Faithlife
Faithlife

Ruth Part 3

Ruth  •  Sermon  •  Submitted   •  Presented   •  45:57
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Introduction

Recap: A man from Israel, Elimelek, moves his family to Moab during a time of famine. He and his two sons die leaving his wife Naomi and her two daughter-in-laws. Naomi and Ruth return to Jerusalem in despair and meet Boaz who takes notice of Ruth and shows her great kindness.
In this we’ve seen 1) God uses suffering for our good 2) God actually delights in bringing us to ultimate joy.
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So I don’t know about you guys, but things get a twist here.
Illustration: Twighlight Zone — “Eye of the Beholder”
In this chapter we see Ruth do something remarkable—we see in her the power of love. And in this we are going to see some important truths regarding our relationsip with God.

Main Idea: In , we are given a picture of genuine, true, life-transforming love.

1. Love Requires Risk

Ruth had to take a huge risk here.
Paint picture of the scenario—Naomi’s plan—Ruth’s followthrough
Three words in Hebrew right here that are all filled with sexual overtones. Uncover, feet or legs, and lie down. That’s not something you do with just anybody, any day.
What is Naomi up to? What is Naomi telling Ruth to do?
The effect of these words in the original language of the Old Testament is to send the hearers’ minds just racing. Uncover his legs? Lie down? And this is what she’s supposed to do? This is what a Moabite worker in the field is supposed to do to the Israelite owner of the field?
Illustration: This is like finding and reading your mom’s romance novel.
One pastor likened this to telling your daughter to go camping with a boy she likes, wait until he gets drunk and sleepy, uncover his feet so he will wake up, and when he does say, “Tell me what to do.”
But beyond the enuindo here: there are so many things here that were risky
Women didn’t propose to men—Marriages were brokered by the father’s o women. (this is likely why Boaz hasn’t made a move)
A younger woman wouldn’t pursue an older man.
A widow wouln’t have proposed to a wealthy landowner.
Her actions would have most certainly been seen as scandalous and could have cost Boaz everything and even her life.
So this was an enormous risk.
Personally I think the author of Ruth is using these sexual overtones not to suggest there was something sexual actually going on here but rather to press the scandalous nature of what Ruth had set out to do.
Love is always a risk though.
There is no safe investment. To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements; lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket—safe, dark, motionless, airless—it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. The alternative to tragedy, or at least to the risk of tragedy, is damnation. The only place outside of heaven where you can be perfectly safe from all the dangers and perturbations of love is hell.
Ruth's risk wasn't entirely blind.
Ruth's risk wasn't entirely blind.
Boaz has shown that he is faithful, kind, and generous.
So while it was a risk, they were judging Boaz’s character on what they knew.

2. Love Chooses Over Others

Genuine love is willing to forsake others for the sake of the one loved. This is the point of marriage. Boaz was moved because Ruth had chosen him!
Illustration: I am still blown away that Amanda chose to marry my and still chooses to stay with me ... and let me tell you that's tough.
Back up and look at where Ruth’s journey has taken her.
Naomi and her two daughter-in-laws are left destitute now that their husbands are dead, and so Naomi challeges them to return to their families to
The young Moabite widow discards cultural protocol, her own hopes of happiness, and even plain reason when she embraces Naomi’s terrifying God and binds herself for life to her mother-in-law.

3. Love is at the heart of faith

All of this point to our relationship with God.
Faith is ultimately an expression of love and trust. And in Ruth we see an amazing picture of love and trust.
But love and trust require risk and sacrifice/loss.
Risk: Trusting that God is good … even if it’s not totally clear
Sacrifice: forsaking what could otherwise be gained
et’s back up and look at where Ruth’s journey has taken her.
Naomi and her two daughter-in-laws are left destitute now that their husbands are dead, and so Naomi challeges them to return to their families to
Naomi and her two daughter-in-laws are left destitute now that their husbands are dead, and so Naomi challeges them to return to their families to
The young Moabite widow discards cultural protocol, her own hopes of happiness, and even plain reason when she embraces Naomi’s terrifying God and binds herself for life to her mother-in-law.
, ,
We are called by God to risk missing out on the world's joys for ultimate joy in him.

Conclusion

Jesus too the greatest rick and sacrificed everything for us.
Therefore we should be willing to do the same in return.
Believer:
Unbeliever:
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