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Who is the Lord of the Supper?

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Hebrews  •  Sermon  •  Submitted   •  Presented   •  18:56
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On this Communion Sunday, Hebrews 1:1-4 serve as a good reminder of who is the Lord of this Supper.

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As we learned last week, the best defense against faith robbing doubt and despair is a clear knowledge of the Supremacy and Sufficiency of Christ. The author of Hebrews waste no time in teaching his readers this. Verses 1-4 serve as an introductory summery of the teaching of the whole book.
As we gather here preparing ourselves to partake of the Lord’s Supper, these verses serve as a good reminder of who the Lord of this Supper is. Let us read from Hebrews 1:1-4 once again.
Hebrews 1:1–4 ESV
Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets, but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world. He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature, and he upholds the universe by the word of his power. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high, having become as much superior to angels as the name he has inherited is more excellent than theirs.
The first thing we learn is, The Lord of the Supper is...

The Only Begotten Son of God

When the author of Hebrews says in verse 2 that God “has spoken to us by his Son,” he is speaking of Jesus as the only begotten Son of God. This is made clear in verse 3 when he writes,
Hebrews 1:3 ESV
He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature, and he upholds the universe by the word of his power. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high,
In speaking of the “radiance of the glory of God” the author of Hebrews is referring to the Shekinah glory cloud that led Israel in the desert and descended upon the Tabernacle and Temple. The author of Hebrews is saying that the Son manifests the same glory as the Father. If this was not enough, the author also says that Jesus as the Son of God is “the exact imprint” of God the Father’s nature. Jesus is not a mere resemblance, He is the “exact imprint” of the Father’s nature. Jesus shares completely in the divine nature of the Father. All that the Father is, the Son is. Jesus himself taught this saying, “Whoever has seen me has seen the Father.” (Jn 14:9)
To reinforce his point, the author of Hebrews reminds us in (Heb 1:2) that the Son was the agent through whom He created the universe. Think of it like this: The Father is the architect who drew up the plans, the Son was the master craftsman who built everything. Not only that, but God the Father has a master plan for His universe and it is the Son through whom He is bring all things to His desired ends. We see this in (Heb 1:3) when we read, “he upholds the universe by the word of his power.” This verse does not mean that Jesus is holding creation upon his shoulders like Atlas, but rather by His providence, He directs everything that happens towards the Father’s purposes. Consequently, we know that Jesus the Son of God is fully divine, because He does the things only God can do!
There is a second way that Jesus is “the Son of God.” The Lord of the Supper is...

The Messianic Son of God

We see this in (Heb 1:2) when we read, “whom he appointed the heir of all things,” and again in (Heb 1:3-4) were we read, “he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high, having become as much superior to the angels as the name he has inherited is more excellent than theirs.” Verse 2 is a clear allusion to Psalm 2:8, which reads
Psalm 2:8 ESV
Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your possession.
The Jews of the first century understood Psalm 2 as a Messianic Psalm. The author of Hebrews is saying that after His death and resurrection, Jesus was crowned by the Father as the Messianic King. The word “name” is being used in the sense of “rank.” The phrase “son of God” is often used as a title of rank in the bible. For example, the angels are called “sons of God” in the bible because of their high rank, but now the incarnate, resurrected Jesus has been exalted to a rank even higher than the angels—He is the Messianic Son of God!
This twofold sense in which Jesus is the “Son of God,” both divine and human, makes Him the perfect and only possible Savior. This brings us to the third thing which we learn about the Lord of the Supper from this passage.

The One Who Made Purification for Sin

This is found in Heb 1:3 in the center, most prominent place in the beautiful introduction: “After making purification for sins...”
There is so much meaning in those five words. There is nothing we need more than to have purification for sin. The sin problem we all have is so great that only God himself can pay the price for our sins. However, because sin is a human problem, only a human representative can take the responsibility for paying it. This is why the Son, the second member of the Trinity, had to take on human flesh. As one who was fully divine and fully human, He is uniquely able to pay the price for our sin. We will be learning about this in much greater detail as we continue through the book of Hebrews, but for now the important thing for you to remember is that Jesus is your perfect and only Savior.

Conclusion: Come to the Table in Confidence

These three truths give us confidence in coming to the Lord’s Table today. No one here, in and of themselves, is worthy of coming to this Table. We daily add to our sin. Even now, none of us can claim to love God with “all our heart, mind and soul” and “our neighbor as ourselves.” If we can’t fulfill the requirements of the most fundamental commandments, how can we think we can fulfill any of the others?
Yet Christ invites us to come, not because we are righteous in and of ourselves, but because He paid the price for our sin and clothes us in His righteousness! No wonder this message is called Good News, for that is what the word “gospel” means—Good News!
Perhaps there is someone here today that the Good News makes sense to them for the first time. If you are that person, I urge you to make Jesus your Lord and Savior as I pray. Let us pray.
Heavenly Father, we thank you that in these last days you speak to us through your Son, Jesus the Messiah. We thank you that He has made perfect purification for our sins. Open our eyes to His Supremacy and Sufficiency so that we may come to His Table with confidence to receive provision in our time of need. Amen.
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