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TEACHING IS ...

Titus 2:1-15

John W. Worley, Ph.D.

Guest Preacher

Lisbon, Portugal

April 11, 1997


TEACHING IS ...

Titus 2:1-15

1 But speak thou the things which become sound doctrine:

2 That the aged men be sober, grave, temperate, sound in faith, in charity, in patience.

3 The aged women likewise, that they be in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things;

4 That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,

5 To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.

6 Young men likewise exhort to be sober minded.

7 In all things shewing thyself a pattern of good works: in doctrine shewing uncorruptness, gravity, sincerity,

8 Sound speech, that cannot be condemned; that he that is of the contrary part may be ashamed, having no evil thing to say of you.

9 Exhort servants to be obedient unto their own masters, and to please them well in all things; not answering again;

10 Not purloining, but shewing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things.

11 For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men,

12 Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world;

13 Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;

14 Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.

15 These things speak, and exhort, and rebuke with all authority. Let no man despise thee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 But speak thou the things which become sound doctrine:


 

ATeach what is in accord with sound doctrine@ Titus 2:1-15.

 

 Here as in Timothy Asound@ doctrine is healthy doctrine. God=s truth has a vitality, that is not only healthy itself but that produces health and well being in the believer.

In a way, Christian truth is a wonder drug. Kept in the laboratory, or the theologian=s dissertation, truth may be fascinating and worthy of study. But the real value of truth is when it is given to suffering human beings, and then it makes us well.

When Paul said, ATeach what is in accord with sound doctrine,@ he put the emphasis on the truth=s application to life. He did not say, ATeach sound doctrine,@ as though truth were to be examined only in the classroom. He said, ATeach what is in accord with sound doctrine@ (italics added). Christian teaching is to emphasize the healthy lifestyle that is produced in believers by God=s health-giving Word.

2 That the aged men be sober, grave, temperate, sound in faith, in charity, in patience. 3 The aged women likewise, that they be in behavior as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things; 4 That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children, 5 To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.

 

6 Young men likewise exhort to be sober minded.

 

2:6 Titus was to address the young men with one message: ABe soberminded!@ He was to Aexhort@ (encourage, urge) them to this one objective.

 

Sophronein (@soberminded, self-controlled, prudent@) is a word often found in this letter to Titus (see 1:8; 2:2,4). It stresses the need for self mastery.

7 In all things shewing thyself a pattern (5179)of good works: in doctrine shewing uncorruptness, gravity, sincerity,

 5179 tupos {too'-pos}

from 5180; TDNT 8:246,1193; n m


AV - ensample 5, print 2, figure 2, example 2, pattern 2, fashion 1,

     manner 1, form 1; 16

1) the mark of a stroke or blow, print

2) a figure formed by a blow or impression

   2a) of a figure or image

   2b) of the image of the gods

3) form

   3a) the teaching which embodies the sum and substance of religion

       and represents it to the mind, manner of writing, the contents

       and form of a letter

4) an example

   4a) in the technical sense, the pattern in conformity to which a

       thing must be made

   4b) in an ethical sense, a dissuasive example, a pattern of warning

       4b1) of ruinous events which serve as admonitions or warnings

            to others

   4c) an example to be imitated

       4c1) of men worthy of imitation

   4d) in a doctrinal sense

       4d1) of a type i.e. a person or thing prefiguring a future

            (Messianic) person or thing

tupos is rather the impress which makes an impress, so that in context the teaching can be described as the mould and norm (Aas the stamp which impresses on man a specific character moulded by it@) which shapes th whole personal conduct of the one who is delivered up to it and has become obedient thereto.

Tupos = Aearthly copy@.

Exodus 25:40 Heavenly origional of the tabernacle is called tupos.

7 In all things shewing thyself a pattern of good works: in doctrine shewing uncorruptness, gravity, sincerity,

 

2:7 Having given instructions regarding young men, Paul now charged Titus (who may be considered a Ayoung man@) to proclaim the gospel by his life. The word Apattern@ is tupos (Aexample, model@). Literally it means Aan impress of a die.@ The same charge was given to Timothy (1 Tim. 4:12). But here Titus was commanded to be an example of Agood works@ (a key term in this epistle). His life should show what the gospel is an can do.

