Faithlife
Faithlife

Jesus:The Author and Finisher of Our Faith: Enduring Suffering

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Introduction:

The Hebrew Writer seeks to present the superiority of Christ from various perspectives. He is better prophet. He is better than the angels. He is better than Moses. He is better than the High Priesthood of Aaron becoming a High Priest after the order of Melchisedek. Today we look at Jesus from a practical perspective of being the Author and Finisher of our faith.

I. Contextual Consideration:

In through there is a clear intentionality to move from the theological implications of the Hebrew letter to a practical application of calling Christians to manifested faithfulness. Since you know Christ is superior, then your faith must allow you to suffer for his name and cause. Notice two passages that place emphasis on the idea of faithfulness:
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19 Therefore, brethren, since we have confidence to enter the holy place by the blood of Jesus,
20 by a new and living way which He inaugurated for us through the veil, that is, His flesh,
21 and since we have a great priest over the house of God,
22 let us draw near with a sincere heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water.
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35 Therefore, do not throw away your confidence, which has a great reward.
36 For you have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God, you may receive what was promised.
37 For yet in a very little while, He who is coming will come, and will not delay.
38 But My righteous one shall live by faith; And if he shrinks back, My soul has no pleasure in him.
39 But we are not of those who shrink back to destruction, but of those who have faith to the preserving of the soul.
From these passages, the Hebrew writer launches into a dissertation of faith in utilizing examples from the old testament. These form the cloud of Witnesses in . To them we are encouraged that they faced their situations in faith even when it mean their demise ().

II. Evaluating your Reality

While you may not be in danger of going back to Judaism as the recipients of this book, all of us are in danger in returning to our former lives when our faith in Christ and God is challenged.
We must honestly admit our vulnerability to being “drawn away” so that we can make every effort to be “drawn near” as we realize his superiority. (see verse 10:22 above).
Realize that the faithfulness of Christ functions as a pattern for our faithfulness ()

III. Jesus: My Example of Enduring the Experience of Suffering (Hebrews 12:2-3)

A. The recipients of the letter can look backward to past saints who were victorious, but ultimately are to look to Jesus as their perfect example, who is the Author (source) and Finisher (the one who completes) our faith. With this in mind, Jesus is the perfect example of faith that endures.
The term “look” carries the idea of “fixing ones attention on an object”.
We are not to casually look at Jesus, but intently so as to provoke our thinking about how to endure.
B. We are invited to see Jesus within the context of his suffering. Here is what we should notice:
B.
He suffered with a disposition (mindset) of Joy. The situation was not joyful, but recognizing the glory that would follow after the suffering allowed him to suffer with joy. We learn from this to suffer with our mind set on the glory (). Christians must realize whatever the situation, face it with joy knowing that God is at work ()
Jesus endured hostility so that you would not become discouraged when you are called to experience the same. ()
We are to view the suffering of Jesus as a paradigm of not just suffering, but how to suffer.
C. Peter Joins Paul in extending the invitation of knowing how to suffer. (Read
1. Craig Keener states “Like most ancient moralists, the writer uses human models to illustrate his chosen virtue, but his illustration of the virtue of faith is the initiator and fulfiller of faith, who suffered in the hope of future reward, as these readers are to do (10:32–39). (The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament : Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity)
Like most ancient moralists, the writer uses human models to illustrate his chosen virtue, but his climactic illustration of the virtue of faith is the initiator and fulfiller of faith, who suffered in the hope of future reward, as these readers are to do (10:32–39).
2.
illustration of the virtue of faith is the initiator and fulfiller of faith, who suffered in the hope of future reward, as these
Craig S. Keener, The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1993), .
readers are to do (10:32–39). The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity
1. We are to follow in the Lord’s footsteps
2. We must suffer without retaliation
3. We must suffer within our innocence knowing we are being unjustly treated.
4. While we suffer, we are to entrust ourselves to the Lord, and not to our own wisdom.
Conclusion/Discussion
1. How does enduring mistreatment without retaliation advance the cause of Christ?
2. What hope to Christians maintain in their suffering? (,
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