized and gave praise for the mercies God bestowed on him.
It was God’s grace that had brought David this far.
And now God had spoken about his descendants far into the future.
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In verses 18–22 and 28–29, David addressed God as “Lord God,” which in Hebrew is “YHVH Adonai” meaning “Sovereign Lord.”
In v25, it’s “YHVH Elohim,” the God of power.
In verses 18–20 and 28–29, David addressed God as “Lord God,” which in Hebrew is “Jehovah Adonai, the Sovereign Lord.” (In vv. 22 and 25, it’s “Jehovah Elohim,” the God of power.) Only a God of sovereign grace would give such a covenant, and only a God with sovereign power could fulfill it. “Do you deal with everyone this way, O Sovereign Lord?” (v. 19 nlt). In one sense, the answer is no, because God chose the house of David to bring His Son into the world; but in another sense, the answer is yes, because any sinner can trust Jesus Christ and be saved and enter into the family of God. David saw the promises of this covenant as a “great thing” (v. 21) because of the dependability of God’s Word and God’s love.
Only a God of sovereign grace would give such a covenant, and only a God with sovereign power could fulfill it.
And this is why in verse 21 David calls the promises of this covenant a great thing.
Receiving a promise from someone who has shown themselves to be undependable is not such a great thing.
David asks an interesting question in verse 19
The dependability of God to keep His promises, however makes this a great thing.
It’s great because of the dependability of God’s Word and God’s love.
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So, in closing, the thrust of this prayer is that God gave the Word, David believed it, and David asked God to fulfill that Word for His people.

He wanted Israel to continue as a nation and the Lord to be magnified through Israel.

The third part of David’s prayer and praise (vv. 25–29) looked to the future as revealed in the covenant just delivered to the king. God gave the Word, David believed it, and David asked God to fulfill that Word for His people. He wanted Israel to continue as a nation and the Lord to be magnified through Israel. He asked that his house be built just as the Lord had promised (v. 27), even though it was disappointing to David that he wasn’t permitted to build a house for the Lord. “Thy kingdom come” is the thrust of verse 27, and “Thy will be done” the thrust of verse 28. It was enough for David simply to hear the promises and believe them; he also prayed to the Lord to fulfill them.
He asked that his house be built just as the Lord had promised, even though it was disappointing to David that he wasn’t permitted to build a house for the Lord.
This was very much a “Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done” kind of prayer.
David thought he had the plan, but God showed him that His plan was far better.
All that was left for David was to abide in what God had declared.
“Thy kingdom come” is the thrust of verse 27, and “Thy will be done” the thrust of verse 28. It was enough for David simply to hear the promises and believe them; he also prayed to the Lord to fulfill them.
And in his humility, faith, and submission to God’s will, David is a good example for us to follow.
Wiersbe, W. W. (2002). Be restored (pp. 46–53). Colorado Springs, CO: Victor.
Prayer: Lord Father we thank You for this time we’ve had together studying Your Word and we ask that You would make it fertile in our lives to do what You desire. Thank You for loving us so much and may Your desires be the desires of our hearts. We thank You for the abundance of Your mercies. You are faithful. Help us to submit to You in all things; in humility and in faith.
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