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A True Servant and a Committed Wife

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UTAWALA BAPTIST CHURCHA TRUE SERVANT AND A COMMITTED WIFE

25-02-2007
Genesis 24:1–67

Scripture Reading

We find much less information in the Bible about Isaac, then for Abraham, Jacob or Joseph the other three patriarchs in our study.

We read nothing of Isaac after Genesis 22

In chapter 23 Sarah Isaac’s mother dies and is buried.

The longest chapter in Genesis chapter 24 focuses on a most important matter, the selection of a proper wife for Isaac.

The material here can be summarized in four words: concern, commitment, choice and comfort.

A. Abraham’s Concern (Gen 24:1–9).

 

Three years after the death of Sarah Abraham became especially concerned about securing a wife for his son Isaac.

Abraham places a solemn oath or vow on his most trusted servant Eliezer. GEN 47:29

The oath had a negative and positive side

          Negative GEN 24:3

Abraham had seen the gross idolatry and immorality of the Canaanite’s religious life.

Positive GEN 24:4

          Eliezer was to go unto Abraham’s kindred to find a wife for Isaac.

Although worship of the true God was not pure there it was much superior to that of the Canaanites.

          Eliezer’s Qualities

a.     Accepted the challenge Genesis 24:3; 9

b.    Examined the alternatives Genesis 24:5-6

c.     Promised to follow directions Genesis 24:9

Eleizer wisely inquires of the implications

       If no wife can be found should he take Isaac back Paddan Aram?

                 Abraham answers strongly NO!

                 God had given to Abraham’s descendants!

For Isaac to forsake the land even for a wife would be unacceptable.

If the woman would not return with Eleizer to Canaan, Eleizer would be released from the vow. (Genesis 24:5-6)

 

The implication or point made here is that it is better to remain unmarried than to be married to the wrong person.

All talk of what might happen if the marital prospect refused to return with the servant was academic.

Abraham believed that God would send his angel before the servant. That fact would crown his mission with success.

Here then is the logic of faith.

God had made promises, and he would keep those promises.

Isaac belonged to God, for Abraham had laid him on the altar long before.

Therefore, God would supply the need now as surely as he supplied the ram on Moriah (24:7–8).

Having heard the stipulations of the proposed oath and Abraham’s optimistic outlook about the mission.

Eleizer puts his hand under Abraham’s thigh and swore the oath. (Genesis 24:9)

B. The Servant’s Commitment (Gen 24:10–49).

 

          Eleizer: Made a plan. (Genesis 24:12-14)

          Eleizer: Submitted the plan to God. (Genesis 24:12-14)

          Eleizer: Prayed for guidance. (Genesis 24:12-14)

Eleizer: Devised a strategy with room for God to operate. (Genesis 24:12-14)

 

Eleizer lost no time in departing on his mission.

The servant’s destination was the city of Nahor (Haran), a city of Aram Naharim, Aram of the two rivers. This region is also known as Mesopotamia (Genesis 24:10)

 

The same city in which Abraham buried his father Te’rah in Genesis 11:32.

Before he finished with his prayer we find Rebekah coming to the well to draw water.

We find Abraham watching remaining silent as he sees his questions answered.

Wondering in his mind whether or not this was the girl who had been chosen by the Lord (Genesis 24:15–21).

After the camels complete their drinking Abraham gives Rebekah several pieces of valuable jewelry and Rebekah invites him to her home.

Rebekah did not hesitate to invite a stranger to lodge at her house.

         

The servant bowed his head and thanked the Lord for leading him so quickly to the family of Abraham (Genesis 24:22–27).        

Laban the brother rather than Bethuel the father appears to have been acting as family head. Why this was so is not clear.

Laban formally extended an invitation to the servant. He invoked the name of Yahweh (Jehovah) when he addressed the stranger. This was further confirmation that the servant had come to the right place.

At the house, the camels were first unloaded and tended.

The feet of the travelers were washed, and food was placed before them.

Abraham’s servant would not eat, however, until he had related the purpose of his visit (Genesis 24:31–33).

Abraham relates the circumstances that had brought him to Haran.

                   How he had prayed at the well.

How Rebekah fulfilled precisely the requirements in his prayer.

Eleizer then asks the family for some indication of their thoughts and intentions.

So that he might determine his next move. (Genesis 24:34-49)

 

C. Rebekah’s Choice (Gen 24:50–61).

 

          Eleizer waited Genesis 24:21

          Eleizer watched closely Genesis 24:21

 

          Eleizer Accepted the answer thankfully Genesis 24:26

Eleizer Explained the situation to concerned parties Genesis 23:34-49)

Laban and Bethuel were impressed by the sequence of events which the servant narrated.

