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Jesus Resurrection

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Homily Easter Vigil   2007

A. Setting (24:1)b.   B. The empty tomb (24:2–3)c.   C. Report of the two angels (24:4–8)i.         i.  Report of the angels (24:4–7)ii.        ii. Response of the women (24:8)d.  D.  Report of the women (24:9–11)e.  E.  Peter’s response (24:12)
A.          

Prelude The earliest form of the gospel tradition that has come to us is recalled by Paul as that which he had received (I Cor. 15:3–7). Strikingly, that tradition, which focuses heavily on the resurrection and the appearances of the risen Christ, mentions neither the empty tomb nor the role of women.[1]

The burden of the Christian proclamation was on the experience of the risen Christ by his followers,[2]

Luke’s reference to the two men (later referred to as a vision of angels, v. 23) joins this episode to the transfiguration (9:30) and the ascension (Acts 1:10) and may indicate how Luke wants the reader to classify and understand this story. This is to say that transfiguration, resurrection, and ascension may be understood as one general category of experience.[3]

Finally, the faith and the witness of the women consisted of three elements: the discovery of the empty tomb, the word of the two messengers, and their remembrance of the words of Jesus. [4]

24:1   First   really is μιᾷ which is “one”  Therefore Day 1   // new creation

                “deep Dawn” ὄρθρου βαθέως God’s actions are sometimes attributed to this time, are made evident then, or are a source of joy starting at that time of day[5]

The early morning setting may be reported in conscious connection with the OT tradition of the early morning being the time in which the action of God during the hours of darkness comes to light (cf. Exod 14:24, 37; 2 Kgs 19:35; Pss 30:5; 90:14; 143:8; Isa 37:36; cf. Claudel, La confession, 83)[6]

24:2-3 There is a nice literary contrast in 24:2–3 between what they found on arrival (the stone rolled away) and what they surprisingly did not find upon entering (Jesus’ body)[7]

Luke sets in verbal opposition the finding of the stone rolled away and the failure now to find the body.[8]

24:4 The language recalls the transfiguration and parallels the two angels present at the ascension (Acts 1:10 also uses ἐσθής [esthēs] to describe the messengers’ clothing).[9]

24:5 Rather, bowing is a sign of recognition of the presence of heavenly beings and divine messengers (Tiede 1988: 430; Danker 1988: 388; Dillon 1978: 26–27; Dan. 7:28; 10:9, 15)[10]

24:6 Despite Jesus’ teaching, the resurrection was too unbelievable to register with the disciples until after it occurred, a reaction that is natural enough, given the rarity of such an event.[11]

For Luke, the call to remember is important because for him the significance of the resurrection is inseparable from Jesus’ prior announcement of the necessity of both his suffering and his vindication as Son of Man. [12]

24:7 In one of the most important passages in the chapter, Luke summarizes Jesus’ prediction that is now fulfilled.[13]

The message is summarized in three infinitives that express what God’s plan involved: παραδοθῆναι (paradothēnai, to be given over), σταυρωθῆναι (staurōthēnai, to be crucified), and ἀναστῆναι (anastēnai, to be raised).[14]

24:8

24:9

24:10

24:11 λῆρος (lēros, nonsense or idle talk; BAGD 473; BAA 960; 4 Macc. 5:11; Josephus, Jewish War 3.8.9 §405), a term used in medical settings of the delirious talk of the very sick (Plummer 1896: 550)[15]

24:12 Peter, in effect, repeats the discovery of the women (note the minor chiasm linking the coming to the tomb in v 1 and that in v 12) that the tomb is empty. But his spying of the “linen cloths” takes things one step further: anyone who wanted to remove the body would have kept it wrapped in the grave clothes. [16]

Peter goes off wondering, still some considerable distance from having an Easter faith[17]

Summary  

. Peter is left to marvel over events and the reminder of Jesus’ words. It is a moment for reflection, decision, and faith. Is resurrection the only adequate explanation for what Peter sees?

[18]


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[1]Craddock, F. B. (1990). Luke. Interpretation, a Bible commentary for teaching and preaching (280). Louisville, Ky.: John Knox Press.

[2]Craddock, F. B. (1990). Luke. Interpretation, a Bible commentary for teaching and preaching (281). Louisville, Ky.: John Knox Press.

[3]Craddock, F. B. (1990). Luke. Interpretation, a Bible commentary for teaching and preaching (281). Louisville, Ky.: John Knox Press.

[4]Craddock, F. B. (1990). Luke. Interpretation, a Bible commentary for teaching and preaching (283). Louisville, Ky.: John Knox Press.

[5]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1885). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

OT Old Testament

cf. confer, compare

[6]Nolland, J. (2002). Vol. 35C: Word Biblical Commentary : Luke 18:35-24:53. Word Biblical Commentary (1188). Dallas: Word, Incorporated.

[7]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1888). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

[8]Nolland, J. (2002). Vol. 35C: Word Biblical Commentary : Luke 18:35-24:53. Word Biblical Commentary (1189). Dallas: Word, Incorporated.

[9]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1890). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

[10]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1891). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

[11]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1892). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

[12]Nolland, J. (2002). Vol. 35C: Word Biblical Commentary : Luke 18:35-24:53. Word Biblical Commentary (1190). Dallas: Word, Incorporated.

[13]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1893). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

[14]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1893). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

BAGD A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, by W. Bauer, W. F. Arndt, F. W. Gingrich, and F. W. Danker (2d ed.; Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979)

BAA Griechisch-Deutsches Wörterbuch zu den Schriften des Neuen Testaments und der frühchristlichen Literatur, by W. Bauer, K. Aland, and B. Aland (6th ed.; Berlin: de Gruyter, 1988)

[15]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1898). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

[16]Nolland, J. (2002). Vol. 35C: Word Biblical Commentary : Luke 18:35-24:53. Word Biblical Commentary (1192). Dallas: Word, Incorporated.

[17]Nolland, J. (2002). Vol. 35C: Word Biblical Commentary : Luke 18:35-24:53. Word Biblical Commentary (1194). Dallas: Word, Incorporated.

[18]Bock, D. L. (1996). Luke Volume 2: 9:51-24:53. Baker exegetical commentary on the New Testament (1901). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

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