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Communion

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Intro

Unusual Doxology
Sometimes we do thng based on tradition
Exp
.Many times we end up doing things for the wrong reasons• Because no one ever stopped to ask why.• We develop habits and traditions sometimes based on nothing more than false information.• Each Sunday here at Franklin Christian Church we have a time of communion where we partake of the bread and the wine that remind us of Jesus’ sacrifice for our sins.• As I thought about our church and the possibility of new friends worshipping with us,• I thought it would be a good time to explain why we take communion every week here at Franklin. says, “On the first day of the week we came together to break bread.”• Early historians document that the early church observed communion every week.• Smaller groups (House churches) possibly took communion every day,• But the church as a whole took communion every Sunday.• Following that precedent, we also provide communion every week.• We simply want to practice what we see the church in the 1st Century practicing.One of the complaints I hear about taking weekly communion• Is that it becomes too common. (Losses it’s meaning)• If you take communion every week it isn’t as special.• With that in mind, I want us to look at why we take communion.First of all, we take communion because…JESUS STARTED IT• I don’t mean for that to sound like a little kid saying “he started it!”• What I mean is that the origins of communion come from Jesus Himself.In fact, communion is also called “The Lord’s Supper” because of the fact that Jesus started it.Paul writes in1Co 11:23 For I received from the Lord what I also passed on to you: The Lord Jesus, on the night he was betrayed, took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way, after supper he took the cup, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood; do this, whenever you drink it, in remembrance of me.”God, Who created us, knows that we don’t have the greatest memories.• Throughout the entire Bible we see that God was always setting up memorials for His people.• Whenever a significant event would happen, the patriarchs would build an altar.• When the people of Israel crossed the Jordan River they set 12 stones by the river bank to serve as a memorial to that event.• Whenever their children walked by and saw the stones the parents would tell them about God’s miraculous entrance for them into the Promise Land.A significant memorial for the Israelites was Passover.• Passover was a meal celebrated to remember their escape from Egypt.• During the meal they would eat bitter herbs to remind them of their years in slavery.• They would also eat sweet honey to remind them of how good the Lord is.• It was during this celebration that Jesus met with His disciples and started the Lord’s Supper.• Every family would set an additional place setting for the Messiah.• This was a reminder that they were looking for the One coming from God.• It is from this place that scholars believe Jesus took the bread and the cup.• Strong significance.The primary purpose of communion is…A SYMBOLIC REMINDER OF CHRIST’S DEATH• Two times in these verses Jesus said to do this, “In remembrance of Me.”• We have all been frustrated or embarrassed at times by forgetting something.• It is embarrassing when someone knows you by name but you can’t remember his or her name. We need reminders.But it is probably a good thing that we don’t remember everything in vivid detail.• If the memory of a bad accident stayed in our minds perfectly,• we would never get back in a car.• If the memory of failure didn’t fade, we might not be willing to try again.How terrible would it be if the memory of a loved one that died• Didn’t fade a little with time?• We never forget them,• But if some of the immediate pain didn’t leave us the grief would be unbearable.The Lord’s Supper is the most meaningful memorial ever established.• You can see the wisdom of God written all over it.• It is so simple. Any culture can participate.It is vividly symbolic.• The unleavened bread reminds us of Christ’s sinless body.• The juice is blood colored and easily reminds us of the blood shed for our sin.• It is portable. You don’t have to travel to some special cathedral to participate.• It can be observed anywhere.• It is interactive. It is not just something we look at. It is something we do.Communion is so much more than a religious tradition.• It is more than a mid-service snack. It is a memorial.• It’s a picture of remembrance.• It focuses our hearts and minds on Jesus.• For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.Every time we participate in the Lord’s Supper,• It’s a sermon without words about the cross.• Jesus left us with a picture so we would never forget.Another reason we take communion is because it…DEMONSTRATES UNITY OF THE CHURCH• I know a little about cars.