They were convinced that God himself had selected Rebekah for Isaac’s wife.

They felt that they had no right to interfere in any way.

They gave approval for the servant to take Rebekah with him back to Canaan (Genesis24:50–51).

The servant was overjoyed with this immediate and devout response.

He thanked the Lord for what had happened, and he gave rich gifts to Rebekah and to her mother and brother.

Then the servant and those with him ate and went to bed (Genesis 24:52–54).

In the morning the servant bade leave of his hosts to return to Canaan.

The mother and brother thought this departure to be too hasty.

They wanted to give Rebekah a proper send-off taking ten days...

The servant, however, persisted in his request for an immediate departure.

Finally the mother and brother decided to let Rebekah herself decide.

She was willing to leave immediately (Genesis 24:54–58).

         

D. Isaac’s Comfort (Gen 24:62–67).

 

          Eleizer refused unnecessary delay Genesis 24:56

          Eleizer followed through with the entire plan Genesis 24:66

 

In contemplation of his forthcoming marriage, Isaac had visited the sacred site of Beer-lahai-roi where the angel of the Lord had once appeared.

He appears to have separated himself from the camp of Abraham for he was living in the desert at this time.

Isaac went out to the field one evening “to meditate” (lasuach), a word used only here in the Old Testament.

He lifted up his eyes and saw the caravan approaching. How his heart must have pounded with excitement as he contemplated meeting for the first time his bride.

Rebekah noticed a man coming across the field to meet the camels.

When she learned that this was Isaac, she got down from her camel, and covered her face with a veil.

She was demonstrating modesty and respect for her future husband.

When the servant rehearsed the details of his journey, Isaac knew that Rebekah was his divinely chosen mate.

Isaac honored his bride by assigning her to the tent of his beloved mother. After arrangements could be made,

Isaac married Rebekah. Even though there had been no lengthy courtship considered so essential in some cultures.

Isaac loved Rebekah.

She supplied that womanly charm and companionship which brought Isaac comfort in the loneliness he experienced after the death of his mother Sarah.

REVIEW TRAITS OF A TRUE SERVANT

UTAWALA BAPTIST CHURCHA TRUE SERVANT AND A COMMITTED WIFE

25-02-2007
Genesis 24:1–67

Scripture Reading

We find much less information in the Bible about Isaac, then for Abraham, Jacob or Joseph the other three patriarchs in our study.

We read nothing of Isaac after Genesis 22

In chapter 23 Sarah Isaac’s mother dies and is buried.

The longest chapter in Genesis chapter 24 focuses on a most important matter, the selection of a proper wife for Isaac.

The material here can be summarized in four words: concern, commitment, choice and comfort.

A. Abraham’s Concern (Gen 24:1–9).

 

Three years after the death of Sarah Abraham became especially concerned about securing a wife for his son Isaac.

Abraham places a solemn oath or vow on his most trusted servant Eliezer. GEN 47:29

The oath had a negative and positive side

          Negative GEN 24:3

Abraham had seen the gross idolatry and immorality of the Canaanite’s religious life.

Positive GEN 24:4

          Eliezer was to go unto Abraham’s kindred to find a wife for Isaac.

Although worship of the true God was not pure there it was much superior to that of the Canaanites.

          Eliezer’s Qualities

a.     Accepted the challenge Genesis 24:3; 9

b.    Examined the alternatives Genesis 24:5-6

c.     Promised to follow directions Genesis 24:9

Eleizer wisely inquires of the implications

       If no wife can be found should he take Isaac back Paddan Aram?

                 Abraham answers strongly NO!

                 God had given to Abraham’s descendants!

For Isaac to forsake the land even for a wife would be unacceptable.

If the woman would not return with Eleizer to Canaan, Eleizer would be released from the vow. (Genesis 24:5-6)

 

The implication or point made here is that it is better to remain unmarried than to be married to the wrong person.

All talk of what might happen if the marital prospect refused to return with the servant was academic.

Abraham believed that God would send his angel before the servant. That fact would crown his mission with success.

Here then is the logic of faith.

God had made promises, and he would keep those promises.

Isaac belonged to God, for Abraham had laid him on the altar long before.

Therefore, God would supply the need now as surely as he supplied the ram on Moriah (24:7–8).

Having heard the stipulations of the proposed oath and Abraham’s optimistic outlook about the mission.