 


But his talk was important too. His Adoctrine@ (teaching) was to show Auncorruptness@ (untaintedness, integrity). This underscores the need for purity of motive. Titus= teaching was to show Agravity@ (seriousness, reverence, dignity). This points out the need for dignity of manner. As a teacher, Titus should demonstrate both purity of motive and dignity of manner.

8. Sound speech, that cannot be condemned that he that is of the contrary part may be ashamed, having no evil thing to say of you.

 

8 Sound speech, (soundness of speech or wholesome speech)  that cannot be condemned; (censured, reproached) would put his opponents to shame. If Titus was an example in the words he spoke those who opposed him (Ahe that is of the contrary part@) would find nothing they could gainsay.  The final clause of this verse, @having no evil thing to say of you@ carries the idea that Titus was to present no opportunity for his opponents to use an evil report against him. His Asound speech@ was to be truthful, wholesome, and absolutely irreproachable. Anything his opponents might say would then be seen as false, fabricated, empty, and evil.

 

 9 Exhort servants to be obedient unto their own masters, and to please them well in all things; not answering again; 10 Not purloining, but shewing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things. 11 For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men,

 

12 Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world;

 

 

 

ATeaching@ here is more than instruction. The word in the Greek means the whole process of educating a child-instruction, encouragement, and discipline. The grace of God teaches that Christians should live differently. First, negatively, they deny or renounce Aungodliness@ (lack of reverence for God, godlessness). Second, they give up Aworldly lusts@ (passions, desires).

 

Positively, Christians live Asoberly@ (self-controlled, prudently), Arighteously@ (upright, justly), and Agodly@ (reverently). A triad of relationships may be seen in these adverbs. A Christian lives right in relation to himself (self-controlled), to others (justly), and to God (reverently). He does this Ain the present world@ (age).

 

13 Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ; 14 Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.

 


5 These things speak, and exhort, and rebuke with all authority. Let no man despise thee.

As a summary, verse 15 is transitional to 3:1 where Titus was to speak, exhort, and rebuke. ASpeak@ (teach) involves proclamation.

 

The command Aexhort@ involves encouragement (compare 2 Timothy 4:2). Titus was to encourage the Cretan Christians with positive and edifying words, but with the balance of the next command. ARebuke@ (reprove) involves the ministry of conviction. Titus was to convince wrongdoers of their sins so that they might repent and seek God=s forgiveness and cleansing.

 

Titus was to do all this Awith all authority@ (epitages). This Greek term is used only by Paul and always in the sense of a divine command. Titus was to recognize that his authority came from God. He then must not allow anyone to Adespise@ (disregard) him (compare 1 Timothy 4:12).


Teaching Is...

If you=ve thought of Ateaching@ and or Alearning@ as something that happens in a classroom, where rows of students sit to listen as a teacher gives them important information, Titus 2 holds some surprises. In the first place, Ateaching@ here isn=t about information. Teaching is about life. It=s not Asound doctrine@ but Awhat is in accord with sound doctrine@ that Paul urged Titus to teach (V.1.) Paul didn=t insist Titus make sure each believer can proof-text the Trinity. But he did insist believers learn to be reverent, self-controlled, pure, upright, and godly.

Next, teaching isn=t a classroom kind of thing! The teacher of Titus 2 is so involved in life with the learners that he or she is able to Aset them an example by doing what is good@ (v.7.).

Finally, Christian Ateaching@ is such a broad concept that no single word can describe the activity. This chapter says Ateach@ (vv. 1-4,7, 9-10, 12, 15), Atrain@ )v.4.), Aencourage@ (vv. 6,15), Aset and example@ (v.7), and Arebuke@ )v.15). If we were to include all the ideas conveyed by the Greek words, teaching would be:

Speaking, communication, asserting, encouraging, advising, urging, providing a pattern or example to follow, instructing, guiding, correcting, bringing to light, exposing, pointing out, convincing, and reproving when necessary to convict, and all to help another live a life that fits the truth we believe, and the relationship we have with Jesus Christ.

PERSONAL APPLICATION

 

More real teaching takes place outside the church building

than in it -- and you and I are the teachers.


 

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