• I know the basics like how to put gas in the tank, clean the windshield,• I know a few other more complicated things like brakes, exhaust, suspension• But other than that I am ignorant about what it takes for engines to run.• When I have a serious car problem I know to take it to Ray• Because cars and there repair is his specialty.Here at Franklin, we have many people in our church family• who are experts with technology, experts in construction, experts in music, and experts in production.• We have people with mechanical, athletic, and artistic expertise.• These people are an incredible encouragement to me,• But at the same time there’s that little part of me that feels inferior.It’s not always easy to be around someone who is better at something than you are.• And isn’t it even worse when it seems like a person is better at being a Christian than you?The Lord’s Supper erases all of that.Let’s go back to1Co 11:20 When you come together, it is not the Lord’s Supper you eat, for as you eat, each of you goes ahead without waiting for anybody else. One remains hungry, another gets drunk. Don’t you have homes to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I praise you for this? Certainly not!In the Corinthian culture,• it was common practice to show favoritism at mealtimes.• Those who were higher on the social and economic ladder got to go first,• Sometimes leaving nothing for those who weren’t rich or prestigious.• The Christians at Corinth had allowed this practice to creep into the church.• The haves were jumping ahead of the have-nots.So Paul encourages them in verse 33,1Co 11:33 So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for each other.He instructed them to wait for each other• Because, when it comes to the Lord’s Supper, we’re all on the same level.• Social and economic distinctions disappear. (Elab)• Our spiritual inferiority complexes disappear as well.• Jesus died for each of us because we are all sinners• We are all hopelessly lost except for the grace of God.That’s what we remember at the Lord’s Supper.• A brand new Christian and a believer of 50 years are on the same level at the Lord’s Supper.• It’s level ground at the foot of the cross.In fact, listen to verse 27-291Co 11:27 Therefore, whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of sinning against the body and blood of the Lord. A man ought to examine himself before he eats of the bread and drinks of the cup. For anyone who eats and drinks without recognizing the body of the Lord eats and drinks judgment on himself. Communion requires serious self-examination.Communion forces us to be real with God.• It’ through self-examination that we realize none of us are worthy to take communion.• None of us are perfect.• We are all sinners.• But we are sinners saved by God’s grace.• And because of that grace we are part of Christ’s body, the church.When Paul was talking about recognizing the body of the Lord,• He is referring to it in two ways.• First of all, remember the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross.• This is why we have the emblems. (Bread and the Juice)• But secondly, we are to remember our fellow church members.
"This do in remembrance of me."
Remember what was going on in Corinth?
• They were not considering each others needs.
With these words ringing in our ears, we regularly celebrate communion. As we drink the cup and eat the bread, we reflect on Christ's sacrifice and look forward to his return. Yet communion is more than a memorial. Our continued participation in this powerfully symbolic ceremony molds our thinking and brings to life deeply spiritual truths in very concrete ways. It shapes our identity as a people of God and provides the truly blessed assurance that we have been redeemed by the blood of the Lamb. The "message" of communion is important and deserves our full attention.
• There were divisions in the church.

An Unworthy Manner?

• If you have a problem with someone in the church,
From what has been said, it follows that believers should share communion at every reasonable opportunity. Yet, often believers abstain from sharing in this rich experience. They allow the bread and the cup to pass them by as they sit in guilt and shame, wishing they were more worthy. There was a time when I myself would abstain if I were struggling with some sin. What is it that drives believers from their Lord's table in these spiritually intimate moments? Paul's warning in
1 Corinthians 11:27–32 NIV
So then, whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of sinning against the body and blood of the Lord. Everyone ought to examine themselves before they eat of the bread and drink from the cup. For those who eat and drink without discerning the body of Christ eat and drink judgment on themselves. That is why many among you are weak and sick, and a number of you have fallen asleep. But if we were more discerning with regard to ourselves, we would not come under such judgment. Nevertheless, when we are judged in this way by the Lord, we are being disciplined so that we will not be finally condemned with the world.