Eleizer puts his hand under Abraham’s thigh and swore the oath. (Genesis 24:9)

B. The Servant’s Commitment (Gen 24:10–49).

 

          Eleizer: Made a plan. (Genesis 24:12-14)

          Eleizer: Submitted the plan to God. (Genesis 24:12-14)

          Eleizer: Prayed for guidance. (Genesis 24:12-14)

Eleizer: Devised a strategy with room for God to operate. (Genesis 24:12-14)

 

Eleizer lost no time in departing on his mission.

The servant’s destination was the city of Nahor (Haran), a city of Aram Naharim, Aram of the two rivers. This region is also known as Mesopotamia (Genesis 24:10)

 

The same city in which Abraham buried his father Te’rah in Genesis 11:32.

Before he finished with his prayer we find Rebekah coming to the well to draw water.

We find Abraham watching remaining silent as he sees his questions answered.

Wondering in his mind whether or not this was the girl who had been chosen by the Lord (Genesis 24:15–21).

After the camels complete their drinking Abraham gives Rebekah several pieces of valuable jewelry and Rebekah invites him to her home.

Rebekah did not hesitate to invite a stranger to lodge at her house.

         

The servant bowed his head and thanked the Lord for leading him so quickly to the family of Abraham (Genesis 24:22–27).        

Laban the brother rather than Bethuel the father appears to have been acting as family head. Why this was so is not clear.

Laban formally extended an invitation to the servant. He invoked the name of Yahweh (Jehovah) when he addressed the stranger. This was further confirmation that the servant had come to the right place.

At the house, the camels were first unloaded and tended.

The feet of the travelers were washed, and food was placed before them.

Abraham’s servant would not eat, however, until he had related the purpose of his visit (Genesis 24:31–33).

Abraham relates the circumstances that had brought him to Haran.

                   How he had prayed at the well.

How Rebekah fulfilled precisely the requirements in his prayer.

Eleizer then asks the family for some indication of their thoughts and intentions.

So that he might determine his next move. (Genesis 24:34-49)

 

C. Rebekah’s Choice (Gen 24:50–61).

 

          Eleizer waited Genesis 24:21

          Eleizer watched closely Genesis 24:21

 

          Eleizer Accepted the answer thankfully Genesis 24:26

Eleizer Explained the situation to concerned parties Genesis 23:34-49)

Laban and Bethuel were impressed by the sequence of events which the servant narrated.

They were convinced that God himself had selected Rebekah for Isaac’s wife.

They felt that they had no right to interfere in any way.

They gave approval for the servant to take Rebekah with him back to Canaan (Genesis24:50–51).

The servant was overjoyed with this immediate and devout response.

He thanked the Lord for what had happened, and he gave rich gifts to Rebekah and to her mother and brother.

Then the servant and those with him ate and went to bed (Genesis 24:52–54).

In the morning the servant bade leave of his hosts to return to Canaan.

The mother and brother thought this departure to be too hasty.

They wanted to give Rebekah a proper send-off taking ten days...

The servant, however, persisted in his request for an immediate departure.

Finally the mother and brother decided to let Rebekah herself decide.

She was willing to leave immediately (Genesis 24:54–58).

         

D. Isaac’s Comfort (Gen 24:62–67).

 

          Eleizer refused unnecessary delay Genesis 24:56

          Eleizer followed through with the entire plan Genesis 24:66

 

In contemplation of his forthcoming marriage, Isaac had visited the sacred site of Beer-lahai-roi where the angel of the Lord had once appeared.

He appears to have separated himself from the camp of Abraham for he was living in the desert at this time.

Isaac went out to the field one evening “to meditate” (lasuach), a word used only here in the Old Testament.

He lifted up his eyes and saw the caravan approaching. How his heart must have pounded with excitement as he contemplated meeting for the first time his bride.

Rebekah noticed a man coming across the field to meet the camels.

When she learned that this was Isaac, she got down from her camel, and covered her face with a veil.

She was demonstrating modesty and respect for her future husband.

When the servant rehearsed the details of his journey, Isaac knew that Rebekah was his divinely chosen mate.

Isaac honored his bride by assigning her to the tent of his beloved mother. After arrangements could be made,

Isaac married Rebekah. Even though there had been no lengthy courtship considered so essential in some cultures.

Isaac loved Rebekah.

She supplied that womanly charm and companionship which brought Isaac comfort in the loneliness he experienced after the death of his mother Sarah.

REVIEW TRAITS OF A TRUE SERVANT

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