What is it that drives believers from their Lord's table in these spiritually intimate moments? This practice stems from Paul's warning in . There Paul tells us to examine ourselves before communing, for "whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of sinning against the body and blood of the Lord" (v. 27, NIV). Participating "in an unworthy manner" brings judgment (vv. 29-31), and none of us wishes to transgress this command. Therefore, we examine ourselves before participating, seeing how well we "measure up." If we feel spiritual enough, we may proceed; if we don't, better "safe than sorry."But is this really Paul's meaning? Was this Jesus' meaning? Consider Jesus' words in :Jesus said to them, "I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in him" (vv. 53-56, NIV).Consider further the fact that Jesus' blood cleanses us from sin. When we are guilty, that is when we need Jesus the most. When we are struggling, that is when we need the help and support of the body. We need to be reminded that we are in a fellowship of brothers and sisters who represent Jesus to us, and we need the strength and assurance provided by the communion celebration. To shrink away from it is to retreat within ourselves and suffer silently.What, then, did Paul mean in 1 Corinthians? Consider the context. The Corinthian believers were abusing the Lord's Supper:When you come together, it is not the Lord's Supper you eat, for as you eat, each of you goes ahead without waiting for anybody else. One remains hungry, another gets drunk. Don't you have homes to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I praise you for this? Certainly not! (vv. 20-22, NIV).The Corinthians' behavior contradicted the whole point of the communion experience. Rather than celebrating their unity, they were revealing their division. Hence Paul's question, "Do you despise the church of God?" They were eating and drinking "without recognizing the body of the Lord" (v. 30), that is, the body of Christ of which they were part. As such, they were eating and drinking "in an unworthy manner" and bringing judgment on themselves. The "unworthy manner" relates to the way they abused the Lord's Supper. This observation is confirmed by verses 33 and 34: "So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for each other. If anyone is hungry, he should eat at home, so that when you meet together it may not result in judgment" (vv. 33,34, NIV).When we struggle with sin and find ourselves in need of forgiveness, let us seek that forgiveness and eagerly reach for the cleansing blood of Christ. "Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ?" (, NIV). Let us share the communion experience and the reassurance that we are part of God's people. "Is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ?" (, NIV). Participation in the Body This message is one of hope and comfort, but it is also one of warning. Paul directs our attention to the body and asks us to examine ourselves. Are we communing as a body? Right relationships within the body are essential. Jesus taught that this aspect of church life is to take precedence over worship (cf. ,).Communion is not an individualistic matter; it is a body matter. We commune as a body; we come to the Lord's table as a family. This truth is bound up in the biblical symbol of the one loaf and the one cup. "Because there is one loaf," Paul writes, "we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf" (, NIV).The New Testament Christians celebrated communion by sharing a single cup and a single loaf of bread as visible signs of their unity (). In this they followed the pattern of Jesus and his disciples at the Last Supper (,). Without this symbol, it is easy to forget the communal nature of this important ceremony.Another key ingredient in the early church's communion experience was the shared meal in which context the loaf and the cup were shared. The Lord's Supper was made up of both the potluck and the emblems, as the context of 1 Corinthians makes cle ar (vv. 20-22,33). In this, too, the Lord's Supper reflected the Last Supper (v. 25). What Paul describes here as the Lord's Supper is described by Peter and Jude as the "agape" or love feast (; ).This meal was the focal point of the church's weekly experience, as indicates: "On the first day of the week" the church at Troas "came together to break bread" (NIV). Similarly, in Paul writes to the Corinthians about "when you come together as a church," adding that they come together to eat the meal (v. 20). The only other passage in 1 Corinthians in which Paul uses this language is 14:26 where, as everyone recognizes, Paul is explicitly describing the church's regular assembly. From this it appears that the early church communed every single week, not monthly, quarterly, or annually, as many churches do today.This body dimension of communion tells us something about the mood of the meal as well. Communion is often taken in a somber mood of dismal introspection as we focus on the death of Christ. But could the proper context be one of celebration? If a shared meal were part of our communion together, it would seem so. We read in Acts that the first Christians "broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts" (). Communion was an occasion of sharing with the saints and celebrating the forgiveness found in Christ. In this, the communion meal was intended as a foreshadowing of the messianic banquet feast described in . This forward-looking aspect is confirmed not only by ("until he comes") but also the account of the Last Supper in ,,. See also ; ; ; and for the theme of the messianic banquet. ConclusionThe next time your church celebrates communion, take a look around the room and consider the brothers and sisters with whom you are communing. Evaluate your relationships with them. Do you despise the church of God? Consider how to put an end to unresolved conflicts. Do you recognize the body of the Lord? If so, commune with thanksgiving. Are you struggling with sin? Drink deeply of the cup of forgiveness, and thank God that Christ is coming soon to usher us in to the banquet hall where we shall celebrate with all the saints in the body.
• you need to work things out with them before you take communion.
Examine Ourselves to ensure we are not
eating or drinking in an unworthy manner
This brings judgment
Problem. When we look at the surface of this we might examine ourselves and if we feel spiritual enough we participate.
What we are remembering
John 6:53–56 NIV
Jesus said to them, “Very truly I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise them up at the last day. For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in them.
John 6:
Jesus' blood cleanses us from sin.
• Otherwise, you are not recognizing the body of the Lord.
Consider further the fact that Jesus' blood cleanses us from sin. When we are guilty, that is when we need Jesus the most. When we are struggling, that is when we need the help and support of the body. We need to be reminded that we are in a fellowship of brothers and sisters who represent Jesus to us, and we need the strength and assurance provided by the communion celebration. To shrink away from it is to retreat within ourselves and suffer silently.What, then, did Paul mean in 1 Corinthians? Consider the context. The Corinthian believers were abusing the Lord's Supper:When you come together, it is not the Lord's Supper you eat, for as you eat, each of you goes ahead without waiting for anybody else. One remains hungry, another gets drunk. Don't you have homes to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I praise you for this? Certainly not! (vv. 20-22, NIV).The Corinthians' behavior contradicted the whole point of the communion experience. Rather than celebrating their unity, they were revealing their division. Hence Paul's question, "Do you despise the church of God?" They were eating and drinking "without recognizing the body of the Lord" (v. 30), that is, the body of Christ of which they were part. As such, they were eating and drinking "in an unworthy manner" and bringing judgment on themselves. The "unworthy manner" relates to the way they abused the Lord's Supper. This observation is confirmed by verses 33 and 34: "So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for each other. If anyone is hungry, he should eat at home, so that when you meet together it may not result in judgment" (vv. 33,34, NIV).When we struggle with sin and find ourselves in need of forgiveness, let us seek that forgiveness and eagerly reach for the cleansing blood of Christ. "Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ?" (, NIV). Let us share the communion experience and the reassurance that we are part of God's people. "Is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ?" (, NIV). Participation in the Body This message is one of hope and comfort, but it is also one of warning. Paul directs our attention to the body and asks us to examine ourselves. Are we communing as a body? Right relationships within the body are essential. Jesus taught that this aspect of church life is to take precedence over worship (cf. ,).Communion is not an individualistic matter; it is a body matter. We commune as a body; we come to the Lord's table as a family. This truth is bound up in the biblical symbol of the one loaf and the one cup. "Because there is one loaf," Paul writes, "we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf" (, NIV).The New Testament Christians celebrated communion by sharing a single cup and a single loaf of bread as visible signs of their unity (). In this they followed the pattern of Jesus and his disciples at the Last Supper (,). Without this symbol, it is easy to forget the communal nature of this important ceremony.Another key ingredient in the early church's communion experience was the shared meal in which context the loaf and the cup were shared. The Lord's Supper was made up of both the potluck and the emblems, as the context of 1 Corinthians makes cle ar (vv. 20-22,33). In this, too, the Lord's Supper reflected the Last Supper (v. 25). What Paul describes here as the Lord's Supper is described by Peter and Jude as the "agape" or love feast (; ).This meal was the focal point of the church's weekly experience, as indicates: "On the first day of the week" the church at Troas "came together to break bread" (NIV). Similarly, in Paul writes to the Corinthians about "when you come together as a church," adding that they come together to eat the meal (v. 20). The only other passage in 1 Corinthians in which Paul uses this language is 14:26 where, as everyone recognizes, Paul is explicitly describing the church's regular assembly. From this it appears that the early church communed every single week, not monthly, quarterly, or annually, as many churches do today.This body dimension of communion tells us something about the mood of the meal as well. Communion is often taken in a somber mood of dismal introspection as we focus on the death of Christ. But could the proper context be one of celebration? If a shared meal were part of our communion together, it would seem so. We read in Acts that the first Christians "broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts" (). Communion was an occasion of sharing with the saints and celebrating the forgiveness found in Christ. In this, the communion meal was intended as a foreshadowing of the messianic banquet feast described in . This forward-looking aspect is confirmed not only by ("until he comes") but also the account of the Last Supper in ,,. See also ; ; ; and for the theme of the messianic banquet. ConclusionThe next time your church celebrates communion, take a look around the room and consider the brothers and sisters with whom you are communing. Evaluate your relationships with them. Do you despise the church of God? Consider how to put an end to unresolved conflicts. Do you recognize the body of the Lord? If so, commune with thanksgiving. Are you struggling with sin? Drink deeply of the cup of forgiveness, and thank God that Christ is coming soon to usher us in to the banquet hall where we shall celebrate with all the saints in the body.
When we are guilty, that is when we need Jesus the most.
When we are struggling, that is when we need the help and support of the body.
We need to be reminded that we are in a fellowship of brothers and sisters who represent
Jesus to us, and we need the strength and assurance provided by the communion celebration.
What Paul Meant
Consider the context.
The Corinthian believers were abusing the Lord's Supper:
1 Corinthians 11:20–22 NIV
So then, when you come together, it is not the Lord’s Supper you eat, for when you are eating, some of you go ahead with your own private suppers. As a result, one person remains hungry and another gets drunk. Don’t you have homes to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God by humiliating those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I praise you? Certainly not in this matter!
1 Co 11:22When you come together, it is not the Lord's Supper you eat, for as you eat, each of you goes ahead without waiting for anybody else. One remains hungry, another gets drunk. Don't you have homes to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I praise you for this? Certainly not! (vv. 20-22, NIV).The Corinthians' behavior contradicted the whole point of the communion experience. Rather than celebrating their unity, they were revealing their division. Hence Paul's question, "Do you despise the church of God?" They were eating and drinking "without recognizing the body of the Lord" (v. 30), that is, the body of Christ of which they were part. As such, they were eating and drinking "in an unworthy manner" and bringing judgment on themselves. The "unworthy manner" relates to the way they abused the Lord's Supper. This observation is confirmed by verses 33 and 34: "So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for each other. If anyone is hungry, he should eat at home, so that when you meet together it may not result in judgment" (vv. 33,34, NIV).When we struggle with sin and find ourselves in need of forgiveness, let us seek that forgiveness and eagerly reach for the cleansing blood of Christ. "Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ?" (, NIV). Let us share the communion experience and the reassurance that we are part of God's people. "Is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ?" (, NIV).
The Corinthians' behavior contradicted the whole point of the communion experience. Rather than celebrating their unity, they were revealing their division.
1 Corinthians 11:30 NIV
That is why many among you are weak and sick, and a number of you have fallen asleep.
Hence Paul's question, "Do you despise the church of God?" They were eating and drinking "without recognizing the body of the Lord" (v. 30), that is, the body of Christ of which they were part. As such, they were eating and drinking "in an unworthy manner" and bringing judgment on themselves. The "unworthy manner" relates to the way they abused the Lord's Supper. This observation is confirmed by verses 33 and 34: "So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for each other. If anyone is hungry, he should eat at home, so that when you meet together it may not result in judgment" (vv. 33,34, NIV).When we struggle with sin and find ourselves in need of forgiveness, let us seek that forgiveness and eagerly reach for the cleansing blood of Christ. "Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ?" (, NIV). Let us share the communion experience and the reassurance that we are part of God's people. "Is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ?" (, NIV).
This is the unworthy manner that brings judgment The "unworthy manner" relates to the way they abused the Lord's Supper.
This observation is confirmed by verses 33 and 34:
1 Corinthians 11:33–34 NIV
So then, my brothers and sisters, when you gather to eat, you should all eat together. Anyone who is hungry should eat something at home, so that when you meet together it may not result in judgment. And when I come I will give further directions.
"So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for each other. If anyone is hungry, he should eat at home, so that when you meet together it may not result in judgment" (vv. 33,34, NIV).When we struggle with sin and find ourselves in need of forgiveness, let us seek that forgiveness and eagerly reach for the cleansing blood of Christ. "Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ?" (, NIV). Let us share the communion experience and the reassurance that we are part of God's people. "Is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ?" (, NIV).
Point
It is not sin that makes us unworthy or we would all be on worthy.
1 Corinthians 10:16 NIV
Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ? And is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ?
"Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ?" (, NIV). Let us share the communion experience and the reassurance that we are part of God's people. "Is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ?" (, NIV).

Participation in the Body

Jesus said in ,
Communion as a body
it’s in the definition -
This message is one of hope and comfort, but it is also one of warning. Paul directs our attention to the body and asks us to examine ourselves. Are we communing as a body? Right relationships within the body are essential. Jesus taught that this aspect of church life is to take precedence over worship (cf. ,).Communion is not an individualistic matter; it is a body matter. We commune as a body; we come to the Lord's table as a family. This truth is bound up in the biblical symbol of the one loaf and the one cup. "Because there is one loaf," Paul writes, "we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf" (, NIV).The New Testament Christians celebrated communion by sharing a single cup and a single loaf of bread as visible signs of their unity (). In this they followed the pattern of Jesus and his disciples at the Last Supper (,). Without this symbol, it is easy to forget the communal nature of this important ceremony.Another key ingredient in the early church's communion experience was the shared meal in which context the loaf and the cup were shared. The Lord's Supper was made up of both the potluck and the emblems, as the context of 1 Corinthians makes cle ar (vv. 20-22,33). In this, too, the Lord's Supper reflected the Last Supper (v. 25). What Paul describes here as the Lord's Supper is described by Peter and Jude as the "agape" or love feast (; ).This meal was the focal point of the church's weekly experience, as indicates: "On the first day of the week" the church at Troas "came together to break bread" (NIV). Similarly, in Paul writes to the Corinthians about "when you come together as a church," adding that they come together to eat the meal (v. 20). The only other passage in 1 Corinthians in which Paul uses this language is 14:26 where, as everyone recognizes, Paul is explicitly describing the church's regular assembly. From this it appears that the early church communed every single week, not monthly, quarterly, or annually, as many churches do today.This body dimension of communion tells us something about the mood of the meal as well. Communion is often taken in a somber mood of dismal introspection as we focus on the death of Christ. But could the proper context be one of celebration? If a shared meal were part of our communion together, it would seem so. We read in Acts that the first Christians "broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts" (). Communion was an occasion of sharing with the saints and celebrating the forgiveness found in Christ. In this, the communion meal was intended as a foreshadowing of the messianic banquet feast described in . This forward-looking aspect is confirmed not only by ("until he comes") but also the account of the Last Supper in ,,. See also ; ; ; and for the theme of the messianic banquet.
the body needs to be in right relationship with each other
Matthew 5:23–25 NIV
“Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift. “Settle matters quickly with your adversary who is taking you to court. Do it while you are still together on the way, or your adversary may hand you over to the judge, and the judge may hand you over to the officer, and you may be thrown into prison.
Matthew 5:23–24 NIV
“Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift.
This message is one of hope and comfort, but it is also one of warning. Paul directs our attention to the body and asks us to examine ourselves. Are we communing as a body? Right relationships within the body are essential. Jesus taught that this aspect of church life is to take precedence over worship (cf. ,).Communion is not an individualistic matter; it is a body matter. We commune as a body; we come to the Lord's table as a family. This truth is bound up in the biblical symbol of the one loaf and the one cup. "Because there is one loaf," Paul writes, "we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf" (, NIV).The New Testament Christians celebrated communion by sharing a single cup and a single loaf of bread as visible signs of their unity (). In this they followed the pattern of Jesus and his disciples at the Last Supper (,). Without this symbol, it is easy to forget the communal nature of this important ceremony.Another key ingredient in the early church's communion experience was the shared meal in which context the loaf and the cup were shared. The Lord's Supper was made up of both the potluck and the emblems, as the context of 1 Corinthians makes cle ar (vv. 20-22,33). In this, too, the Lord's Supper reflected the Last Supper (v. 25). What Paul describes here as the Lord's Supper is described by Peter and Jude as the "agape" or love feast (; ).This meal was the focal point of the church's weekly experience, as indicates: "On the first day of the week" the church at Troas "came together to break bread" (NIV). Similarly, in Paul writes to the Corinthians about "when you come together as a church," adding that they come together to eat the meal (v. 20). The only other passage in 1 Corinthians in which Paul uses this language is 14:26 where, as everyone recognizes, Paul is explicitly describing the church's regular assembly. From this it appears that the early church communed every single week, not monthly, quarterly, or annually, as many churches do today.This body dimension of communion tells us something about the mood of the meal as well. Communion is often taken in a somber mood of dismal introspection as we focus on the death of Christ. But could the proper context be one of celebration? If a shared meal were part of our communion together, it would seem so. We read in Acts that the first Christians "broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts" (). Communion was an occasion of sharing with the saints and celebrating the forgiveness found in Christ. In this, the communion meal was intended as a foreshadowing of the messianic banquet feast described in . This forward-looking aspect is confirmed not only by ("until he comes") but also the account of the Last Supper in ,,. See also ; ; ; and for the theme of the messianic banquet.
This truth is bound up in the biblical symbol of the one loaf and the one cup.
1 Corinthians 10:17 NIV
Because there is one loaf, we, who are many, are one body, for we all share the one loaf.
This message is one of hope and comfort, but it is also one of warning. Paul directs our attention to the body and asks us to examine ourselves. Are we communing as a body? Right relationships within the body are essential. Jesus taught that this aspect of church life is to take precedence over worship (cf. ,).Communion is not an individualistic matter; it is a body matter. We commune as a body; we come to the Lord's table as a family. This truth is bound up in the biblical symbol of the one loaf and the one cup. "Because there is one loaf," Paul writes, "we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf" (, NIV).The New Testament Christians celebrated communion by sharing a single cup and a single loaf of bread as visible signs of their unity (). In this they followed the pattern of Jesus and his disciples at the Last Supper (,). Without this symbol, it is easy to forget the communal nature of this important ceremony.Another key ingredient in the early church's communion experience was the shared meal in which context the loaf and the cup were shared. The Lord's Supper was made up of both the potluck and the emblems, as the context of 1 Corinthians makes cle ar (vv. 20-22,33). In this, too, the Lord's Supper reflected the Last Supper (v. 25). What Paul describes here as the Lord's Supper is described by Peter and Jude as the "agape" or love feast (; ).This meal was the focal point of the church's weekly experience, as indicates: "On the first day of the week" the church at Troas "came together to break bread" (NIV). Similarly, in Paul writes to the Corinthians about "when you come together as a church," adding that they come together to eat the meal (v. 20). The only other passage in 1 Corinthians in which Paul uses this language is 14:26 where, as everyone recognizes, Paul is explicitly describing the church's regular assembly. From this it appears that the early church communed every single week, not monthly, quarterly, or annually, as many churches do today.This body dimension of communion tells us something about the mood of the meal as well. Communion is often taken in a somber mood of dismal introspection as we focus on the death of Christ. But could the proper context be one of celebration? If a shared meal were part of our communion together, it would seem so. We read in Acts that the first Christians "broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts" (). Communion was an occasion of sharing with the saints and celebrating the forgiveness found in Christ. In this, the communion meal was intended as a foreshadowing of the messianic banquet feast described in . This forward-looking aspect is confirmed not only by ("until he comes") but also the account of the Last Supper in ,,. See also ; ; ; and for the theme of the messianic banquet.
1 Co "Because there is one loaf," Paul writes, "we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf" (, NIV).The New Testament Christians celebrated communion by sharing a single cup and a single loaf of bread as visible signs of their unity (). In this they followed the pattern of Jesus and his disciples at the Last Supper (,). Without this symbol, it is easy to forget the communal nature of this important ceremony.Another key ingredient in the early church's communion experience was the shared meal in which context the loaf and the cup were shared. The Lord's Supper was made up of both the potluck and the emblems, as the context of 1 Corinthians makes cle ar (vv. 20-22,33). In this, too, the Lord's Supper reflected the Last Supper (v. 25). What Paul describes here as the Lord's Supper is described by Peter and Jude as the "agape" or love feast (; ).This meal was the focal point of the church's weekly experience, as indicates: "On the first day of the week" the church at Troas "came together to break bread" (NIV). Similarly, in Paul writes to the Corinthians about "when you come together as a church," adding that they come together to eat the meal (v. 20). The only other passage in 1 Corinthians in which Paul uses this language is 14:26 where, as everyone recognizes, Paul is explicitly describing the church's regular assembly. From this it appears that the early church communed every single week, not monthly, quarterly, or annually, as many churches do today.This body dimension of communion tells us something about the mood of the meal as well. Communion is often taken in a somber mood of dismal introspection as we focus on the death of Christ. But could the proper context be one of celebration? If a shared meal were part of our communion together, it would seem so. We read in Acts that the first Christians "broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts" (). Communion was an occasion of sharing with the saints and celebrating the forgiveness found in Christ. In this, the communion meal was intended as a foreshadowing of the messianic banquet feast described in . This forward-looking aspect is confirmed not only by ("until he comes") but also the account of the Last Supper in ,,. See also ; ; ; and for the theme of the messianic banquet.
Follow the Pattern
Mark 14:22–23 NIV
While they were eating, Jesus took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to his disciples, saying, “Take it; this is my body.” Then he took a cup, and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them, and they all drank from it.
2 Peter 2:13 NIV
They will be paid back with harm for the harm they have done. Their idea of pleasure is to carouse in broad daylight. They are blots and blemishes, reveling in their pleasures while they feast with you.
Mark In this they followed the pattern of Jesus and his disciples at the Last Supper (,). Without this symbol, it is easy to forget the communal nature of this important ceremony.Another key ingredient in the early church's communion experience was the shared meal in which context the loaf and the cup were shared. The Lord's Supper was made up of both the potluck and the emblems, as the context of 1 Corinthians makes cle ar (vv. 20-22,33). In this, too, the Lord's Supper reflected the Last Supper (v. 25). What Paul describes here as the Lord's Supper is described by Peter and Jude as the "agape" or love feast (; ).This meal was the focal point of the church's weekly experience, as indicates: "On the first day of the week" the church at Troas "came together to break bread" (NIV). Similarly, in Paul writes to the Corinthians about "when you come together as a church," adding that they come together to eat the meal (v. 20). The only other passage in 1 Corinthians in which Paul uses this language is 14:26 where, as everyone recognizes, Paul is explicitly describing the church's regular assembly. From this it appears that the early church communed every single week, not monthly, quarterly, or annually, as many churches do today.This body dimension of communion tells us something about the mood of the meal as well. Communion is often taken in a somber mood of dismal introspection as we focus on the death of Christ. But could the proper context be one of celebration? If a shared meal were part of our communion together, it would seem so. We read in Acts that the first Christians "broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts" (). Communion was an occasion of sharing with the saints and celebrating the forgiveness found in Christ. In this, the communion meal was intended as a foreshadowing of the messianic banquet feast described in . This forward-looking aspect is confirmed not only by ("until he comes") but also the account of the Last Supper in ,,. See also ; ; ; and for the theme of the messianic banquet.
Jude 12 NIV
These people are blemishes at your love feasts, eating with you without the slightest qualm—shepherds who feed only themselves. They are clouds without rain, blown along by the wind; autumn trees, without fruit and uprooted—twice dead.
Patern of breaking bead
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Other Side Notes
Acts 11:18 NIV
When they heard this, they had no further objections and praised God, saying, “So then, even to Gentiles God has granted repentance that leads to life.”
Procedure - most of this is individual style no cannon
It is a ritual passed on to all disciples so you are all qualified to give it.
Accept for offenses with a brother there is no reason you shouldn’t participate.
“Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you,
leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to your brother; then come and offer your gift.
Let me summarize this by saying
• That in my opinion, there are the times you should not take communion.
• First of all, you shouldn’t take communion if you are not a Christian.
• If you haven’t made Jesus Lord and Savior, then this is a meaningless meal to you.
• Secondly, you shouldn’t take communion if there is someone in your life you haven’t forgiven.
• If you are not truly trying to forgive someone who has wronged you then you need to take care of that first.
• Third, don’t take communion if you are totally distracted or irritated.
• If you’re thinking more about what you have to do this afternoon,
• or if you’re worried about beating the crowd to the restaurant,
• Let the trays pass by.
• We need to focus on the body and the blood of Christ during communion.
• If we are distracted then it is probably time to just let it pass by and take it later.
I love the fact that we have communion every week in our worship service.
• Some people ask why do you want to take it every week?
• I want to ask, why wouldn’t you want to take it every week?
Communion is a time when…I REDEDICATE MYSELF TO CHRIST
• Communion reminds me that He is God, and I am not.
• There is an attitude about God among people today.
• The overall thought among people is that God is my good buddy.
• There was a t-shirt that said, “Jesus is my homeboy.”
Don’t get me wrong: there is the friendship aspect of our relationship with Jesus.
• He is our friend.
• In fact, Jesus called His disciples “friends.” ()
• But first and foremost, He is God.
• There are times when we worship when we just want to jump up and down and shout for joy.
• But there is also a times when we need to be still,
• So quiet that you can hear a pin drop…
• And just sit there and know He is God.
There was a man named Robert Tinsky.
• He was raised in Judaism.
• Dissatisfied spiritually, he visited a Christian Church for the first time, seeking some religious truth.
• He was amazed by the observance of the Lord’s Supper.
• But He didn’t understand it.
• So He asked some young people seated near him what it meant.
• They faithfully told him the gospel story as portrayed in the loaf and cup.
• He was amazed that there was a God who loved humankind enough to give His Son to die for us
• And at the wisdom that originated such a living memorial.
• He became a Christian and a faithful preacher of the gospel.
When we share in Communion
• We are celebrating a relationship with the risen Lord Jesus Christ,• When we take communion we take Jesus’s words seriously that He spoke on the night before he died,• “This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me.” “This cup is the new covenant in my blood; do this, whenever you drink it, in remembrance of me.”INVITATIONA lot of you have probably never heard of Kyle McDonald,• Kyle’s mission was to trade one red paperclip for an entire house.• Before you say, “This guy is nuts,” you should know that he did it , he succeeded.• He started in July a few years ago.• He found someone who would trade in a fish-shaped ink pen for his red paper clip.• From there, he was off and running. He traded the ink pen for a hand-sculpted doorknob.• And he just kept on trading, each time trading up for something bigger and better.• Some of the trades included a Honda generator which he received from a U.S. Marine,• a snowmobile, a large truck, an afternoon with Alice Cooper, a movie role,• until finally, after 43 trades, Kyle traded for a two story farmhouse.• It took Kyle McDonald almost a year exactly to turn one red paper clip into a house.• I think every one of us would say that this was a pretty impressive trade.• But there is an even more incredible trade that is available to each one of us.• Each week, we’re reminded of that trade through the Lord’s Supper.• The Lord’s Supper is a reminder of the horrible death that Jesus died on a cross.• He died for your sins and for mine.• His body was broken and his blood was shed,• not because of His sins, but because of ours.• On the cross, Jesus took all of our mistakes, shortcomings, and sins.• He took the blackest and darkest things we have ever done.• And in return, we are clothed with His perfection and holiness.• And this offer is made to everyone.• We simply need to choose to accept it.• If you’ve never accepted this trade that God offers, we invite you to today.
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